Question about Electrical Supplies

2 Answers

There is no output voltage even when the generator engine is turned on?

The voltmeter output is 0

Posted by on

Ad

2 Answers

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Master
  • 1,169 Answers

If this is a portable generator it may have lost it field residual magnetization. If so the field will need re-flashing.

Posted on Apr 04, 2015

Ad
  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 20 times.

  • Expert
  • 156 Answers

Have you reset the circuit breakers?

Posted on Apr 03, 2015

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

What is causing the battery to drain?


Running the car will drain the battery it if it's not charging ! An if your charging light is on it isn't charging ! Did you check power an grounds on the alternator ? There is a single heavier wire on the back of the alternator, this should have battery voltage ! You may want to take this to a ASE certified repair shop !
Functionality
With the ignition switch in the RUN position, voltage is applied through the warning indicator I circuit 904 (LG/RD) to the voltage regulator. This turns the regulator on, allowing current to flow from battery sense A circuit 35 (OG/LB) to the generator field coil. When the engine is started, the generator begins to generate alternating current (AC) which is internally converted to direct current (DC). This current is then supplied to the vehicle's electrical system through the output (B+) terminal of the generator.
Once the generator begins generating current, a voltage signal is taken from the generator stator and fed back to the regulator S circuit 4 (WH/BK). This voltage feedback signal (typically half the battery voltage) is used to turn off the warning indicator.
With the system functioning normally, the generator output current is determined by the voltage of the A circuit 35 (OG/LB). The A circuit 35 (OG/LB) voltage is compared to a set voltage internal to the regulator, and the regulator controls the generator field current to maintain the correct generator output.
The set voltage will vary with temperature and is typically higher in cold temperatures and lower in warm temperatures. This allows for better battery recharge in the winter and reduces the chance of overcharging in the summer.
Battery Positive Output (B+) Circuit 38 (BK/OG)
The generator output is supplied through the battery positive output (B+) terminal on the back of the generator to the battery and electrical system.
I Circuit 904 (LG/RD)
The I (ignition) circuit 904 (LG/RD) is used to turn on the voltage regulator. This circuit is powered up with the ignition switch in the RUN position. This circuit is also used to turn the charging system warning indicator on if there is a fault in the charging system operation.
A Circuit 35 (OG/LB)
The A (battery sense) circuit 35 (OG/LB) is used to sense battery voltage. This voltage is used by the regulator to determine generator output. This circuit is used to supply current to the generator field (rotor). The amount of current supplied to the rotor will determine generator output.
S Circuit 4 (WH/BK)
The S (stator) circuit 4 (WH/BK) is used to feed back a voltage signal from the generator to the regulator. This voltage is used by the regulator to turn off the charging system warning indicator. The S circuit is fed back externally on external mounted regulator generators.
Visual Inspection Chart Mechanical Electrical
  • Battery case, posts, hold-down clamp, cables and connections
  • Generator drive (serpentine) belt for condition and tension to make sure there is no slip between the belt and the pulley. For additional information, refer to Section 303-05 .
  • Battery charge
  • Generator pulley
  • Battery junction box (BJB)Mega Fuse
  • Battery junction box fuse:
    • 11 (20A)
  • Central junction box (CJB) fuse:
    • 30 (30A)
  • Circuitry
  • Charging system warning indicator
  • Cables
  1. Check the operation of the charging system warning indicator lamp (instrument cluster). Normal operation is as follows:
    • With the ignition switch OFF, the charging system warning indicator should be OFF.
    • With the ignition switch in RUN and the engine off, the charging system warning indicator light should be on.
    • With the engine running, the charging system warning indicator light should be off.
  1. Verify the battery condition. Refer to Section 414-01 .
Normal Charging System Voltages and Charging System Warning Indicator Operation Ignition Switch Position A Circuit 35 (OG/LB) S Circuit 4 (WH/BK) I Circuit 904 (LG/RD) Generator B+ Circuit 38 (BK/OG) Battery Engine to Battery Ground Charging System Warning Indicator Operation OFF 12 volts 0 volts 0 volts 12 volts 12 volts 0 volts Off RUN-engine off 12 volts 0 volts 1-3 volts 12 volts 12 volts 0 volts Illuminated RUN-engine running 13-
15 volts 1/2 battery voltage 13-
15 volts 13-
15 volts 13-
15 volts 0 volts Off
  1. If the customer concern is verified after the initial inspection, refer to the Symptom Chart to determine which tests to carry out.
    • The charging system warning indicator is on with the engine running (the system voltage does not increase)
    • Circuitry.
    • Voltage regulator.
    • Generator.
    • GO to Pinpoint Test B .
    Your whole problem is the alternator is not charging , a couple tests with a volt meter would tell you !

