Question about Akai PDP4206EA Television

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I NEED THE VIDEO BOARD for akai pdp 4206ea

I HAVE PIXEL IMAGES LIKE PIXELS SHADOWS,I NEED THE VIDEO BOARD,

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I have this board... I just sent you an email. If you've already got your PDP taken apart can you d/l the firmware from the serial port for me? I can tell you how to make the cable, or send you the one I made. If you can do this for me, than we can just swap the firmware for the board.

JE

Posted on Jul 15, 2009

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Where can I get a readable user manual?


Digital Cameras beginner guide
Digital Cameras - A beginner's guide by Bob Atkins, 2003

Digital Camera Basics - A primer Digital cameras are confusing to a lot of new users. In this basic guide to digital camera technology we hope to try to give digital beginners at least some basis to use in deciding which digital camera is appropriate for them. When shopping for a digital camera it's at least good to know what the basic terms like white balance, pixel, ppi and dpi mean and how they affect image and print quality. It's also important to know the difference between things like optical zoom and digital zoom as well as the advantages and disadvantages between storage formats such as Compact Flash (CF), Microdrives, Sony Memory Stick, Secure Digital (SD), Multimedia and camera interface technologies such as USB 1.1, USB 2.0 and Firewire IEEE 1394.
Pixels A pixel is a contraction if the term PIcture ELement. Digital images are made up of small squares, just like a tile mosaic on your kitchen or bathroom wall. Though a digital photograph looks smooth and continuous just like a regular photograph, it's actually composed of millions of tiny squares as shown below.

Each pixel in the image has a numerical value of between 0 and 255 and is made up of three color channels. So for example a pixel could be 37-red, 76-green and 125-blue and it would then look like this . If it was 162-red, 27-green and 12-blue, it would look like this . There are over 16 million possible combinations using this scheme and each one represents a different color. Computer savvy readers will note that each color in this scheme can be represented by an 8-bit number (byte), so the color of each pixel is defined by three color bytes. This scheme can be expanded, for example to use 16-bits (two 8-bit bytes) for each color. images using three 8-bit values are sometimes called 24-bit color images. images using three 12-bit values for color definition are called 36-bit color images, and those using three 16-bit values are called 48-bit color images.

Pixel Count One of the main ways that manufacturers categorize their digital cameras is in terms of pixel count. What this is is the number of individual pixels that go into making each image. Today this number varies between 1 million (1 Megapixel) to around 14 million (14 Megapixels). A million pixels is abbreviated to MP, so a 1MP camera has 1 million pixels and a 3MP camera has 3 million pixels. Currently most popular consumer digital cameras have between 2MP and 5MP. A 3MP camera can make excellent 4"x6" prints and very good 5"x7" prints. If you intend to make lots of 8"x10" prints, then perhaps a 4MP or 5MP camera would be a better choice. Sometimes two numbers are given, total pixels and effective pixels. Total pixels count every pixel on the sensor surface. Usually the very edge pixels aren't used in the final image. Effective pixels are the number of pixels actually used in the image after the edge pixels have been dropped.

Aspect Ratio The aspect ratio of a camera is the ratio of the length of the sides of the images. For example, a traditional 35mm film frame is approximately 36mm wide and 24mm HIGH. This has an aspect ratio of 36:24, which can equally well be expressed as 3:2. Some digicams use the same aspect ratio for their digital images. For example most digital SLR (single lens reflex) cameras have a 3:2 aspect ratio. However, video monitors typically use a 4:3 aspect ratio. For example a monitor with a 800x600 display has a 4:3 aspect ratio. With this in mind, most consumer level digicams use a 4:3 aspect ratio for their images.
Sensor Size The size of the digital sensor element (which is equivalent to the size of the negative for film cameras) is pretty small in all consumer digicams - typically around the size of a fingernail (and a small fingernail at that!). As I said above, a 35mm film frame is 24mm high by 36mm wide but most digital cameras use sensors very much smaller than this. Here are some typical digicam sensor sizes. The "name" of the sensor is based on specification for old TV tubes used in the 1950s. Nobody is quite sure why it's being used for modern digital sensors since the "sizes" don't really relate in any consistent way to the actual physical size of the sensor. However these names are widely used, so it's best to know what they are. They are often listed in digital camera spec sheets.

for more info click on link above.

