Question about Behringer Ultratone K3000fx 300w Keyboard Amplifier New

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Something blew during a loud performance and now it produces continual high-freq feedback that can't be controlled.

Is it possible the low speaker is blown, or am I so lucky that this is only a fuse?

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The speaker may be blown, but if you're getting continual Hi-freq feedback that is not resolved by lowering the volume know, you need to take this to the repair shop.

Posted on Apr 29, 2015

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The lamp bulb fusing is just on the horns. Check the Black Widows individually with an ohm meter for continuity. If the speakers themselves test OK, you most likely blew the crossovers. Peavey service (877-732-8391) can rebuild most of therir crossovers in house and they generally are cheaper to fix than replace.

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You need to check the actual signal levels to make sure they are within the specs for the unit. The mic input is low impedance. Your mic should be like a Shure SM58 or equivalent. The output is fairly high... up to +14DB which will require you to turn down the trims on a mixer this runs into or set a -20Db pad at the input. I suspect your distortion is from the device output to the mixer input. It is VERY important that the mic does NOT "hear" the speakers as the feedback loop resulting will be mass distortion. The guitar should also not "hear" the mains.

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If the guitar can "hear" a speaker that is driven by it then it will feedback if gain is set high enough (doesn't take much). The guitar makes a wonderful microphone. Often you can actually see the strings vibrate while feedback is in progress. Keep the speakers facing away from these guitars to reduce the chance of feedback. Sometimes you can increase the threshold before feedback by using your EQ on the amp. The acoustic guitars are FAR more susceptible to this than the solid body electrics..

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When we are trying to get a reasonable level of sound for vocals before it gets loud enough to be able to hear clearly with the band playing it starts to clip at the speakers now we are only using this set...


Proper level setting of the mixer is important. HOWEVER if the clipping is occuring at the speakers the only possible problem MIGHT be that you have a supersonic feedback that is saturating the speakers above your hearing range, Be sure you don't boost the highs too much with the EQ as this can cause the feedback that you can't hear. Also make sure that you power the speakers from the SAME receptacle as the mixer, even if it means running an extension cord to bring power to the mixer. This is to avoid a low frequency hum and common mode distortion/damage. A low frequency hum could cause the clipping.
It would be a good idea to get a sound meter to check the sound level. You should be able to reach 85 Db from this system without clipping. If you need more than that, you MAY need more speakers if the band instruments are too loud. Also if the band has amps that get into the vocal microphones that adds to the clipping level... make sure the mics don't "hear" the band instruments. Make sure your speakers are toward the audience from the mics to avoid the supersonic feedback problem. If the vocalists can't hear themselves with that configuration you need to set up seperate stage monitors.

There are some pretty good videos on YouTube about proper mixer level setup.

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You MAY be overdriving the sound card. Near flat should work for vocal, but setting the levels throughout the mixer is important as well as the sound card. You can use the LOW CUT to reduce hum if you have noisy system. Describing balancing the levels is more than I can do here. There are many good videos about mixer setup on YouTube.com. You cannot "fix" problems created by improper levels and noise injected into the system using the EQ.
What is important is to see that all gain controls and faders are around mid range to 70% when operating normally. You should be using BALANCED lines everywhere possible either XLR or TRS cables. ALL interconnected equipment should be powered from the same receptacle or power source INCLUDING all amps and powered speakers. Often users use unbalanced lines from mixers to sound boards and pick up noise or they have the levels set wrong between the mixer and sound board resulting in clipping and distortion or poor signal-to-noise ratio.

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I have a Korg C-15s and also experiencing loud crackling sounds when I turn it on. The problems seems to be either the sliding volume control or the amplifier itself. Honestly though, I believe the issue is the volume control. I opened my piano to get a closer look and attempted to clean the contacts on the volume. Unfortunately after cleaning the contacts, the crackling sounds became somewhat worse. After I turn the piano on, the volume control is generally rendered useless......volume set to low volume and the noise is quite loud and other times the volume control is set high and get very low volume crackling noise. No real consistency. The noise does diminish after a few minutes but so does the piano sounds to an inaudible level. There were a couple of instances where I turned it on and surprising enough, no no noise and perfect sound. For these reasons I believe the issue is within the volume control and not so much the amplifier. I have an electronics background and noticed that the volume control is very unique in design and is not something that can be substituted with another volume control from other sources.