Aug 16, 2015 | 2001 Ford Expedition

1 Answer

Check engine code 1391


DTC P1391 - Intermittent loss of Camshaft Position Sensor (CMP) or Crankshaft Position Sensor (CKP)

So the problem is with the CMP or CKP or the wiring in the circuit. The Camshaft Position Sensor is located in the distributor on all engines.

zjlimited_823.gif

For this test, an analog (non-digital) voltmeter is needed. Do not remove the distributor connector from the distributor. Using small paper clips, insert them into the backside of the distributor wire harness connector to make contact with the terminals. Be sure that the connector is not damaged when inserting the paper clips. Attach voltmeter leads to these paper clips.

Connect the positive (+) voltmeter lead into the sensor output wire. This is at done the distributor wire harness connector.
Connect the negative (-) voltmeter lead into the ground wire.
Set the voltmeter to the 15 Volt DC scale.
Remove distributor cap from distributor (two screws). Rotate (crank) the engine until the distributor rotor is approximately in the 11 o'clock position. The movable pulse ring should now be within the sensor pickup.
Turn ignition key to ON position. Voltmeter should read approximately 5.0 volts.
If voltage is not present, check the voltmeter leads for a good connection.
If voltage is still not present, check for voltage at the supply wire.
If 5 volts is not present at supply wire, check for voltage at PCM 32-way connector (cavity A-17). Leave the PCM connector connected for this test.
If voltage is still not present, perform vehicle test using the DRB scan tool.
If voltage is present at cavity A-17, but not at the supply wire:
Check continuity between the supply wire. This is checked between the distributor connector and cavity A-17 at the PCM. If continuity is not present, repair the harness as necessary.
Check for continuity between the camshaft position sensor output wire and cavity A-18 at the PCM. If continuity is not present, repair the harness as necessary.
Check for continuity between the ground circuit wire at the distributor connector and ground. If continuity is not present, repair the harness as necessary.


While observing the voltmeter, crank the engine with ignition switch. The voltmeter needle should fluctuate between 0 and 5 volts while the engine is cranking. This verifies that the camshaft position sensor in the distributor is operating properly and a sync pulse signal is being generated. If sync pulse signal is not present, replacement of the camshaft position sensor is necessary.

Since you replaced the CKP, we can assume it is good for the time being. But I would inspect the flywheel for damage. A damaged flywheel will make a good CKP send a bad signal.

zjlimited_824.gif


Hope this helps and just keep in mind that your feedback is important and I'll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa.

Nov 02, 2011 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Check charging system light and check battery light come on at begining of low idle. voltage at battery terminals during high idle was 14.5 vdc, and at low idle 12.65 vdc. engine speed did not seem to...


Your generator is pcm controlled. So is the charge indicator. Any charging system trouble codes? The gencom circuit is signal from pcm to generator. The genmon signal is from generator to pcm. Even at idle if you turn on a load, there should be a reaction, engine speed may increase as well as generator output. By load,I'm talking about headlamps or hvac something. At the moment I can't rule out your generator? I hate to see you replace anything and it not fix it?
generator-hg412ca4lxlwbtke2o1ejupl-1-0.jpg

Jul 01, 2017 | 2005 Ford Taurus

2 Answers

Motor runs but doesn't deliver electricity


Make sure that the alternator is being turned by the engine--sometimes the mechanical coupling fails. Check for a tripped breaker/blown fuse. Beyond checking for bad brushes (if used), you will need a wiring diagram and an AC/DC voltmeter/ohmmeter to chase out any troubles in the alternator. Be aware of voltages up to 230 volts can be found inside even if there is no output.

Dec 03, 2009 | Coleman Powermate Powermate 5000W...

