Question about Drywall

2 Answers

How long does it take to hang, tape, mud and finish a sheet of drywall

Posted by on

  • Jake Gibson
    Jake Gibson Feb 03, 2016

    Rodney, great question about how long it takes to hang and texture drywall. It seems like this process could vary depending on the size, scope, and weather. I would also assume that you'd want to get good sheet-rock from a reputable dealer. http://www.westgyp.com.au

×

Ad

2 Answers

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 20 times.

  • Expert
  • 156 Answers

2 or 3 days, plus or minus depending on how fast the mud dries.

Posted on Apr 30, 2015

  • Jim Parker
    Jim Parker May 29, 2016

    Only a matter of seconds if its 1 sheet and you have done it for years. Its my trade! :)

  • Rabbit Brains
    Rabbit Brains May 02, 2017

    It can dry quicker if you add some (small amount) of plaster of Paris in the compound mix.

×

Ad
  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    Hot-Shot:

    An expert who has answered 20 questions.

    Corporal:

    An expert that has over 10 points.

    Mayor:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 2 times.

  • Contributor
  • 26 Answers

If you are diligent it could take 2 to 3 days depending on weather conditions and your pluckiness (can't use the work de$ire??) to complete the work. Me, myself, it takes years. But then I don't like doing it.

Posted on Apr 30, 2015

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of.(from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones)
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

My 2012 wall air condioner is leaking. How do I fix this and repair the drywall?


It sounds like the drain line is plugged where it goes outdoors, so water is backing up inside the unit until it spills over indoors. Clear the drain line.

You may need to cut a section out of the drywall where it's been damaged, then get a matching piece of new drywall to replace it. If you can cut down the centers of two studs, all the better - then you can screw the new patch directly to the studs on both sides. If not... at least leave yourself a couple of inches of drywall to stitch to - you can do that by screwing small pieces of plywood to the existing drywall, overlapping the hole. Then you can screw the new drywall patch to the plywood.

Next is your adventure in taping & mudding & sanding the drywall to finish the patch. Last, paint it to match the rest of the wall... or repaint all of that wall, including the patch. No need to paint adjacent walls, if your color matching is pretty close.

Jul 26, 2014 | Samsung MH052FNCA 18000 BTU High Wall 410A...

Tip

Fiberglass/Mesh Tape Mythe


I've heard people say many times, " When I finished the drywall on my room addition, I used Mesh Tape
www.all-wall.com/Categories/Fiberglass-Mesh-Drywall-Tape/Thin-Drywall-Mesh-Tape

on my seams and inside corners". Well, I would strongly recommend that you use Paper Tape instead:
www.all-wall.com/Categories/Drywall-Joint-Tape

along with All-Purpose Compound: www.usg.de/index.php?id=1357

Even though Fiberglass/Mesh Tape is much easier to apply than Paper Tape, you should not use it because it has a greater tendency to crack when applied to New Drywall seams; unless you use Easy Sand 45, 90, or 220.
www.lowes.com/pd_11778-325-384210_4294864808+4294851233_4294937087_?productId=3009562&Ns=p_product_prd_lis_ord_nbr'0''p_product_quantity_sold'1&pl=1&currentURL=%2Fpl_SHEETROCK%2BBrand_4294864808%2B4294851233_4294937087_%3FNs%3Dp_product_prd_lis_ord_nbr'0''p_product_quantity_sold'1

The different numbers ( 45, 90, 220) indicate the amount of time, ( in minutes), that you have to work with this material before it starts setting up on you. TIP: I would not recommend this material if you are a beginner! The consistency of this material varies as time goes on, becoming thicker and thicker.

Mesh Tape is good for many other uses though. Such as, a fracture in the drywall, patching around electrical boxes, applying to corner bead as a strengthening material, or removing old tape and re-taping old rough seams in a rehab house.

Good Luck!

If you should have any questions about"Drywall Finishing/Patching", or know someone who does, put your questions to Category:"Tools- Building & Power-HAND TOOLS" at FixYa.com

I will do my best to answer your questions about drywall finishing. However, it would be best if we could speak on the PHONE or do a live CHAT. I can answer any question you have if it involves getting a wall ready for paint!

