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Looking for a manual for the norco sekine ladies bike . How do I adjust the front hand brake? Its too tight. rubbing on the tire as I ride.

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: I am looking for a manual for a mongoose tech 4 mountain bike

The brakes should have a label on them so you can find their website. Most of the good manufacturers have directions on their sites for adjusting their products. The bike I looked at had V brakes. http://www.sheldonbrown.com/canti-direct.html is the site to look at. Great pictures and good explanations.

Posted on Jun 25, 2009

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SOURCE: adjust rear hand brake on Mongoose 20 inch bicycle

Here is the perfect site for you:http://www.bikeguide.org/how-to/brakes/brakes.php They're called gyro brakes by the way.

Posted on Aug 28, 2009

  • 302 Answers

SOURCE: Schwinn Bike Brake Adjustment

loosen the cable clamp screw, position the brake where you want it and then re-tighten the cable clamp screw

Posted on Sep 10, 2009

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SOURCE: The front disc brake of my childs bike is rubbing

There are good articles with pictures at this website:http://www.parktool.com/repair/byregion.asp?catid=14 Please rate this if it helps.

Posted on Nov 05, 2009

  • 384 Answers

SOURCE: How do you adjust the hand brake? I can get them

the bolt that runs through the frame might needto be tigthen more that the part that holds the brake in place

Posted on Feb 22, 2010

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I have a 2007 Harley Super Glide, my front breaks are constantly rubbing on the rotor, could they be on to tight??


Noise in front wheel area Harley Davidson Forums
1) Does the noise stop, change, dissipate when you apply the brakes?

2) Does the noise increase with tire revolution and/or engine RPMs? If so, which one? Tire or engine RPMs?

3) Does the sound change during cornering?

Can't hear it at speed? Be careful and disengage the clutch at 'speed' to listen for it.

If I were a betting man (I'm not) I'd say it's either a rotor or a brake pad. The rotor could be warped, the brake pad could be improperly installed. Or it could be that what you're hearing is the drilled rotors that you're not used to. I assume you have drilled rotors. Not familiar with your bike.

Another (very) possible scenario is an out-of-round tire or a separted ply on the tire. If so, that can get dangerous. Be careful.

If possible, lift the bike and turn the front wheel by hand. See if you can pin down the noise. If you can't, steady your hand on something and hold the end of screw driver (or anything that's straight) about a 1/4" from the tire tread and see if it's out of round while someone else turns the tire. This can also show a separated ply. Usually.

As always, be careful.

Apr 12, 2015 | Super Motorcycles

3 Answers

Brakes for bikes?


What about them? Are you looking for recommendations? For what bike type? Road bike bike? Please be more specific.

Feb 12, 2015 | Cycling

1 Answer

No break lights and no signal lights and dash lights


  1. Standard Maintenance Schedule
    • The oil and filter should be changed at the first 1,000 miles, then 5,000 miles, then every 5,000 miles thereafter. The transmission lubricant should also be changed with the first 1,000 miles, then every 10,000 miles, along with the spark plugs. The following should also be tended to:
      * At 10,000 miles, the steering head bearings need lubricating.
      * At 20,000 miles, lubricate the steering head bearings again and adjust them if necessary. Also, change the front fork oil.
      * At 25,000 miles, lubricate the master cylinder pistons, the front brake lever pin and the brake caliper pins. Replace the brake caliper boots, bushings and the rubber components in the master cylinders and calipers.
      * At 30,000 miles, replace the rear fork bearings.
    Maintenance for Winter Storage
    • Putting your bike away for the winter entails more than parking it in the garage. You want to store it in prime condition so that it runs properly when you restart it. Storing your machine for the winter entails:
      * Changing the oil and filter.
      * Adding fuel stabilizer and running the bike so the fluid flow through the fuel system.
      * Remove the battery and plug it into a battery tender that will keep it charged through the winter or run your bike for a few minutes every few weeks to keep the battery charged.
      * Properly inflate the tires and move the bike occasionally to even out the tire pressure.
      * Clean the bike, polish your chrome and aluminum surfaces, wash the windshield and treat the leather surfaces with a protector.
      * Store it indoors, or cover the Harley with a motorcycle cover, to protect it from the elements.
    Pre-Ride Check List
    • Inspecting your Harley whenever you ride is a good idea, but it should always be done before you go on a long trip. A pre-ride review should consist of the following check points:
      * Your fluids.
      * Your controls, such as the brakes, throttle and steering.
      * Your tire pressure.
      * Your breaks.
      * Your lights, like your signals, headlights and tail lights.
      * Your mirrors, to make sure they are properly adjusted.
      * Your battery.
      * Inspect for leaks related to oil, fuel and hydraulics.
      * Examine the drive belt and sprockets.
    Tires
    • Make sure the tires are inflated so they wear properly and the bike handles normally. Check that both tires have their valve stems and they are in good condition. Test that your wheel spokes are tight by lightly running a screwdriver tip over them. A loose spoke sounds different than those with the correct tension.
    Battery
    • A battery's terminals and connectors should be kept clean. Test that the clamps and cables are tight since loose connections are usually the culprit when it comes to sudden battery failure. Keep the vent tube clear of any kinks and/or blockages.
    Brakes
    • The rotors to your brakes need to have a smooth surface that's free of debris. Examine where the brake pads come in contact with the rotors to see if there's any discoloration. Check your manual to verify the proper thickness of your brake pads.
    Lights
    • It's a good idea to have a friend look at your lights--front, back, brake and blinkers--while you flip the switches. You can use a wall or window for a reflection if you are testing them alone.