1 Answer

Motor turns over but no spark changed coil and crank shaft sensor


well replace lots of coils but same with crank sensor on these trucks
  • For this test, an analog (non-digital) voltmeter is needed. Do not remove the distributor connector from the distributor. To perform a complete test of the Camshaft Position Sensor and its circuitry, refer to the DRB II diagnostic tester. Also see the appropriate Diagnostic Charts. To test the sensor only, refer to the following: See: Testing and Inspection
  • Using small paper clips, insert them into the backside of the distributor wire harness connector to make contact with the terminals. Be sure that the connector is not damaged when inserting the paper clips. Attach voltmeter leads to these paper clips.
PROCEDURE
  1. Connect the positive (+) voltmeter lead into the sensor output wire. This is done at the distributor wire harness connector.
  2. Connect the negative (-) voltmeter lead into the ground wire.
  3. Set the voltmeter to the 15 Volt DC scale.
  4. Remove distributor cap from distributor (two screws). Rotate (crank) the engine until the distributor rotor is pointed towards the rear of vehicle. The movable pulse ring should now be within the sensor pickup.
  5. Turn ignition key to ON position. Voltmeter should read approximately 5.0 volts .
  6. If voltage is not present, check the voltmeter leads for a good connection.
  7. If voltage is still not present, check for voltage at the supply wire.
  8. If voltage is not present at supply wire, check for voltage at pin-7 of Powertrain Control Module (PCM) 60-way connector. Leave the PCM connector connected for this test.
  9. If voltage is still not present, perform vehicle test using the DRB II diagnostic scan tool.
  10. If voltage is present at pin-7, but not at the supply wire:
    1. Check continuity between the supply wire. This is checked between the distributor connector and pin-7 at the PCM. If continuity is not present, repair the harness as necessary.
    2. Check for continuity between the Camshaft Position Sensor output wire and pin-44 at the PCM. If continuity is not present, repair the harness as necessary.
    3. Check for continuity between the ground circuit wire at the distributor connector and ground. If continuity is not present, repair the harness as necessary.
  1. While observing the voltmeter, crank the engine with ignition switch. The voltmeter needle should fluctuate between 0 and 5 volts while the engine is cranking. This verifies that the camshaft position sensor in the distributor is operating properly and a sync pulse signal is being generated. NOTE: If sync pulse signal is not present, replacement of the Camshaft Position Sensor is necessary.



blnk_spc.gif Terms of Use

Oct 05, 2009 | 1995 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

No electricity from generator


If you have a voltmeter, you can check the voltage coming out of the outlet. If you have some kind of residual voltage, such as 25 Volts AC or 10 volts ac, then you probably have a voltage regulator problem and your regulator will need to be replaced. If you read 0 volts then you you have an open between the output (outlet) and the windings of the stator.

Jun 09, 2009 | Porter Cable Electrical Supplies

1 Answer

Honda EMS 4500 Generator - High Voltage Problem


As far as I can tell on the wiring diagram for this generator there is no voltage regulator unless it's incorporated with the auto throttle unit.
To lower the voltage you need to lower the speed of the generator engine. To do this there should be a screw on top of the engine under the tank when your facing the recoil. This screw presses on a arm that controls your governor. Turning it in (righty tighty) will increase rpms, turning it out will lower them. You should see the voltage change on the voltmeter.

Mar 31, 2009 | Coleman Powermate Premium Plus 6250W...