Thanks for looking,

Jim

Key Words: Drywall/Sheetrock/Gypsum Wallboard

on Sep 29, 2010 | Hand Tools

Tip

Drywall Tip!!!!!!Rrepair ti yourself


If for some reason A hole becomes appearent and a Man or women have to fix it.......... Mud around The hole with a light coat of drywall compound and then put the screem mesh drywall tape in plece.Let it set.Remember to cover the hole diamenter with tape and mud in all edges to be uniform. Let set till dry and white and smoothly apply another coat without leaving streaks of mud. Last coat..........put a little water in a ice-cream tub or something of this nature and add drywall compound to make something to the nature of a pancake batter and feather out the edgesof your best mud job that you ever did, let dry and lightly wash down with sand-paper and get ultiment resaults every time..Prime and paint.

on Aug 21, 2010 | Audio Players & Recorders

3 Answers

What can replace that tape, if i can't find it what i can use ineteat


just go to any hardware store and buy any drywall mesh tape on that width (2" - 50mm) and approximately same length (50yds to 60yds), virtually all of them have same internal diameter, therefore you should not have any problem with putting it into the dispenser.

do not bother with brandname! generic tape work as well and is half the price! tapeis glued only to tack to the wall, then mud is holding it.

Dec 17, 2013 | Dap 9140 - Drywall Mesh Tape, 2 In x 60...

1 Answer

How do I repair a large hole in my drywalled wall in my living room that is right beside the door frame?


If you live near a Home Depot or Lowes they sell partial sheets of drywall. Cut a square slightly larger than the damaged area from the new drywall. Trace this around the damaged area and then cut out the damaged area with a key hole saw or sawzaw or if you don't have those just your utility knife. You can probably buy all the tools and materials for a lot less than hiring someone. Since you said the hole is next to a door you shouldn't have to worry about electrical wires, but just in case, take a flashlight and look into the hole before you cut to make sure. Now you should have a hole the size and shape of the new piece you cut. The area against the door is against studs and you'll have to just keep cutting with your knife until you get through to the wood. Now, on the other side of the hole across from the door take a piece of scrap wood and put it inside the hole and press it against the inside of the wall so half the scrap wood is behind the wall and the other half is exposed in the hole. While you're holding the scrap wood you'll need to screw 1 1/4" drywall screws through the existing drywall and into the scrap wood. The scrap wood should now be tight against the back of the drywall and partially exposed to resemble the stud on the other side by the door jamb. Now you have backing for your patch. Place the patch you cut earlier in the hole and screw it in place. A screw gun or drill with #2 philips head screw tip will make this job easier. The screws should be counter sunk just slightly so the heads don't rip the paper. If you do rip the paper you'll need to put in another screw near that one or else you'll have problems later, especially near a door. Now finish the hole with joint compound. You can buy this at most hardware stores in a one gallon bucket. You'll need a role of drywall tape as well. I recommend the fiberglass mesh tape for ease. Also you'll need a taping 6" taping knife and a tray.
Fill the joint compound tray half way and mix it around with your knife until smooth. Take the fiberglass tape and stick it to the wall around the patch to cover where you cut. Spread a thick layer of joint compound over the fiberglass tape and then gently wipe it all off with one or two strokes. Repeat this until all the tape is covered with a thin layer of "mud" (joint compound). Make sure all the screw holes get filled too. Let this dry for several hours, maybe overnight. Put the excess mud back in the bucket and clean your tools. When the first coat is dry take your 6" taping knife and scrape away any blobs of mud that you left behind from the first coat and then apply a second coat. You may need a third coat. Sand the joint compound until smooth tapering the edges to the paper. Again, be careful not to sand the paper too much, you don't want to go through. If you have smooth walls, you're in luck, now just paint. If you have textured walls then you have more work. you can get spray texture in an aerosol can at the hardware store. Read the instructions on the can and practice on the left over drywall from your patch. Note: you'll never make a perfect match with this aerosol texture but you can get it close. The only way to get a perfect match is to use a compressor and and special spray gun for joint compound and it takes some practice. You can rent these things in most towns if you're very particular. Good luck

Aug 09, 2013 | Tools & Hardware - Others

Tip

Fixing textured (not popcorn) drywall ceiling


If you've got a house built in the 90's, you may well have a textured drywall ceiling with a pattern on it. The most common pattern is a blossom texture with patterns of repeating ridges form circles.

The problem comes when you have to repair this ceiling. Knowing how to duplicate the texture is the problem.

Here are the steps to do this:

Replace/repair drywall ceiling until the surface is paint ready, but do not paint. Sand texture off of some of the adjoining ceiling to avoid a visible border.

Make sure you have a drop cloth down!!! This might drip.

Mix drywall mud down to the consistence of pancake batter. You want it stiff enough not to drip, but pliable enough to texture. The mixture should just barely be pourable.

Pour into a paint roller pan, and using a long nap roller with the lint removed (use masking tape) roll the joint compound onto the repaired area.

