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Legacy LA1020 Low Sound, No Bass

Amp powers on, all wiring is correct, i can hear sound but there is very little bass. i checked and adjusted the gain. It acts like it doesnt have enough power to drive the sub. I have a legacy LA1020, 4ch. Bridgeable. With (1) 10 inch Kicker Competition. The sub is good, the deck is good. the amp was given to me by a friend, he told me what it was doing and said to try it in my truck, and i got the same result.

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Look of rca cable is good

Posted on Aug 01, 2008

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Have you checked the amp? there should be a switch on it to alow you to change the input of the power, it could be that this is on very low, causing not alot of noise and base to be produced. it could also be the remote lead to your head unit or that it isnt earthed in the best of places. if the amp power is on then you can probably say its not the earth, try checking over the amp for a switch to turn up the input, if not check the user manual and look for amp settings.

cheers, adam

Posted on Nov 18, 2007


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No sound from tweeter bx5a

First of all, never connect the audio from your receiver directly to the tweeter. You can blow the tweeter instantly. The mid-bass driver can be damaged from a direct connection as well.

Since you get absolutely no sound from either driver, this seems to implicate the crossover. If the crossover has opened, no signal gets through, if it has opened early in the signal path.

But, it is also possible that a short exists, and that perhaps your amp cuts off the output having sensed a short. The short could be in the crossover or one of the drivers.

Here are some troubleshooting tips--

To prevent damage to your amp, turn it off while making or breaking any connections inside the speaker boxes.

Write down which wires get connected to which place on the drivers, so you can get them back where they belong.

With your amp turned off, connect the bad speaker to your amp. You've already verified that no sound is produced when both drivers are connected.

So, with your amp off, disconnect one wire from the tweeter in the bad box.

Briefly turn your amp on and listen for sound.

If you get sound, the tweeter is shorted.

If you get no sound, with the amp off, reconnect the tweeter in the bad box and disconnect one wire from the mid-bass driver.

Briefly turn the amp on and listen before turning the amp off.

If you get sound now, but not before, the mid-bass driver is shorted.

If you got no sound either way, check the DC resistance of the mid-bass driver (only, not the tweeter. Ohmmeters put out a small DC voltage to test resistance. That DC voltage might damage a tweeter, maybe. Don't risk it). Ohm the mid-bass driver while it is not connected to the crossover. If the driver is good, you should read some ohms--a little less than the stated impedance. An 8 ohm driver might read 6.5 ohms, for instance. If you get an open or a short (with the crossover disconnected from the mid-bass driver) you have a blown driver. Two actually, since neither the tweeter nor the mid-bass driver produced any sound in the previous tests.

If you can't get ahold of an ohmmeter, try this--

Open the good, working speaker and place the two side by side.

Connect your amp to the bad speaker box only.

With your amp turned off, disconnect the wires from the mid-bass driver in the bad box and connect them to the mid-bass driver in the good box. Disconnect one of the wires from the "good" mid-bass driver first, so you don't have two crossovers connected to it at the same time--even if only one of them will get powered on. It keeps the confusion down to a minimum when trying to isolate your problem. Oh, and disconnect one wire from the bad tweeter, in case it is shorted.

Turn the amp on and listen briefly before turning the amp off.

If you got sound, the "bad" crossover is fine, but the "bad" mid-bass driver is blown. And, since you got no sound in the previous tests, the "bad" tweeter is blown, as well.

If you got no sound, try it the other way around. Meaning--

With the amp off, disconnect the speaker wires coming from your amp from the bad speaker box and connect them to the good speaker box.

Your amp is now connected only to the good speaker box.

With the amp still off, connect the mid-bass wires from the good box to the mid-bass driver in the bad box. Remember to disconnect one of the "bad" crossover wires from its own driver first, so only one crossover is connected to the "bad" mid-midbass driver. Remember to disconnect one wire from the "good" and "bad" tweeters, so the only sound you hear--if any--is from the "bad" mid-bass driver, powered by the "good" crossover.

If this produces sound, but the previous attempts failed, you have a crossover problem.

If you still get no sound, something went wrong and you need to retest the good speaker by itself and back up a few steps and try again.

