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Background and foreground problem

Hi there

I have a very simple problem but i am sure the answer is going to be easy...
Every time i try to change the foreground and/or background color from black or white to any other color it automaticly becomes gray.

What's the problem with it or what am i doing wrong?

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Go to image menu under Mode check whether the Grayscale mode in checked. If it is checked than the u may not get color in the foreground and background color , so change that mode approxiate to u and the clor will reflect in your Foreground and background

Posted on Nov 16, 2007

  • Mothiram Janakiraman Nov 16, 2007

    The other thing is it may be quick masked by default u have to remove the mask to reveal the color information as mask and channels work in only black and white and gray tones. Check this in channel or Quickmask under the toolbox

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How to turn off backlight on iphone 4


There is no separate "back light" setting like there used to be on some earlier phones.

In the Settings app of your iPhone, there is a section called "Display & Brightness". You can use that to make your phone's display brighter or dimmer, but as you have probably discovered, it dims or brightens both the foreground and the background elements together as one.

You can turn it all the way down, which is very dim and hard to see in normal indoor light conditions, but may be preferable in extreme low light conditions like in a nightclub setting, or in complete darkness.

Why isn't there a separate back light setting?
To fully answer this, I would probably have get into more than you ever wanted to know about displays.

First, there is really no background or foreground on today's smart phone displays. The foreground elements and background elements we see on the iPhone are really a graphic illusion created by lighting individual pixels with different colors. All of these pixels are on the same plane, so nothing is really behind or in front of anything else. It's just artistically drawn to look that way.

Brightness is simply an "intensity" setting applied uniformly across all of the underlying individual pixels within the display matrix, and has no relationship to color. For clarity, let's look at the difference between lightness in colors, versus display brightness:

COLOR LIGHTNESS is a matter of how much WHITE (all the RGB colors summed, for example) is present in a given color. This has nothing to do with display brightness.

DISPLAY BRIGHTNESS is a matter of how much LIGHT INTENSITY is applied uniformly across all pixels in the display matrix.

At zero display brightness, you would not see white any better than black, blue, green, red or any other color. You wouldn't see anything.

Why did you expect to be able to control the back light?

Prior to the smartphone era, the displays on early cell phones and pagers (and lots of other devices that had displays) had a lighted background that contrasted with dark foreground elements.

The background intensity was a separate setting on those devices, but that's because the background was the only thing that had intensity. The foreground elements were solid black LCD (liquid crystal display) segments that were used to form characters and very simple graphics and lines.

Everything we see on today's smartphone displays is dynamically drawn by lighting different pixels with different colors at different times. Individual pixels on a Retina display are nearly microscopic in size--they cannot be separately discerned by the eye.

Imagine a matrix of microscopic light bulbs, each of which can separately change to any of millions of colors and levels of brightness at any time, on command. Just imagine the sheer number and complexity of possible commands to control a Retina display!

Even if Apple wanted to provide a new feature that enabled us to separately control the perceived "back light", it would only be an illusion as well.

Such a feature would require some sort of complex algorithm to determine which pixels are involved in what you perceive as the "foreground" elements at any given time, so it could add intensity only to those pixels considered to be "background" at any given time.

Since "foreground" and "background" elements drastically change shape (and location) at any time, such a feature would be pretty daunting to implement.

You might be better off using a pure black graphic as your background image if your goal is to have more contrast to make the app icons stand out.

Cheers,

-=Cameron

Aug 12, 2014 | Apple iPhone4 4G iPhone 4

1 Answer

How can i change background in adobe photoshop


First Click on the Paint Bucket Tool, then select the foreground color that you'd like to use as your background fill, hold down the shift key and click the work area background behind your canvas to replace the default grey background with your color.

Jan 21, 2011 | Adobe Photoshop CS2 for PC

1 Answer

Cut image and transfer to transparent background using gimp


Hi Jody,

Gimp can be frustrating, but it's one of the most amazing and powerful free applications out there. You're right...what you're trying to do is very simple, but you need to know a few tricks to get it to work well.

First, you need to use .PNG as .JPG files don't support transparency. When you try to save a file in .JPG that has a transparency, or alpha, channel, you should be prompted to "export" the image by flattening all layers, which essentially replaces all the transparent areas with the current background color (usually white).

Second, there's a tool that's been added to the most recent versions of the Gimp that does exactly what you want to do. It's called the "Foreground Select Tool" and is really simple to use once you get the hang of it. This tool was added in Gimp 2.4, so you'll need at least that version or higher to use it. This tool uses a two-step process: first you draw a rough circle around the object you want to cut out (your daughter), then you "paint" over the foreground object so the tool can sample all the colors you're wanting to extract. This sounds strange until you do it...once you understand, it's really pretty simple. You can read the docs for this tool here. There's also a YouTube video that shows the basic process. Apparently no sound on that video, but at least you can see what to do.

Not sure what was happening when you tried to use the scissors. There are so many variables, it's hard to tell. You probably didn't need the extra step of adding a transparent layer...when you had your selection copied to the clipboard, you could have used "paste into" or "paste as new layer" or "paste as new image" to get what you want.

Let me know if this doesn't answser your question.

---
Eric Imboden
http://commoncontext.com
my take on tech : http://redsquiggly.com

Mar 10, 2009 | GIMP GNU Image Manipulation Program

1 Answer

Black Background Around Layer Window


The expanded area outside your document is called the "workspace". You can change this to any color you want by following these steps:

1) Select the color you want, this will make the selected color into your Foreground color swatch.