Allow to set for a few moments to make sure it won't drip Now get out your stomping (yeah, that's what they call it) tool, and texture the ceiling.

You can buy brushes to "stomp" your ceiling at many paint stores, but they aren't cheap. Instead, you can do what most drywall guys do, and make your own. Go to the store and get an old fashioned string mop. When selecting the mop, look at the head. Some have a rectangular bar holding the strings in place, and some have a round tab, about the size of a quarter. You want the one with the round tab, and get one with strings, not cloth strips.

When you get it home, hold the mop up to the ceiling, and note how long the strings need to be to create the same size pattern. Cut your strings about two inches longer, since the whole string does not hit the ceiling.

Trim the strings to the correct length, then soak the mop for 24 hours to limber them up.

Now back to the stomping. Once you have your drywall mud applied, all you have to do is hold the mop over your head, upside down, straight up, with the strings hanging uniformly around the sides. The mop should be damp, but not wet. You can add a bit of drywall mud to it first if you wish, I do not.

Hold the mop about eight inches below your drywall, and starting at an edge where you can judge where to match the old pattern, "stomp" the mop into the wet mud, just like you were stomping your foot. Immediately pull the mop back, and you should have the same pattern as your ceiling.

Continue stomping until you've covered the ceiling. Afterward, you can wash the mop, and keep it for later if you think you will need it.

Tips:
After stomping, let it dry for at least two days before painting.
When you buy your drywall joint compound, look at the prices. You can often get a five gallon bucked for only a couple of dollars more than a gallon. (I always buy pre-mixed, it works great). To preserve the mud you didn't use, after you're done with it, mix a teaspoon of bleach into a cup of water. Level the surface of the mud in the bucket, then pour a layer of the bleach/water mix on top. This will keep the mud from drying or molding.

.

on Dec 30, 2009 | Hand Tools

Tip

Patching a hole in drywall/sheetrock


The best way to patch a hole when you don't have backing material is as follows:

Step 1: Cut the hole out square with a keyhole saw or utility knife:
www.all-wall.com/s.nl/sc.11/.f?search=keyhole+saw

Step 2: Cut a piece of drywall, (the same thickness as the wall that you are working on), to fit fairly tightly into square hole. (HINT: You don't want the patch to fit so tight that it breaks the corners when you try to put it in.) If done properly, this patch will not want to stay in the hole by itself. You must leave 1/32nd of an inch all the way around the patch. Once the patch has been properly fitted, you are now ready to start taping it in.

Step 3: Put the patch face down on the floor or table so that you can easily work on it. Using drywall mud/compound & the 5" knife, lightly mud the back side of the patch (www.all-wall.com/Categories/Joint-Knives/Hyde-Stainless-Hammer-Head). Place a piece of drywall tape over the patch, allowing it to hang over the edge of the patch about 1 1/2" on the top/bottom of the patch (paper tape flaps).(www.tooldistrict.com/2inx500ftpaperjointtapepn500bypermaglas-mesh.aspx) Holding the tape firmly against the patch, wipe down the tape with the 5" knife.

Step 4: Once the piece of tape is wiped down, you are now ready to apply mud to the section of wall where the paper tape flaps will be laying. Place the patch over the hole, tapping it into place until the patch is laying flat on the wall. Holding your fingers on the seams of the patch, wipe down the first paper flap, and then the other. (HINT: Always wipe down the top flap first, then the bottom flap. Make sure the patch is flush with the wall, or recessed slightly. If the patch is sticking out from the wall even a little bit, it will be very difficult to hide!)

Step 5: Now that the patch is in, mud the horizontal seams in, paper tape, and wipe down. Repeat the process for the vertical seams. (NOTE: You may use mesh tape on these seams if you wish because mesh is a little thinner than the paper tape; making it a little easier to cover on the next two coats. Don't make a special purchase if you don't already have some laying around, it's not worth it. ( www.all-wall.com/Categories/Fiberglass-Mesh-Drywall-Tape/Thin-Drywall-Mesh-Tape )Let this dry for 12 hours before coating again.

Step 6: For the next coat you will need a 10 " broad knife (www.all-wall.com/Categories/Taping-Knives-Stainless-Steel/Hyde-Maxxgrip-Extruded-Back) Apply mud to the patch, covering the tape from the previous application.You will need to leave more mud around the outside of the patch; not too much on top of the tape. It is already going to be a little high on top of the tape so you are basically creating an optical illusion by building up around the patch. Let this coat dry 24 hours.