Jun 23, 2015 | Cameras

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Why possible is 300 dpi printing images and text matter


What is DPI PPI and Why Do They Matter
To some extent, we're all photographers these days. With a camera on every phone and digital SLRs coming down in price, we've all got a trove of photos waiting to be shared. When it comes time to share online, print, or email our favorite images, many are unsure about how to set the image's resolution...
If you've found yourself in this spot, don't worry - dots per inch (shortened to DPI from here on out) is a concept that even confounds some professional graphic artists. Here's a primer DPI so you can stop worrying about technology and start sharing your photos.
Getting started
Digital photos are comprised of pixels, much like the individual boxes on a sheet of graph paper. DPI tells you how small those pixels will be when the image is printed. For example, "300 dots per inch" means that 300 pixels fit across each inch. If your photo is 600 pixels tall by 900 pixels wide, for example, it would come out at 2" x 3" inches if you were to print at 300 DPI. Keep in mind that most digital photos are several thousand pixels in either direction, but for the sake of simplicity, we'll use the more manageable 600 x 900 pixels.
Separating pixels from presentation
It's important to separate DPI from the raw pixel dimensions, and this is where even the pros slip up. DPI is not an indication of image quality or clarity. When you print that 600 x 900 pixel image at 300DPI, it'll likely look pretty sharp, because every inch is densely packed with pixels.
Now imagine printing that same image, with the same number of pixels, at a mere 30 DPI. As each inch would have only 30 pixels across, the density drops immensely and the image prints much larger: 20" by 30". What was once sharp now appears blurry, because each individual pixel is now ten times larger than before. By separating DPI from actual pixel count, we can understand that raising DPI doesn't magically improve a photo. DPI simply takes the same data (the original pixels) and alters how we'll view them.
Pin it It's all about context
Another factor is viewing distance. Just think of the eye chart at your doctor's office. If you're a bit nearsighted, the tiny letters at the bottom are illegible specks, while the letters at the top are easily discerned. In actuality, each tiny letter may be half an inch tall, but the distance makes them seem microscopic. Now consider our 600 by 900 pixel image. When we printed it at 30 DPI, the giant pixels made it look blurry. Were we to look at it across the doctor's office long hallway, however, it may look just as sharp as the 300 DPI print did in our hands. This illustrates how DPI is more about context than quality.

Pin it Pixels Per Inch
You'll notice I've been talking about DPI in relation to printing only. This is because while printers can produce a variety of DPI settings, a computer display's resolution is fixed - its pixel density is part of the physical hardware, and cannot be altered. When talking about displays instead of print, most use the term PPI, or "pixels per inch."
If you intend to put your 600 x 900 pixel image online, switching the resolution to 30, 300, or 3000 PPI is completely arbitrary, because the computer display can't change its density. As modern desktop displays usually have a PPI in the low 100s, the 600 x 900 pixel image will appear around 6" by 9" (mobile displays may be much higher). Of course, your web browser could display the image smaller if need be, but it will do so by averaging and eliminating pixels, not squeezing them to be physically smaller. This is why it's always important to keep your end goal in mind when working with images.
In summary:
• An image is defined by its pixel dimensions - # pixels tall by # pixels wide
• DPI/PPI determines the scale and pixel density at which image will be displayed
• What appears blurry from close up may look fine at a distance, so consider how an image will be seen
• Printers can produce a range of DPIs, while displays have fixed resolution
Whether you're a blogger dealing with an upload limit or are just trying to print a photo to hang on the wall, understanding DPI/PPI can go a long way. I hope these tips help you feel more in control of your images and how you share them with the world!


Oct 07, 2014 | Canon LASER SHOT LBP-2900 Printer

1 Answer

Recently I found one balck spot on my picture, I dont know whay the black spot is coming. I am having a Nikkon D90 18-105 lens.


