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I have a 3x12x40 pine ride scope. How many mph of wind corresponds with the windage numbers on the right side of the scope?

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The numbers that you are asking about I take it are on the windage turret if so they correspond to inches at 100 yards not mph

Posted on Apr 14, 2015

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How do i use a tasco 28A


1. Insert the Bore Stud into the Stanchion while aligning the arrows as shows. Insert the assembled scope guide into the muzzle of your rifle with the grid pattern upright. 2. Select the Aperture Cap that fits your objective rim. Place it over the objective end of your rifle scope and press until it fits flatly against the rim. 3. Using the Adjustable Scale measure the top of your rifle scope tube to the center of the rifle bore as follows: Open the rifle breach. Rest the upper arm of the scale on the scope tube before or behind the windage and elevation turrets. The scale markings should be facing towards you reading vertically and ascending from bottom to top. Slide the lower end of the scale up or down until it is touching the center point of the bore. On center fire rifles the center point will be the firing pin. On rimfire models the center will be the shell extractor. Read the number that corresponds to the indicator marked "CF". Make a note of the reading. 4. Aim the rifle toward a light, flatly lit area such as a wall or open sky. Caution: Do Not Look At The Sun As Permanent Eye Injury Could Result. 5. While keeping the riflescope at the right distance to see the full field of view, sight through it on the grid pattern. Move the stanchion right or left until the bold centerline is parallel to the vertical reticule wire. Turn the windage dial right or left until the vertical reticule is aligned with the grid centerline. 6. Use the reading from the scale to align the horizontal reticule wire. Find the numbered horizontal grid line that corresponds to the number on the scale. Turn the elevation dial right or left until the horizontal reticule wire aligns with this corresponding grid line. 7. To make your final zeroing adjustments remove the scope guide from the bore of your rifle. WARNING: FIREING YOUR RIFLE WITHOUT REMOVING THE SCOPE GUIDE MAY CAUSE DAMAGE TO YOUR RIFLE AND OR CAUSE YOU INJURY At a range or other safe area test fire a group of three rounds of the same type ammunition at a target at least 50 yards away. Refine your scope alignment by adjusting the windage and elevation dials. Move to your desired distance from the target and test fire another group and make your final windage and elevation adjustments. 8. Restore the stud tension by pressing the end of the spring.

Feb 13, 2011 | Tasco Scope Guide Quickly Zeroing Rifle...

1 Answer

Dont understand why on top of an side of scope setting there is ur ur instead of left right or up down


The "U" indicates Up on the elevation dial, and the "R" indicates Right on the windage dial. Turn the elevation dial clockwise to move the point of impact up, counterclockwise moves down. Similarly, turning the windage dial clockwise moves Right, and counterclockwise moves left. Here's a scan from the Zeiss Conquest manual:
Good luck!

thomascha103_5.jpg

Jan 05, 2011 | Zeiss CONQUEST 3-9X40 MATTE Z PLEX

1 Answer

When bore sighting my rifle the windage is maxed out to the left onthe scope and it needs to go more to the left to hit zero. What is my problem.


this is a scope mount fault,,its not brilled out right,,,,you could try packing some 35mm film at the side of the scope on the eye end to push the scope across to get more windage
pack the left side!

Sep 22, 2010 | Nikon Optics

2 Answers

Cannot get to the bull's eye. rifle shoots 2" to right of bull's eye. after two full turns left on windage - nothing happened. I',m ready to return to the store. Any help???


continue to adjust the wind-age. If your problem persists I would suggest turning both to a random point and re-start sighting the gun. If that does not fix the problem return the sight because this most likely means the wind-age is disconnected.

Aug 17, 2010 | Bushnell .22 Rimfire 3-9x32 Rifle Scope...

1 Answer

Windage fully clockwise "In" and not quite there at 100 yds.


remount the scope using millett angle lock rings that allow you to adjust for windage. bring the scope as close to hitting bulls eye as possible then use the scopes adjustments for the fine tuning. before remounting you will want to recenter the reticule.