Step 7: If the 2nd coat was done properly, then putting a finish coat, (3rd and final coat), won't be a problem. This coat is just to fill in any low spots that you weren't able to get completely full the last coat. And if you did get it full the last time, congrats, then it is just a skim coat to fill in any air bubbles that may exist. (NOTE: Whenever patching over an already painted wall, the drywall mud/compound will bubble. This is normal. After 2nd coat of mud drys, scrape off the air bubbles before applying the next coat.) Let this coat dry for 12-24 hours

Step 8: Now the fun part begins: Use a sanding sponge or a sanding pole to sand the patch off, (http://www.all-wall.com/acatalog/A000_Dustless_Sanding_20.php). Then it is ready for paint!!

Good Luck!

If you should have any questions about"Drywall Finishing/Patching", or know someone who does, put your questions to Category:"Tools- Building & Power-HAND TOOLS" at FixYa.com

I will do my best to answer your questions about drywall finishing, but as you can see, just a simple patch is very involved. However, it would be best if we could speak on the PHONE or do a live CHAT. I can answer any question you have if it involves getting a wall ready for paint!

Jim

Key Words: Drywall/Sheetrock/Gypsum Wallboard, Patching, Texturing, Speckling, & Paper Tape

on Dec 01, 2009 | Hand Tools

1 Answer

How to put tape and putty on drywall


The TapeBuddy drywall taping tool is the answer to your taping problem. A one step drywall tape and joint compound application tool that makes taping easy. It's lightweight, easy to assemble and applies an even amount of joint compound directly to the joint tape. It even applies more compound to the tape center where more compound is needed. Just load with paper or Fibafuse tape and joint compound, pull out the coated tape, cut, apply to the seam and embed. There is no need to pre-mud drywall joints or carry around heavy tools. Taping walls, corners and ceilings is fast with no mess. TapeBuddy is a great DIY tool that will give you professional results. It is easy-to-use and the perfect tool for any drywall taping project.
The tool comes with easy-to-understand How To information on taping drywall. There is a how to manual on their website.

Jun 10, 2013 | Drywall

1 Answer

How dom i remove shelves that were put up with wood glue without taking half the wall with it?


If wood glue is adhered to a painted surface, and the paint is adhered to sheetrock ... you are not facing good news.

I painted and did sheetrock for years.
Here's how I'd handle the problem.

Use sharp utility knife and cut through the sheetrock paper around object that is glued.
Once the paper is cut, you can tear off glued item and it will remove as little of the wall as possible.

Next, but some sheetrock mud.
But not your usual type.
Get the powered bag that you mix with water.
They make 15 minute set up, and 45 minute, etc.
Don't buy paper drywall tape for this job.
Buy the fiberglass tape that looks like a screen.
Clean up you wall so it's smooth.
Use knife to cut a taper edge around each broken area of sheetrok >>> this will keep the edges down so they're not sticking up
Mix up the drywall mud so its like toothpaste.
Apply mud into wall damage.
Here's the trick ... do not build it up so you have to sand it off.
Keep it low.
Put the mud on the wall.
Push the tape into the mud.
It won't be perfect.
Smooth as much as possible using your 6" drywall knife.
Do the project in stages.
Let it dry.
Take your 6" mud knife and use it like a spatula to scrape down the high points.
Keep it low so you're not sanding.
Mix more mud.
Apply a THIN coat over repair.
Let it dry.
Scrape it again with the mud knife.

Bring a table lamp over to where you're working.
Put the table lamp up close to the wall so the light casts across the repair.
The light will let you see the high and low points in the repair
Keep floating mud in very THIN coats until the wall is smooth
Put a coat of paint over repair.
Use the light again to look for dips and weaves in the surface.
Smooth it out with the mud
Paint the wall.

If you get stuck in the project, answer back and I'll give words of encouragement.

Oct 25, 2010 | Garden

2 Answers

Drywall hole


cut the drywall, square,from the center of one stud to the center of the next stud and remove. Now cut a new piece to fit and nail or screw in place. Tape the joints with mesh tape and coat with drywall mud. Use a ten inch broad knife for this. One coat of mud and let dry. Next day another coat of mud pull it tight this time and let dry Sand and apply desired texture

Jun 18, 2010 | Saws

Not finding what you are looking for?
Drywall Logo

Related Topics:

946 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Drywall Experts

Tim Hunt
Tim Hunt

Level 2 Expert

53 Answers

ray gallant

Level 3 Expert

46448 Answers

Bill Boyd

Level 3 Expert

45620 Answers

Are you a Drywall Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...