Question about JBL Creature 2.1 Computer Speakers

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Subwoofer/Bass not working

I have just plugged in my bass/subwoofer. I have configured my computer to 5.1 surround minus centre rear right and rear left. I can make the bass/subwoofer make noise when i click test, but cannot make it do anything playing any type of music on any programs?
pretty sure drivers are up to date and also sound card vista compatible

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  • 209 Answers

I apologize if this question sounds offensive, but did you plug the power adapter in to an electrical outlet? When the power switch is on, do you get any LEDs or an audible thump or hiss from the subwoofer?

Posted on Oct 29, 2017

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icansurf
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SOURCE: speaker/sub bass

If you dare to open up the case, squirt some contact cleaner into the internals of the variable resistor. If none of this makes sense, youre better off taking it to a repair shop.

Posted on Apr 08, 2007

  • 537 Answers

SOURCE: Crackling Sound From Subwoofer

Check any wiring coming or going to the subwoofer. It sounds like it could be a loose connection.  Is there a LFE or bass boost knob on your subwoofer? Does turning that up/down cause the crackling (if it exists). If so, you could use some tuner cleaner to clean the contacts on the potentiometer knob.

If the crackling is on the subwoofer only, it might be damaged from bottoming out.  See if you can remove the baffle or grille covering the woofer and inspect for visual problems. You can also try to lighly push in and out on the subwoofer to hear if it makes any scraping sounds. If so, it is definitely damaged and the driver will have to be replaced.

Mike

Posted on Oct 29, 2007

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: JBL Creature 2.1 Left Speaker not working

Hiya

Too late to resolve the original poster's worries, I can assume, but I arrived here when searching on account of the same problem and resolved it. This is going to sound implausibly condescending, I'm afraid (and excuse th elack of technical terminology!)...

I couldn't get my left speaker to work exactly as above, but then looked carefully at the shape of the respective cables leading to the sub. You have to fit the triangle shape of the lead into the triangular shape of the hole. The speaker CAN be connected what *feels* like correctly, but is in fact connected incorrectly (ie, not all the way in).

This is more a problem with the left speaker than the right since it's a triangle and the right is a square, and can be a little fiddly.

Anyone else experiencing the same problem should probably take a quick moment just to check this isn't it! :)

Posted on Feb 26, 2010

  • 64 Answers

SOURCE: Hi my creature 3 speakers

A wire inside the cable has probably come loose, unless you (or a friend) have decent soldering skills to just replace the wire form the audio controller (most likely spot to have problems) to the PC they are probably just trash.

Posted on May 17, 2011

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I have Denon AVR-2310...but lost operating manual ! In audio set up, more specifically speaker configuration, a choice is given between " FTE", and "FTE +main". What is the...


The manual... http://www.retrevo.com/support/Denon-AVR-2310CI-Receivers-manual/id/23452bh638/t/2/

I'm pretty sure you mean "LFE + Main".

You need to identify the speakers to the receiver as Large or Small regarding their bass-handling capacity more than their actual size.

"LFE" removes the possibly overloading bass in a given speaker channel containing 'small' speakers and sends it to the subwoofer.

"LFE + Main" is sort of explained on page 29 "Bass Setting". The intent of LFE+Main is to task your subwoofer with the bass that ALSO exists on all other speaker channels regardless of their ability to handle it all by themselves. As you can imagine, this might make the subwoofer respond to sonic events that are actually supposed to be directional from, say, the rear channel(s). In that case the event might seem to come from wherever the sub is located instead of the intended direction; or at the very least it might seem to come from both places which is probably not what the sound engineers intended when they recorded the piece.

Having full-range speakers 360-degrees around PLUS a subwoofer, I don't subscribe to the 'bass-is-non-directional' school of thought. If you've ever felt the concussion from and subconsciously glanced toward one of the speakers after, say, a huge explosion, the system is working.

Sep 03, 2011 | Denon Audio Players & Recorders

Tip

How to set up a seven-speaker home theater system


Set up a home theater

How to connect your speakers

In order to deliver surround sound, home theater systems require 5, 6, or even 7 speakers--and that's not even counting the subwoofer. Connecting all those speakers together can be quite a challenge, so here's a quick overview of the basics.