Mar 14, 2010 | Bushnell ® Elite® 3200 3 - 9x40 mm...

2 Answers

CAN NOT ZERO GUN


You may try to bore sight it first. Pull the bolt and setting the gun on a good rest sight thru the barrel at a dot on the wall within ten feet. Then adjust the scope to that dot. As you adjust the scope tap the bore of the scope with a screw driver handle, tap it after each adjustment not hard, but enough to give it a sharp jolt. Once you are close here, move out to the range and shoot at 15 yards. Using a rest, again tap the scope after each adjustment. Then move out to 50 yards and you will want to be shooting high 1.5 to 2 inches here. Shoot slow keep the barrel cool and try for 2 shot groups till you have got the scope dialed in. Then move out to 100 yards for your preference of zero. Remember use the same ammo you will hunt with or at least the same bullet weight. If you can't get her to get on paper you can try to loosen the scope in the rings, one at the time once the gun is a little warm. Loosen the barrel ring first then snug it back down and then the receiver ring. If your group moved now, she was in a bind due to a cold gun at set up / installation.

Dec 01, 2009 | Optics

1 Answer

I just bought a rifle with one on it. exactly how


the adjustment on the front eye PC is your zoom.
for your wind edge you have a series of numbers.
some scopes differ some read 5,10,15,etc
some read 1,2,3,4 etc, the # are estimated wind speed,left or right.if the wind isn't blowing set it on 0.
for your elevation you will have a series of #'s
50,75,100,etc.this is your yard edge sight it in at 75 yrd's and if what your shooting at is 100 yards just turn the knob to the correct setting.good luck

Oct 30, 2009 | Bausch and Lomb Bausch & Lomb Hunting...

1 Answer

How do you zero a simmons atec 512101, I dont have a manual, or any instructions... My first scope


Hi :)

In order to familiarize yourself with shooting please go here

I stumbled across this software a month ago as an avid shooter enthusiast. I havent had the chance to fire more than 100 rounds before i touched this and most were iron sights. now i have the math to shoot any bullet in any condition upto 2000 yards :) practically military level training but not quite.

Take the training that is provided and go through it a couple of times there are a few key things to remember

when you first start go to the training range **this range is standard humidity, temperature, elevation, and barometric pressure. This means that all you have to account for is range and wind this is where to start.

1)range the target. see below for details. best to work in yards as sierra is yards too.
IMPORTANT remember if you scope in to 20x to divide your mil dot reading by 2 before your divide the inches x 27.778 or inches x 25.4? this wil give you accurate range (lol get a laser range finder for RL :)

2) Elevation - if your range is 1530yards between 35.6 moa @ 1500 and 36.2 moa @ 1550. use a calculator to determine where your range lies (sierra can be asked when producing a range card to have a set increment if set to the exact range then exact values are given :)

so 36.2 - 35.6 = 0.6 30/50 = 60% to get this divide the range in yards inbetween the increments by the increment value IE in a 100 yard increment it would differ

once you have your elevation dial it in. rounding to the closest 1/4 min of angle.

3) Windage - Windage is a little different in the windage collumn its given in inches of drift per 1 mph wind (if your having trouble with wind take the shot first hit the target read in the bottom wind speed and then calculate that windspeed and get the math first)(use this for range to infact before you delve to far into ranging ( makes for faster learning and can be written of a laser range finder and wind speed measurement accessory which 99% of shooters use now adays unless your some vet or 10000 round pro :S not thier yet)

so take your inches of drift lets jsut say i used the same method to determine the exact inches of drift between the two given (most ranges arent exactly on) and my inches per mph is 3.2 w a 10 mp wind

this is 3.2 x 10 = 32 inches of wind drift total. to conver that to rifle clicks you might remember that 1 MOA is = 1.047 inches @ 100 yards or 1.512.. @ 100 meters that means for every 1 moa you adjust your windage your bullet will travel 1.047 inches for every hundread yards the target is away

FIRST take range 1530 yards and divide by 100 yards to get 15.3 x 1.047 = MOA of windage ON THIS SHOT which happens to be 16.0191 that means for every 1 moa i adjust into the wind it will move 16.0191" per 1 moa i adjust.