Jan 14, 2013 | 2004 Harley Davidson FLSTF - FLSTFI Fat...

1 Answer

Hi. New ( 1 mnth road driven ) norco mountaineer 7005. Back disc brake rubbing a bit. Need clear instructions to fix. Please guide me norco gods. Tim


Nothing on a bike is unique to the manufacturer of the bike. All components are generic and made by a handful of makers. Go to the website of the brake manufacturer and look around. Or web search "how to...." just about anything you want to know.

Try here for procedures and tools.

http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help

Aug 13, 2011 | Norco Mountaineer

1 Answer

Back hand brake rubs on pads cannot adjust basic hand brakes


If you can't adjust your brake position by using the adjustment screws you can loosen the wheel bolts and physically change the tires position to make it fit within the brakes. If that doesn't work take you bicycle into your local bike shop and have them check your rim alignment.

May 06, 2011 | Cycling

1 Answer

Front brake pads are not resting on the rim


Getting hand-brakes adjusted correctly is often a challenge, but they are adjustable with the right size wrenches. On the other hand, a front hand-brake on a child's one-speed bike is not necessary and is only on the bike to give it sales-appeal. If this is a one-speed bike, then it has a coaster brake (operated by pushing the pedals backwards). Actually the coaster brake is much safer than a front hand brake anyway. If the child applies the coaster brake too heavily, they will just skid. If they apply the front brake too heavily, they will go over the handlebars. If the hand brake is not interfering with the front wheel and is just not very effective, I would just leave it as-is. If the brakes rub on the tire, you should adjust them so they don't rub the tire.

Jul 23, 2010 | Dynacraft 16" Boy's Wheels Bike

1 Answer

The bike makes a loud, rubbing noise. Any ideas?


The most common problem that causes a loud rubbing sound is a tire, usually the back tire, rubbing on the frame, and you can usually see exactly where it is rubbing. Brakes can rub too, but they usually are not that loud, so let's assume it is the tire. This happens when the rear axle wasn't tight enough, and when you pedal hard or hit a pothole, it can make the axle pivot in the slots it fits in, and this lets the tire to rub on the frame, usually on the front part of the rear tire.
Solution: For this kind of work, I usually flip the bike upside down on an old piece of carpet, etc. so it is sitting on the seat and handlebars with the front wheel pointing straight ahead. There are two common methods to secure the axle:
1. Two pretty good sized nuts, one on each side. Find a wrench that fits just right. I prefer a socket, box end or open end wrench, one for each side. On metric nuts, it will often be 14mm or 15mm, sometimes bigger. American sizes are usually in the 9/16 - 5/8 - 11/16" range. I strongly discourage you from using any kind of pliers or even an adjustable (crescent) wrench. You have to tighten these babies pretty tight, and you can easily burr the corners off your nuts with adjustable tools, believe me I've done it. The tricky part is you have to do three things at once. First, you have to keep the front part of the tire evenly spaced between the two sides of the frame. Next, you have to slide both sides of the axle back in their slots until the chain has the proper tension. If you have a ten-speed style bike, the derailler mechanism will adjust the tension automatically for you, so slide the axle all the way back until the side with the gears is against the back of its slot, and let the other side move forward or back as needed for the tire to be centered between the frame. Finally, while you are keeping things lined up - a patient friend who is willing to help makes this much easier, just have them hold the tire so it is evenly spaced between the frame, and then you have to tighten the nuts. If you don't have a ten-speed style gear changer on the back tire, you have to take up most of the slack in the chain yourself and hold it tight until you get those nuts tight enough to keep the axle from slipping. Don't be surprised if you have to loosen up the nuts and do it again - on a single speed bike you should have about 1/4" to 1/2" of flex in the middle of the chain, halfway between the front and rear sprockets. Too tight, and it can wear out your bearings or chain well before their time. Too loose, and your chain will fall off at the worst possible moment, and you will have to do this process all over again, after you push your bike back home. Tighten a little on each side until things get snug, and if the tire is still centered between the frame, do both sides again, harder now (grunt a little this time, it helps) and you should be good to go. Remember, you are not trying to strip the axle threads, or break anything, but you do have to get it tight enough so it won't slip on you again.
2. Oh, yeah, there is another common method you find pretty often on ten-speed style bikes, the quick release.
91177b4.jpg This is an assembly that consists of a lever built onto the axle nut, and the lever is only on one side. You don't use a wrench on the quick release, but they are a little tricky until you understand how they work. As you pull the lever away from the frame, a cam inside loosens the axle, and as you push the lever toward the frame, it tightens. When the lever is in the loose position, you can also spin the nut on the axle tighter or looser (careful, it doesn't take much, and clockwise should be tighter on most bikes). Tightening or loosening the nut part does most of travel, and the lever does the last little bit. The lever is short, usually only 2-3 inches, so if you don't have to push pretty hard on the lever, the nut is probably too loose, and you need to loosen the lever and rotate the nut part clockwise a little bit, until it feels like the axle is getting really good and tight just about the time the lever gets close to the frame. This can also take 2-3 tries of loosening the lever, tightening or loosening the nut, and retightening the lever again, until it feels good and tight, and of course, you have to check your tire alignment one more time to make sure it is still nicely centered between the frame of the bike. Turn the wheel by hand a few turns to make sure it doesn't rub on the frame. If everything is tight, and your tire is still centered, you're ready for a test ride. Just up and down the driveway to start with, and make sure your brakes are okay. Then you can go a little farther, and pedal a little harder. Hopefully the axle will be nice and solid, and you can say, "Good Job! I fixed it myself, on Fixya!"

May 09, 2010 | Cycling

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