1 Answer

DTC's


DTC P1391 is "Intermittent loss of Camshaft Position Sensor (CMP) or Crankshaft Position Sensor (CKP)". So the problem is with the CMP or CKP or the wiring in the circuit.
The Camshaft Position Sensor is located in the distributor on all engines.
78283585.gif For this test, an analog (non-digital) voltmeter is needed. Do not remove the distributor connector from the distributor. Using small paper clips, insert them into the backside of the distributor wire harness connector to make contact with the terminals. Be sure that the connector is not damaged when inserting the paper clips. Attach voltmeter leads to these paper clips.
  1. Connect the positive (+) voltmeter lead into the sensor output wire. This is at done the distributor wire harness connector.
  2. Connect the negative (-) voltmeter lead into the ground wire.
  3. Set the voltmeter to the 15 Volt DC scale.
  4. Remove distributor cap from distributor (two screws). Rotate (crank) the engine until the distributor rotor is approximately in the 11 o'clock position. The movable pulse ring should now be within the sensor pickup.
  5. Turn ignition key to ON position. Voltmeter should read approximately 5.0 volts.
  6. If voltage is not present, check the voltmeter leads for a good connection.
  7. If voltage is still not present, check for voltage at the supply wire.
  8. If 5 volts is not present at supply wire, check for voltage at PCM 32-way connector (cavity A-17). Leave the PCM connector connected for this test.
  9. If voltage is still not present, perform vehicle test using the DRB scan tool.
  10. If voltage is present at cavity A-17, but not at the supply wire:
    1. Check continuity between the supply wire. This is checked between the distributor connector and cavity A-17 at the PCM. If continuity is not present, repair the harness as necessary.
    2. Check for continuity between the camshaft position sensor output wire and cavity A-18 at the PCM. If continuity is not present, repair the harness as necessary.
    3. Check for continuity between the ground circuit wire at the distributor connector and ground. If continuity is not present, repair the harness as necessary.

  11. While observing the voltmeter, crank the engine with ignition switch. The voltmeter needle should fluctuate between 0 and 5 volts while the engine is cranking. This verifies that the camshaft position sensor in the distributor is operating properly and a sync pulse signal is being generated. If sync pulse signal is not present, replacement of the camshaft position sensor is necessary.
Since you replaced the CKP, we can assume it is good for the time being. But I would inspect the flywheel for damage. A damaged flywheel will make a good CKP send a bad signal.
62383013.gif

Oct 25, 2008 | 2002 Jeep Liberty

1 Answer

2002 hyundai sonata headlights


GENERATOR OUTPUT LINE VOLTAGE DROP TEST

This test determines the condition of the wiring from the generator "B" terminal to the battery (+) terminal (including the fusible link). 1. Be sure to check the following before testing: a. Generator installation and wiring connections b. Generator drive belt tension c. Fusible link d. Abnormal noises from the generator while the engine is running. 2. Turn the ignition switch to the OFF position. 3. Disconnect the negative battery cable. 4. Disconnect the generator output wire from the generator "B" terminal. Connect a DC test ammeter with a range of 0-100A in series between the "B" terminal and the disconnected output wire. (Connect the (+) lead of the ammeter to the "B" terminal. Connect the (-) lead of the ammeter to the disconnected output wire.) An inductive-type ammeter which enables measurements to be taken without disconnecting the generator output wire is recommended. Using this equipment will lessen the possibility of a voltage drop caused by a loose "B" terminal connection. 5. Connect a digital-type voltmeter between the generator "B" terminal and the battery (+) terminal. (Connect the (+) lead of the voltmeter to the "B" terminal. Connect the (-) lead of the voltmeter to the battery (+) cable.) 6. Reconnect the negative battery cable. 7. Connect a tachometer or the scan tool. 8. Start the engine. 9. With the engine running at approx. 2500 rpm, turn the headlights and other lights on and off to adjust the generator load on the ammeter slightly above 30A. Limit: max. 0.3V When the generator output is high and the value displayed on the ammeter does not decrease to 30A, set the value to 40A. Read the value displayed on the voltmeter. In this case the limit becomes max. 0.4V. 10. If the value displayed on the voltmeter is still above the limit, a fault in the generator output wire may exist. Check the wiring between the generator "B" terminal and the battery (+) terminal (including fusible link). If a terminal is not sufficiently tight or if the harness has become discolored due to overheating, repair, then test again. 11. After the test, run the engine at idle. 12. Turn off all lights and turn the ignition switch to the OFF position. 13. Disconnect the tachometer or the scan tool. 14. Disconnect the negative battery cable. 15. Disconnect the ammeter and voltmeter. 16. Connect the generator output wire to the generator "B" terminal. 17. Connect the negative battery cable.

Jun 05, 2008 | Hyundai Motor 2002 Sonata

Not finding what you are looking for?
Electrical Supplies Logo

Related Topics:

77 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Electrical Supplies Experts

Steve

Level 3 Expert

3287 Answers

Gene Haynes

Level 3 Expert

5089 Answers

Brad Brown

Level 3 Expert

15633 Answers

Are you an Electrical Supply Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...