Since we know that the wind will blow it 32 inches off target you divide 32 by your Inches per moa 16.0191 to get your MOA windage adjustment of 1.9976... which is rounded to the closest click of your scope (probably 1/4 min maybe 1 min you need to check how many click between the big lines on the gun.

Once you know all this stuff zeroing becomes a matter of how high you gun is over at a certain know distance. :) Sierra has that too :S





SOME THINGS TO REMEMBER




1) Targets height in inches x 27.778 / Mil Dot Reading = Range in Yards

This is where you need to start when taking a shot. The range is the most important factor as it is what the rest of the measurements are based off of. TIP invest in some evironmental accessories something that measure wind speed and direction and barrel, Temperature, Humidity, and get Barometric Pressure.

2) Your "cheat sheet" or "range card" needs to be set up accurately, there is alot of software out there that can do this for you with accurate measurements of your environment (once you get past the math of the shooting it becomes your ability to measure your evironment that makes the shots).

I use Sierra Infinity v6 Ballistics Software :) Found here

its incredibly complicated math that i havent been able to unearth without taking a 600 dollar sniper course, to determine your own range cards in varying environments (humidity and temperature vary from day to day and wil throw your bullets off over 1000 yards)

use this software before you go to the range or as you set up to print yourself the daily range card
then just use the range card and your calcualtor to hit any target you want. youll be able if you bring your laptop or they are shooting a similar load to advise others on how to zero it in :)

3) Your going to need to get some specifics of your firearm and load. the bullet is the most finickey of variables ranging greatly from grain to grain in the same caliber. These data are your bullets Feet per second(this helps determine bullet flight time which decides on bullet drop) and Ballistics Coefficient (a measure of how well the bullets retains its origional velocity against air resistance)(to not slow down)

GL and if you need help converting everthing to meters for the hell of it ive got the numbers :S

Brad

If this thrad was helpful please rate it as such

Apr 09, 2009 | Optics

1 Answer

I need a scope guide instruction sheet for the Tasco 28a


1. Insert the Bore Stud into the Stanchion while aligning the arrows as shows. Insert the assembled scope guide into the muzzle of your rifle with the grid pattern upright.

2. Select the Aperture Cap that fits your objective rim. Place it over the objective end of your rifle scope and press until it fits flatly against the rim.

3. Using the Adjustable Scale measure the top of your rifle scope tube to the center of the rifle bore as follows: Open the rifle breach. Rest the upper arm of the scale on the scope tube before or behind the windage and elevation turrets. The scale markings should be facing towards you reading vertically and ascending from bottom to top. Slide the lower end of the scale up or down until it is touching the center point of the bore. On center fire rifles the center point will be the firing pin. On rimfire models the center will be the shell extractor. Read the number that corresponds to the indicator marked "CF". Make a note of the reading.

4. Aim the rifle toward a light, flatly lit area such as a wall or open sky. Caution: Do Not Look At The Sun As Permanent Eye Injury Could Result.

5. While keeping the riflescope at the right distance to see the full field of view, sight through it on the grid pattern. Move the stanchion right or left until the bold centerline is parallel to the vertical reticule wire. Turn the windage dial right or left until the vertical reticule is aligned with the grid centerline.

6. Use the reading from the scale to align the horizontal reticule wire. Find the numbered horizontal grid line that corresponds to the number on the scale. Turn the elevation dial right or left until the horizontal reticule wire aligns with this corresponding grid line.

7. To make your final zeroing adjustments remove the scope guide from the bore of your rifle.

WARNING: FIREING YOUR RIFLE WITHOUT REMOVING THE SCOPE GUIDE MAY CAUSE DAMAGE TO YOUR RIFLE AND OR CAUSE YOU INJURY

At a range or other safe area test fire a group of three rounds of the same type ammunition at a target at least 50 yards away. Refine your scope alignment by adjusting the windage and elevation dials. Move to your desired distance from the target and test fire another group and make your final windage and elevation adjustments.