If you don't have an all-in-one, home-theater-in-a-box system, you'll probably need to supply your own speaker cables. There are several different types available--they vary in terms of wire size (or gauges) and termination types. Make sure you pick cable that's a good match for your speakers and receiver. And make sure they're long enough; the rear-channel cables in particular will be stretching all the way around the room.

Once you've selected your system and have all your speakers ready to set up, begin by placing each speaker at or near its intended location. Then, attach the cables to them one by one. After securely fastening one end of the cable to the speaker, connect the other end to the appropriate speaker output on the back of the A/V receiver. Be sure to connect the cable to the correctly labeled output.

For instance, the front-right speaker wire needs to go to the terminal labeled front-right. Also, make sure that each speaker connection is in phase, meaning negative to negative and positive to positive. Otherwise, your system's sound will sound out of whack. Repeat the process for every speaker in your system. Note that the subwoofer uses a coaxial-style RCA cable instead of standard speaker wire.

Once all the wires are connected, you should test the system with several DVDs and CDs, to ensure that everything is in working order.

For our first example, we used an elaborate 7.1-channel system, so it may have 1, 2, or several more speakers than your system. Some systems even employ wireless rear speakers, or virtual surround-surround modes that simulate multichannel experience from 3, 2, or even 1 speaker. And some listeners still prefer good old stereo sound from 2 speakers. No matter what type of speaker setup you prefer, however, the wiring basics remain the same.

How to position surround-sound speakers and a subwoofer
To get the best performance from a surround-sound speaker system, you must install each speaker in the correct location. There are three basic types of surround-sound speaker systems.

  • The 5.1-channel system has five satellite speakers and a subwoofer.

  • 6.1-channel systems have six satellites and a subwoofer.

  • And 7.1-channel systems have seven satellites and a subwoofer.

Start by placing the center speaker either directly above or directly below your TV. The center speaker can be perched atop a direct-view TV or mounted on the wall. Aim the center speaker at ear level.

In most cases, the front-left and front-right speakers can be wall mounted or placed on stands. However, if your speakers have rear-panel bass ports, they should not be wall mounted. Space your front-left and front-right speakers the same distance apart as the distance between your center speaker and your listening position. Position the front-left and front-right speakers no more than two feet above or below the front-center speaker. The tweeters in the front-left and front-right speakers should be roughly at ear level relative to your seating position.

Ideally, the surround-left and surround-right speakers should be mounted on the side walls of your room, slightly behind or parallel to your listening position. If your speakers have rear-panel bass ports, place them on stands instead. If installing the speakers on the side walls isn't practical, you can mount them on the room's rear wall or place them on stands behind your listening position. The surround speakers can be installed up to two feet above the front speakers.

Also, 6.1 surround systems have a back-center speaker. You'll typically mount this on the rear wall of your room, centered behind your seating position. Position the back-center speaker no more than six feet behind the surround-left and surround-right speakers. If your speaker has a rear-panel bass port or if the rear wall is too far behind your seating position, place the back center speaker on a stand instead. The back-center speaker should be installed at the same height as the surround-left and surround-right speakers.

Instead of a single back speaker, 7.1 surround systems use a back-left and a back-right speaker. These, too, are typically mounted on the rear wall of your room. Position the back-left and back-right speakers so that each is approximately aligned with the left and right edges of your listening position. Place the back-left and back-right speakers no more than six feet behind the surround-left and surround-right speakers. If your speakers have rear-panel bass ports,or if the rear wall is too far behind your seating position, place the speakers on stands instead. Install the back-left and back-right speakers at the same height as the surround-left and surround-right speakers.

A subwoofer is the last component of a 5, 6, or 7.1 system. Because bass frequencies are nondirectional, you can place the subwoofer in various locations. You may get the best performance by installing the subwoofer in the front of the room, approximately six inches from the wall. If you want more bass, try placing the sub near a corner in the front of the room.

Connect your DVD player to your A/V receiver--digitally
To hear a movie's soundtrack in surround sound, you must first connect your DVD player to an A/V surround-sound receiver. You'll need to make what is called a multi-channel-compatible connection.