The black spot can be from one or two sources. The first, is a called a stuck or hot pixel. Your camera's sensor has 12.9 million pixels (12.3 million are used for the image). Many times, a hot or stuck pixel is a bright color - red, yellow, green, etc. It can be any color however. Dark or black pixels can also be called dead pixels as they look like they're "off." Regardless of which your camera suffers, it will not respond to light projected on the sensor by the lens. You'll have to have manually edit the pixel in each image, or return to Nikon for sensor replacement. Nikon used to perform a mapping out of the pixel, but it seems that they don't do this any longer. A sensor replacement can cost in the hundreds of dollars.

The second source, is dust on the sensor. A pixel(s) blocked by dust will show up in each picture, but will appear to be more in focus in some images than others - depending on the aperture value of the camera when the exposure was made. A stuck pixel usually has a very definite edge on all images regardless of aperture setting. A simple, careful wet cleaning of the sensor with a product designed specifically for the job can solve this problem pretty quickly.

Here's a video for wet sensor cleaning from Youtube There are others here too. I hope this was helpful & good luck!

Jun 06, 2011 | Nikon D90 Digital Camera with 18-105mm...

1 Answer

Images show double images like shadows


Ur tv have a problems known as a convergence problems,it dead.Tv have colors lines R,G,B mis alignments,have colors shadows pictures or 3D pictures alike?The tv convergence board have dead 2 STK convergence ICS and some or all of it resistors too.These parts,must be replaced on the tv convergence board to fix the tv convergence board to solved the tv picture convergence problems.Try website like Tvrepairworld.com to buy a whole convergence board for the replacement,might still have it.The DLP tvs AKAI and Samsung tvs used the same convergence board.Or the shop,will cost u like 300-350 for parts and labors.

Dec 17, 2010 | Samsung HCM5525W 55" Rear Projection...

2 Answers

Pixel shader


A pixel shader computes color and other attributes of each pixel. Pixel shaders range from always outputting the same color, to applying a lighting value, to doing bump mapping, shadows, specular highlights, translucency and other phenomena. A pixel shader alone cannot produce very complex effects, because it operates only on a single pixel, without knowledge of a scene's geometry or of neighboring pixels. A pixel shader is a computation kernel function. Pixel shaders can alter the depth of the pixel (for Z-buffering), or output more than one color if multiple render targets are active

Feb 02, 2009 | ATI RADEON X1650 Graphic Card

1 Answer

What is pixel shader


Here is the answer right of Wikepedia.

A pixel shader computes color and other attributes of each pixel. Pixel shaders range from always outputting the same color, to applying a lighting value, to doing bump mapping, shadows, specular highlights, translucency and other phenomena. A pixel shader alone cannot produce very complex effects, because it operates only on a single pixel, without knowledge of a scene's geometry or of neighboring pixels. A pixel shader is a computation kernel function. Pixel shaders can alter the depth of the pixel (for Z-buffering), or output more than one color if multiple render targets are active.

Nov 30, 2008 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

PDP5016H Akai Plasma TV


is the control board the one with the rca jacks on it,for sound and video input?if so email me at mesa1965@yahoo.com,i need one.

Oct 28, 2008 | Akai PDP-5016H 50 in. HD-Ready Plasma...

1 Answer

Red shadows around images on screen, setting convergence doesn't help


HELLO. it not in adjusting the len's it's in the convergance board. the IC'S ON THE BOARD NEED TO BE REPLACED."GOOD LUCK"

Jul 25, 2008 | Akai PTH5498 54" Rear Projection...

1 Answer

What are defect pixels?


Ocassionally images from digital cameras will have "defect" pixels. These pixels may appear in the final photograph as bright white, green or red spots that are out of place when compared to the rest of the image. Sometimes people call these spots "hot" or "dead" pixels. Notice the green defect pixel near the center of this image. Usually these pixels, and other types of "digital noise" appear in the darker or underexposed parts of images; additionally, images taken at longer exposure times are much more likely to have this issue. Many Nikon cameras have a "noise reduction" or "NR" process that fixes these problem areas. When NR is activated and image exposure times drop below 1/4 of a second the NR automatically processes the images as they are saved. This Noise Reduction feature is sometimes called "Night Portrait" or "Night Landscape" Scene Modes. If these spots are seen on images photographed under normal conditions (bright light with exposure times shorter than 1/4 second) then the camera may need to be sent in to a Nikon Service Center for repair.

Aug 29, 2005 | Nikon Coolpix 5700 Digital Camera

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