8. Restore the stud tension by pressing the end of the spring.

Dec 14, 2008 | Tasco Scope Guide Quickly Zeroing Rifle...

2 Answers

Lost manual for trophy scope 3-9x40 rifle


There is no manual for elevation and windage adjustments. (at least not one that comes with your scope; all your scopes manual will say is whether its FFP or SFP (First Focal Plane or Second Focal Plane, the scale used on your scope for mil dots)(you can get this info by finding a store that sells this scope and asking a sales rep)

To adjust for elevation and windage you have to take into account the daily factors (unless your shooting in the same indoor environmental controlled shooting range each day you SNOB! jk

The formula takes alot of variables into account and is known as Exterior Ballistics

!) Environmental Factors - First thing you account for.

A) Elevation from sea level plays a large part into your environmental adjustments. Your elevation from sea level determines largely the Barometirc Pressure but it also varies slightly with Temp and Humidity (Major Factor)

B) Temperature - The temperature can affect the density of the air. The hotter it is the thinner it is and therefore less resistance and a higher bullet trajectory (Minor Factor)

C) Humidity - This again will affect the densify of the air infront of your bullet (Minor Factor)

D) Barometric Pressure - The other large factor in air density this is the base stat that the others modify

These all combined create a ratio that you apply to standard MOA (windage and elevation adjustments) to obtain the shooting information for that particular environment)



2) Bullet Factors (Listed on the Box you buy) - There are a few bullet factors to take into account.

A) Speed - the bullets feet per second can vary as much or more than 500 feet per second with the
same caliber ammunition.
B) Grain - The Grain of an ammunition is a measure fo its "Sectional Density" or weight to volume
ratio
C) Ballistic Co Efficient - This number is the measure of the bullets ability to maintain its speed
during flight. This also varies from Grain to Grain


These factors are complex and a pain for the best of shooters to determine. adding to that confusion. there are many ways to determine a bullets ballistics coefficient and each one gets a different number. In this case bullet data is best retieved from the manufactuerers box and take their word for it.

3) Lastly you account for shot factors.

A) Range - by referencing your standard elevation MOA adjustments and mutliplying by the ratio for environment the Elevation MOA is achieved.


B) Windage - Windage is done in inches per mile per hour then is multiplied by the Mph of the wind.
In order to be precise the windage is done in inches instead of MOA. it needs to be converted heres and example.

You Ballistics Cheat Sheet for the day says the windage at 900 yards is 5.2 Inches per mph of wind.
you apply the ratio for your environment .90 (all example numbers. this number would represent a shooting environment with an air density lower than standard/ the cheat sheet's known MOA adjustments). the 5.2 inches is multiplied by .9to acheive 4.68?? idk the point is you mulitply that by the wind of 10 mph to achieve a total of 46.8" of wind drift to the target.

now for the conversion to MOA. 1 MOA is eqaul to 1.047" per 100 yards. meaning for every 1 moa you adjust the bullet will move 1.047" per 100 yards (our target is 900 yards; meaning that each MOA for this target is 9*1.047" = 9.423" per MOA adjustment. so take that number and divide our total wind drift by it. ie 46.8 / 9.423 = MOA Windage Change of 4.9665... now you need to know whethere your scope is 1/4 minute clicks or 1/8 minutes (how many spaces between large numbers?) you would adjust to 5 MOA for a 1/4 minutes scope equaling 20 clicks on an 1/8th minute scope it would be 40 clicks.

This is the math of shooting. to learn how go to
WWW.shooterready.com they are an excellent sight to get the math down WITHOUT wasting ammo. Once you have the math you an transfer it to your gun. waste a few rounds checking it out and youll be hitting targets @ 1800 yards in no time

I like to take the simple way after i learned how to do the hard way

There is software tha will do the exterior calcualtions for you.

if your interested i use Sierra Infinity V6 Ballistics Software

GL


Dec 08, 2008 | Bushnell Trophy 3-9x40 Rifle Scope, Matte...

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