2) In the tool palette select the Paint Bucket tool (this tool shares the same space in the tool palette as the gradient tool).

3) Make sure your window is large enough for you to see the workspace.

4) Hold down the Shift key and at the same time click the paint bucket in the workspace.

This will change the color of the workspace to the color you chose as your foreground color in step 1.

Dec 26, 2008 | Adobe Photoshop CS2 for PC

1 Answer

Background is overexposed


So, the problem doesn't seem to be the flash if the actual subject in the foreground is exposed properly. My guess is that the background is being lit by another light source. Typically, your camera uses a flash for dark areas or what it gauges as a dark area. This doesn't adjust the background for additional light sources. For example, if you're standing outside and there's a tree covering someone that you're taking a picture of your flash will adjust to "properly" light that individual. However, because the flash was used for the main subject, the background is actually now overexposed. The overexposed background will show up as a brightly lit area because the camera had to adjust for the foreground. This will actually reverse itself when it's dark out - meaning if the background and foreground are dark, the flash will expose the foreground, but the background will be black. Hopefully, that helps you understand lighting and exposure. Now, to fix this problem when shooting, you would need to consider several options - 1. SLR camera with aperture and f-stop settings as well as compensation controls. This will allow you to control every element of the exposure, but you still need to be aware of the lighting behind the "subject" to properly expose your shots. 2. backlighting compensation - common settings on both SLR and point and shoot cameras that makes auto lighting conversions for backlighting and other common lighting issues. Test whatever options are on your camera to see what works best for your specific problem. 3. Photoshop retouching - you may take one shot with your subject exposed properly and a second shot with the background then merge the images together. 4. using a tripod to shoot without using the flash - this may give you the closest exposure to exactly what you see when looking at your subject.

Dec 19, 2008 | Polaroid i733LP Digital Camera

2 Answers

MS Office Pro 2007


Read this article by Microsoft: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/308417
especially this part:

Manually manage processor scheduling

There are a finite number of resources that are available for a computer's CPU. Windows manages these resources automatically, and can allocate tasks between processors or manage multiple processes on a single processor. You can adjust how Windows manages these resources by prioritizing them between the foreground programs and the background services.

By default, Windows puts a priority on the foreground programs. The added processing resources cause programs to respond more quickly. However, if you have background services, such as printing or disk backup that run while you work and you want them to respond faster, you can have Windows share processor resources equally between background and foreground programs.

Note: My personal recommendation is to allocate more resources to background services.

To manually change the performance of foreground and background programs, complete these steps:

1. Click Start, click Run, type sysdm.cpl in the Open box, and then press ENTER to open the System Properties dialog box.
2. Click the Advanced tab, and then under Performance click Settings.
3. Click the Advanced tab, and then under Processor scheduling use one of the following methods:
* Click Programs to assign more processor resources to the foreground programs. This setting is recommended for most users.
* Click Background services to assign equal amounts of processor resources to all running services. This includes print jobs and applications.
4. Click OK to apply preferences and close the dialog box.



Aug 09, 2008 | Microsoft Office Professional 2007 Full...

1 Answer

Background copy gray


make a new layer. set ur desired foreground color and press ALT+BACKSPACE.
thank you!!!

May 27, 2008 | Adobe Photoshop Elements 2.0 for PC

1 Answer

Need to change backgroud color of photo


This really depends on what the background looks like. In all of these cases, however, a good tip is to copy the background layer so that you have a duplicate layer to work upon. This way you can always mask off some of the top layer if you go too far, or mess up too badly, without losing all your work.

That being said, the first step is to select the background. You might try to start with the magic wand if the background is easy to tell from the foreground. Make sure to check/uncheck "Contiguous" if all of the background pieces are or are touching. Also adjust the sensivity of the majik wand (it goes from 0 to 255. 255 is going to select everything, so I'd start with a tolerance of maybe 50 and go from there.)

If the background tends to merge seamlessly, you can try to select the background with the Lasso tool. Just start draggine the lasso tool along the background that you will want to change. You can take it in small chunks as long as you hold down the "shift" key when you start your next selection.

Once you have the background of the photo selected, a good idea is often to make the selection just a little bit blurry so that when you change the color the borders won't be too abrubt which tends to look a bit jarring and unreal.

A good way to do this is "feathering" the selection by 5 or 10 pixels (depending on the size and resolution of your photo).

To do this SELECT>FEATHER and choose between 5 or 10 as your feather radius.

Then on to the final step, changing the color of the background.

I'd tend to use IMAGE>ADJUST>HUE/SATURATION.

Once you have the Hue/Saturation dialog box up, click on the "colorize" button and make sure the "preview" button is also checked.

I usually start by increasing the "saturation" slider, this allows more color into the selection, and enables you to see the effects of the top slider, "Hue"

Slide the "Hue" slider until you get the approximate color you want the background of the photo to be. You can then use the middle slider to add more or less of that hue, and the bottom slider to adjust the lightness and darkeness.

Hope this helped,

Philip






Apr 28, 2008 | Adobe Photoshop 7.0 for PC

1 Answer

Changing the amount of time the foreground is on


Try to update with new software if it still wont work then u have a problem with ur batery

Oct 12, 2007 | Samsung SPH-M500 Cellular Phone

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