The easiest way to do this is to use a cable that carries a digital signal. There are two digital options: optical and coaxial.

An optical digital connection, also called TosLink, uses pulses of light to deliver a digital signal. According to some experts, one advantage of optical digital connections is that optical cables don't pick up noise, while lower-quality coaxial cables can. Many, but not all, DVD players have an optical output. Most A/V receivers have at least one and usually multiple optical inputs. Plug one end of the optical cable into the DVDs player's optical-out jack. Plug the other end into the receiver's optical input.

Finally, you need to tell your receiver to use the optical connection whenever you switch to the DVD input. This is called assigning the input. Information about this simple process can be found in your A/V receiver's manual.

A second option is a coaxial digital connection. This type of connection is also used for cable TV, but the connectors are different. This type of coaxial cable has an RCA connector. Coaxial cables are less expensive than optical ones. In fact, you can use any old RCA cable to make a coaxial digital connection, and you won't lose any audio quality.

Most, but not all, DVD players, have a coaxial output. Some have coaxial and optical outputs, so you get a choice. Audiophiles argue over which connection is better, but it's very hard to hear the difference. Most A/V receivers have at least one and usually multiple coaxial inputs. Plug one end of the coaxial cable into the DVD player's coaxial-out jack. Plug the other end into the receiver's coaxial input.

Finally, tell your receiver to use the coaxial connection whenever you switch to the DVD input. Again, your A/V receiver's manual will have instructions for assigning an input.

on Aug 13, 2010 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

When I do a noise test I get no sound out of the woofer. I am getting no bass from the woofer


These are "decent" quality 5.1 speakers, usually without any trouble.

Now, to your question, you will not have 5.1 "surround sound" effect with standard sound card, standard sound card will provide only three speakers sound, rear speakers will not connect but bass should be hear. Please switvh power off to the speakers and disconnect all cables from spaekers and connect them for best quality as follows:

1. Audio from PC, orange, green and black connecting to front right speaker.
2. DB15 (D-SUB) connecting to subwoofer, subwoofer is serving as mixer, power board, amplifier and connection box, control pod is just cable connection to it
3. Connect all cables to they respective speakers

Establish location of the speakers, from experience, in ideal world:

1. Sub should be on about your knee level or below, about twice your hight from you.
2. Front centre speaker should be about some distance as sub or bit closer on front and slightly above your head.
3. Front left and right speakers should be at about 45degree from your axis, at distance of about 1.5 your hight and on the level of your head or slightly below.
4. Rear left and right speakers should be located similiary to front speakers, on they level or slightly above them, again, about 45degree from your axis.

Location of the speakers is more actually important than it is assumed, total sound immersion is not possible without proper speakers installation. Head in these instruction meant a location of your head while you are listening to your music or recording not while you are standing.

In reality... hang them higher than your head in four corners of your room, front centre higher than sides, woofer lower than sides and below front centre, if they interfere with each other - increase the distance. I hate reality...

After speakers are connected:
1. Plug power cord in,
2. Turn all sounds totally down, including subwoofer
3. Increase sound on PC to maximum, let play any known to you music, tufftuff or bach, whatever, do not bother with metallica as you cannot discredit on it correct levels.
4. Increase subwoofer volume, holding one hand on the front of the grill till you get some vibration from it
5. Increase sound on centre speaker, then on sides front speakers till you achieve equality of the sound
6. Decrease sound volume on your PC to about 60% - 70%
7. Increse subwoofer volume till you feel sound on your hand in front of the speaker.
8. Increase sound volume on front/rear speakers as required.

Hope that short intro solved all your speaker problems, enjoy! if you require any additional help, do not hesitate to answer to this post with request.

Aug 12, 2010 | Logitech G51 5.1 Multimedia Surround Sound...

4 Answers

I cannot seem to get the driver working on my new computer which has windows 7 currently. Are the two compatible?


Are we looking at this same computers? Since when do you require drivers for speakers?!? Speakers are dumb devices (yes, this is correct name for passive computer devices) and do not require any drivers in any computer or operating system with sound capability! Computer speakers are compatible with any copmuter in the world and any operating system which generate sound!