Assuming you got sound from the "good" crossover while it was driving your "bad" mid-bass, make sure no wires have come loose inside the "bad" box. Assuming you have sound connections at each end of each wire, you now need to desolder the electrolytic capacitors from the circuit board.

Make sure you mark them first, so you can put them back where they belong.

You can remove only one at a time, if that helps.

Use an ohmmeter to check some components.

The big red coil should read pretty close to a short, maybe one ohm.

The capacitors should read open or infinite resistance, although you might see a steadily increasing resistance while the capacitor charges up from the ohmmeter. If you read a steady low resistance on a capacitor after it has been removed from the circuit board, that capacitor is bad and must be replaced. The markings on the capacitor should give you some clues as to the proper replacement.

All things considered, I suspect that your problem is a shorted electrolytic capacitor. But, I gave you all I could think of so you can narrow it down and isolate the problem, whatever it might be.

I hope this helps.

Feb 23, 2011 | M-Audio BX5a Speaker

1 Answer

It comes on but no base sound and wont turn up

You have to fill in the details about what you're feeding it (the source and how IT's set up). It won't just >>create<< bass.

From the manual:

If you used the high-level (speaker) inputs and there
is no sound from any of the speakers:
• Check that receiver/amplifier is on and a source is playing.
• Check that powered subwoofer is plugged into an active electrical outlet and is switched on.
• Check all wires and connections between
receiver/amplifier and speakers. Make sure all wires
are connected. Make sure none of the speaker wires are
frayed, cut or punctured.
• Review proper operation of your receiver/amplifier.

If there is low (or no) bass output:
• Make sure the connections to the left and right “Speaker
Inputs” have the correct polarity (+ and –).
• Make sure that the subwoofer is plugged into an active electrical outlet and switched on.
• Adjust the crossover point.
• Flip the Phase Control switch to the opposite position.
• If you are using a Dolby Digital/DTS receiver or processor, make sure that the subwoofer adjustments on the receiver/processor are set up correctly.
• Slowly turn the Level Control clockwise until you begin to hear the desired amount of bass.

If you used the line-level inputs and there is no sound
from the subwoofer:
• Check that receiver/amplifier is on and a source is playing.
• Check that powered subwoofer is plugged into an active electrical outlet and is switched on.
• Check all wires and connections between receiver/amplifier and subwoofer. Make sure all wires are connected. Make sure none
of the wires are frayed, cut or punctured.
• Review proper operation of your receiver/amplifier.
• Slowly turn the Level Control clockwise until you begin to hear the desired amount of bass.
• Make sure that you have configured your receiver/processor so that the subwoofer/LFE output is on.

Apr 07, 2010 | JBL PB12 Subwoofer

1 Answer

I have a 1800 watt amp but the red light is on but it dose sound like the bass works but not it its prime

the red light is for power in protect mode it should be orange and it will not emmit sound if you think you should have better sounding bass or more bass you can try to play with the gains on the amp or possibly if you have the negative or positive hooked up wrong from a speaker to the amp this will cause the bass to be lower and somewhat distorted double check your positive and negative wires from the speaker to the amp and make sure they are correct

Feb 28, 2010 | Kenwood KAC-9152D Car Audio Amplifier

2 Answers

Amp is on, but sub wont produce any bass

Make sure the subwoofer is set to low frequency, make sure subwoofer and bass are enabled on the headdeck. Make sure the gain is turned up on the amp, make sure the rcas haven't come out of the back of the head deck.

Aug 04, 2009 | JBL GTO14001 Car Amp

2 Answers

Legacy Amp 2600 watt HELP

Hello e_cody_e,

The settings you have will not break anything and may sound OK.

But they may not be optimum for getting the best bass from your system. The SubSonic setting filters out frequencies below the threshold of hearing allowing the amp to put more power into the frequencies that can be heard. So, it should be set to about the same frequency that your enclosure is tuned for or just a little lower. If your enclosure is tuned for 35Hz, then the subsonic should be close to maximum.

Similarily, the low pass sends all frequencies below the setting to the subs, (other than those blocked by the subsonic filter) and is commonly referred to as the "crossover" frequency. Typical crossover frequencies for subwoofers are 60Hz, 80Hz and 100Hz. For a ported enclosure, lower is probably better.