My recommendation is to check the sound quality of the audio from the RCA L/R audio outs on rear of the piano by connecting to a stereo receiver. If it sounds fine you're in luck. If the crackling sound does not diminish after a few minutes like mine does, I would suggest disconnecting the internal speakers and using the audio out only. You can connect a pair of studio monitors or high quality computer speakers, preferably with a small subwoofer to deliver the full audio range and deeper tone of a real piano. I'm currently using a basic pair of Logitech computer speakers and is quite acceptable until I can afford a high quality set of monitors or relocate my piano closer to my high quality Yamaha receiver.

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Crate TX50 DB has noisy DSP circuit when rotating the DSP pot!


When you are changing the DSP effect on the fly, static or noise is NORMAL !!! The DSP is changing the data and having to recalculate on the fly and doesn't mute itself while doing so which results in "garbage sounds out".

The bypass setting should NOT get any tone UNLESS you have feedback going on. If your guitar can "hear" the speakers in the amp, the strings can vibrate and get feedback going.

Unplug the guitar and see if high freq tone is still there on bypass. If the tone is in the musical range, then there is a problem if nothing is plugged in. If it is a VERY weak, very high frequency tone, this may be the digitizing noise from the DSP. On bypass, the audio is likely to still go through the DSP, just not be modified by it.

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The speakers are 8 ohm so you can probably get near the 400 Watt per side when connected to this mixer. You don't need bridge mode to get this and I would recommend not using it anyway. Whatever you do make sure the speakers don't get disconnected when running at high volumes as you will arc out the amp in the mixer... I know this as I fix them... I have two PMP5000's that I repaired. Lots of work to repair...

The feedback is NOT the fault of the mixer or speakers but instead of something picking up sound from the speakers and sending back to the mixer.

The mic must be well in back of the speakers (say at least 10 feet) to avoid this or you need to use anti-feedback hardware to avoid the problem or highly directional close talking mics. Reverberation off walls can also get back to mics and cause problem. I was able to use a wireless Peavey mic which seemed to disrupt the phase enough to never get into an oscillation even when in front of the speakers.

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Amplifier Screech at High Volume


What you're hearing is FEEDBACK caused by the nearness of the guitar to the amplifier speaker. Always mute it when not in use, or don't move it close to the guitar amplifier speaker when unmuted.

Usually, even though you hear a high-pitched screech, the problem is actually caused by low frequencies, sometimes below the human hearing threshhold (i.e., subsonic) because they are more omnidirectional and thus more easily easily can loop between input (the guitar pickup, especially on a hollow-body guitar) and output (the speaker). The screech frequency is determined by the distance between input and output, determining how quickly the output reaches the input (then loops around through the amplifier). Therefore, reducing the BASS a bit will often alleviate some of the problem.

This is basically the same type of feedback heard when a microphone is turned up too loudly or the mic is pointed at the PA speaker. Avoid those actions and your feedback will be minimized.

Only time and experience will allow you to automatically take actions to avoid feedback. I worked in the San Francisco Bay Area as a manager and sound man for rock bands and several nightclubs for 22 years. My college major was Physics (which includes acoustics).

Keep on rockin'!

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Yep, chalk that one up to poor design...The amplifiers are going out of balance during power up and down. Two seconds is pretty long... Try turning down the gain during power on and see if that affects it.

The pop on turning off is normal... None of these have speaker disconnecting hardware that is necessary for very high power amps. The biggies have hardware that checks amplifier is balanced before connecting the speakers and a relay also cuts the speakers immediatley on power down. As power goes up and down the circuitry comes to equilibrium and until it does, strange things happen.

I would investigate the CONDITION of the filter caps for the main power because if they age to a higher internal resistance that COULD cause the high freq oscillation on power up... Two seconds is MUCH too long.

There should also be some non-electrolytic caps NEAR the power output transistors to handle high frequency supply power bypassing.

Check the power bypasses that service the preamp stages. Look for pregnant electrolytic caps that have failed.

Ultimately, you MAY need an oscilloscope to isolate the high freq problem.

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