These speakers are qualified as 5.1, that meant that these speakers will have front bass, front centre speaker, front left and right speaker and rear left and right speaker, in total six speakers.

Please follow this advice and you will have joy of surround sound.

1. Mount your subwoofer in front centre, below your knee level at the distance of about 2 of your hights
2. Mount your centre speaker in the centre on your head/hight level or slightly above at same distance as subwoofer or slightly closer.
3. Mount left front speaker about 45degree from your centre line to the left and right same distance to your right, on the level of your head while you are listening to the music, distance from you slightly closer (about 1/2 your hight) than your centre speaker.
4. Mount your rear left and right speakers at same or slightly greater distance as front left and right speaker. these should be at same or slightly higher level as front speakers.
5. Triple 3.5mm jack is going to your computer output and your speakers (incidently, your subwoofer servers as junction box, amplifier and mixer).
6. Connect speakers to they respective jacks.
7. Turn power on speakers all way down
8. Connect power to the speakers and switch it on
9. Play some music on your computer, output on full, music recommended will be some classic, like bach or similar
10. Put your hand in front of subwoofer and turn bass till you feel vibration
11. Turn sound till you hear it well
12. Turn sound on the computer down till about 70% - 80%
13. Turn on sound on your speakers till desired level and enjoy the experience!

If you have still some problems, these can be then related to the drivers installed on your computer, please check therefore what motherboard do you have, if there is proper sound drivers installed. If not, go to the site of our motherboard/sound card manufacturer and install relevant drivers.

Please do not hesitate to ask me if you have any addtional problem related to this particular issue.

Aug 06, 2010 | Creative Labs Inspire T5400 Computer...

1 Answer

5.1 surround sound system


perhaps you wired the subwoofer backwards, you got the positive and the negative mixed up on one of the speakers

Dec 26, 2009 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

I get no bass sound from sub-Woofer connected to Yamaha RX-V465


Check your speaker settings in Setup menu / Speaker Setup / Manual / Config (and then in this submenu also Equalizer).
In Config, choose where should low frequency sound go - subwoofer and/or front speakers (if they are big enough). The settings are: Bass Out: SWFR/Front/Both.
Also check Subwoofer phrase in SWFR Phase.
Check settings of all speakers, they can be Large / Small / None. If small, frequencies lower than "Crossover" settings, will not be put on them.

Nov 13, 2009 | Yamaha Rx-v465/rxv465 Home Theater...

1 Answer

5.1 surround sound


Here is how you fix it. Its really easy actually take a look at your Subwoofer 99% of the time you can control two controls for your bass somewhere around the Subwoofer. If you raise the volume of your Subwoofer you'll get more bass. Try it and let me know how this works out for you alright.

Oct 03, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Help


Hi Cassie, unless your receiver is a surround reciever, it won't have an actual subwoofer output. The good news is that you can use either a "line out" jack or a "tape out" jack instead, which most receivers do have. These jacks always have the signal, so there are no special settings to remember - simply operate your receiver as usual. Everything comes out of these jacks, not just the bass - but it won't matter since your subwoofer will only reproduce the bass frequencies. The bass information is generally identical in both left and right channels, so either the right or left jack should work fine, and it's okay to leave the other one unconnected. The only bad thing is the line and tape outputs are not affected by the receiver's bass and treble controls, so you'll have to control the bass volume at the subwoofer if it has a control. If you can't control the amount of bass you hear, turn up the volume and reduce the treble which will give the illusion of more bass. I'm assuming you have "powered" subwoofer (has its own built-in amplifier). Good luck!

Jun 22, 2008 | Bose Acoustimass 15 System

1 Answer

No signal on subwoofer out in Onkyo TX-SR703(E) - similar to TX-SR803


Hey Tad, I have the same problem and perhaps a solution. I just moved to the other SW "pre-out" and it seems to be working..the green light is on . Whatever works i guess.

Jan 24, 2008 | Onkyo TX-SR703 Receiver

1 Answer

Surround Sound Center Speaker/Sound Card issue


You need to use a digital interface cable between the sound card and the speakers to get all of the 6 channels to work properly.

Sep 24, 2006 | Inland 58019 ThunderSound 5.1 PCI Sound...

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