The phase shift should be set to the position that best synchronizes the bass with the music. Because of the additional wiring required for the subs, the signal to them is sometimes slightly delayed causing the bass to be "out-of-sync" with the rest of the music. The thump of the bass comes just a little sooner or later than expected. If the bass sounds out of phase, turn the phase shift on, otherwise leave it off.

The "gain" or level control allows you to match the amps input to your head units subwoofer output. The best setting is usually as high as possible without distortion. Set it by turning up the head unit volume to about 3/4 maximum and then advance the amp gain until your subs just begin to distort. Then back it off slightly.

These settings should allow your amp to put the most power into the frequencies that your subwoofers are designed for and hence produce the loudest and lowest bass.

Hope this helps.

Jun 28, 2009 | Legacy Car Audio & Video

2 Answers

Bass speaker moving in out more then normal

If you can't hear the difference maybe the bass frequency which is moving the speakers is below your hearing range.

I think you may have a "loudness" button on that amp -- if you do, turn off the loudness -- this is a bass booster.

But, in general, bass speakers are designed to move in & out a lot. They have to move a lot of air to produce the bass sound.

May 09, 2009 | B&W ASW1000 Speaker

3 Answers

Bass frequncy

Hi there,
Although I am not familiar with the Zoom HD 8 Track I am a former sound engineer so may be able to offer some general advice.
Firstly, because the wave pattern of low frequencies is very long, there are a number of things that will greatly effect bass response caused by standing waves.
1) The position of your bass monitors. Ideally these should be low down but not directly on the floor, especially if the flooring is wooden.
2) Try your monitors/speakers at a slightly different angle. Bass can bounce off walls, back towards the sound source and phase out the signal, rather like a noise cancelling system.
3) Try listening to the sound in different areas of the room. You will be amazed at how the sound pressure level will vary, simply by you moving from one position to another.
4) Never put bass tracks exactly at centre, always offset them slighly by a few degrees left or right.
5) Do some of your mixing using headphones, you will not have to worry about standing waves. But remember that things sound very different on speakers in free space.
Strangely, the reason you are getting distortion when you turn things up is probably because your bass is on the verge of over modulation to start with. Really bass is felt, not heard. You could try is to decrease your mid and high frequencies a little. The ratio between high frequencies and low ones will then increase by default and your bass may feel heavier.
What are you mixing?

Dec 31, 2007 | Koss EQ50 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

Dual voice coil speakers

best way to do this to preserve your amp and speaker is to wire the speaker Voice coils in series.

VC1 = Voice coil 1

AMP + to VC1 +
VC1 - to VC2 +
VC2 - to Amp -

Set you amps bass gain down very low. Crank up the volume with a bass test audio track. Turn the switch to LPF or Low pass filter. Adjust a LPF to about 60 hz Adjust the bass gain up until your Sub begins to sound sitorted or choppy. Then tune the bass gain just below where it distorts. Then you are set.

Dec 07, 2007 | Jl Audio 12W6v2 Car Subwoofer

1 Answer

Optimum sound performance needed

1) legacy products are highly overrated and i have never seen one put out the power it claims
2) if you are running the amp bridged, you need to match the impedance of the speakers to the amps highest output impedance, otherwise your system will not sound all that great...

what size fuse or fuses does your amp use? what size wire did you install with (power and ground)? did you connect direct to battery or did you connect to a fuse block or similar? did you use a stiffening capacitor? does it sound like it is clipping when you turn it up or is it just distorted? what kind of box are you using for the speakers (ported, vented, sealed, bandpass)?

if you give me the model number of your speakers and your amplifier i can probably help you more, but with the information you have provided, this is all i can offer..

hope it helps,

Nov 11, 2007 | Legacy - American II: 2 Channel 2000W...

6 Answers

Bass amp for guitar?

i say it can! u would get a nice clean sound! acoustic guitar sounds nice through a bass amp!

you probably wouldnt get distortion out of bass amp though! depends on the bass amp! some bass amps have built in effects! e.g distortion

Oct 15, 2007 | 3Com SuperStack II advanced RPS...

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