Question about Miscellaneous

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My hose disconnected from the air button, and the hose has fallen back out of sight. At the actual control I found a 4" clear hose connection to the base which activates the spa pumps when I blow into it. Suggestions on how to run a new hose thru the underground line where the previous hose is/was.....

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If you are referring to, that there is a conduit between the air button, and the control box, and the tubing is inside that, then you need to use an electricians fish tape.
Otherwise, do you need to get under the tub, somehow, unscrew the nut that secures the button to the spa's lip, and fish a new quarter inch tubing between the air button and the control box.

Posted on Apr 21, 2015

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SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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I have a Maytag Bravo Washing machine, and am having trouble with the drain cycle. I have replaced the pump twice and have checked the drain line. My washer will start and get to the drain cycle and it...


Here are some pointers to look at to determine the real problem. The code Ld indicates that the water level does not change after the drain pump is turned on.The machine/motor control detects such condition through the water level pressure sensor located in the control itself.

Since the drain pump is definitely not the problem, either the drain hose is blocked or installed too high, or the pressure sensor system is malfunctioning. Check if water is actually draining or not. If yes and the tub is actually empty when code appears, then the problem is in pressure sensor system. If no, then check for drain blockage.

Unplug the machine. Remove the three screws from the rear of the console assembly then pull console towards the front of washer to hinge it open and remove console. The machine/motor control assembly is located on the right hand side of the machine that is enclosed in a casing with a clear tube/hose connected to it.

jahn27_415.jpg
jahn27_416.jpg

The clear tube/hose is the pressure hose. Check to make sure that everything connected to the machine/motor control assembly is properly attached and fully inserted and the pressure hose has no air leak, kinks, or moisture.

Turn off the water supply to the washer and disconnect the hot and cold water hoses from the rear of the washer then remove the end of the drain hose from where it is installed. Remove the eight screws from the rear panel and remove the panel.
Inspect the pressure hose for evidence of water then replace the hose if water or moisture is present. Inspect the air dome hose connection port for lint or flashing.

Use a small round device such as a small screwdriver to ensure that there is nothing blocking the air dome outlet on the tub. Also disconnect the pressure hose from the machine/motor control and blow air forcefully down the hose and also into the pressure sensor inlet in the control.

Replace the machine/motor control assembly if and only if verified that there are no issues with the pressure sensor system. Remove all the wire connections to the machine/motor control then remove the screw holding it to the console tray. Two plastic legs on the rear of the machine/motor control assembly are fitted into the console tray. Lift the front of the control assembly to pivot it out from the console tray. Reinstall the new machine/motor control assembly then secure it to the console tray and reconnect the wire harnesses.

NOTE: It is a good idea to take note of the wire harness connections before disconnecting them to prevent messing them up upon reconnection.
Labeling the connections makes reconnection more easily and trouble-free.


Jul 15, 2011 | Maytag Washing Machines

1 Answer

Leaking air conditioner, possible crack in drainage hole??


System Inspection
Although the A/C system should not be serviced by the do-it-yourselfer, preventive maintenance can be practiced and A/C system inspections can be performed to help maintain the efficiency of the vehicle's A/C system. For A/C system inspection, perform the following: The easiest and often most important check for the air conditioning system consists of a visual inspection of the system components. Visually inspect the air conditioning system for refrigerant leaks, damaged compressor clutch, abnormal compressor drive belt tension and/or condition, plugged evaporator drain tube, blocked condenser fins, disconnected or broken wires, blown fuses, corroded connections and poor insulation.
CHECKING FOR OIL LEAKS Refrigerant leaks show up as oily areas on the various components because the compressor oil is transported around the entire system along with the refrigerant. Look for oily spots on all the hoses and lines, and especially on the hose and tubing connections. If there are oily deposits, the system may have a leak, and you should have it checked by a certified air conditioning specialist.
Fig. 1: Run your hand along the underside of all hose connections and check for leaks. If you find a leak, have it fixed by a certified air conditioning specialist.
check%20ac%20leak.jpg KEEPING THE CONDENSER CLEAR Periodically inspect the front of the condenser for bent fins or foreign material (dirt, bugs, leaves, etc.). If any cooling fins are bent, straighten them carefully. You can remove any debris with a stiff bristle brush.

Fig. 1: The position of the condenser in front of the radiator makes it particularly susceptible to collecting debris. Periodically, remove the accumulated bugs, leaves and other trash from the condenser. ac%202.gif
CHECKING THE REFRIGERANT LEVEL There are two ways to check refrigerant level. On vehicles equipped with sight glasses, checking the refrigerant level is a simple matter. Many late model vehicles, however, do not have a sight glass, and you have to check the temperature of the lines to determine the refrigerant level.
With Sight Glass The sight glass is normally located in the head of the receiver/drier. The receiver/drier is not hard to locate. It's a large metal cylinder that looks something like a fire extinguisher. Sometimes the sight glass is located in one of the metal lines leading from the top of the receiver/drier. Once you've found it, wipe it clean and proceed as follows:
  1. With the engine and the air conditioning system running, look for the flow of refrigerant through the sight glass. If the air conditioner is working properly, you'll be able to see a continuous flow of clear refrigerant through the sight glass, with perhaps an occasional bubble at very high temperatures.
  2. Cycle the air conditioner on and off to make sure what you are seeing is clear refrigerant. Since the refrigerant is clear, it is possible to mistake a completely discharged system for one that is fully charged. Turn the system off and watch the sight glass. If there is refrigerant in the system, you'll see bubbles during the off cycle. If you observe no bubbles when the system is running, and the airflow from the unit in the vehicle is delivering cold air, everything is OK.
  3. If you observe bubbles in the sight glass while the system is operating, the system is low on refrigerant. Have it checked by a professional.
  4. Oil streaks in the sight glass are an indication of trouble. Most of the time, if you see oil in the sight glass, it will appear as a series of streaks, although occasionally it may be a solid stream of oil. In either case, it means that part of the charge has been lost.
  1. Fig. 1: Oils streaks (A), constant bubbles (B) or foam (C) indicate there is not enough refrigerant in the system. Occasional bubbles during the initial operation are normal. A clear sight glass indicates a proper charge of refrigerant or no refrigerant at all, which can be determined by the presence of cold air at the outlets in the vehicle. If the glass is clouded with a milky white substance, have the receiver/dryer checked by a certified air conditioning specialist. ac%203.jpg

Without Sight Glass On vehicles that are not equipped with sight glasses, it is necessary to feel the temperature difference in the inlet and outlet lines at the receiver/drier to gauge the refrigerant level. Use the following procedure:
  1. Locate the receiver/drier. It will generally be up front near the condenser. It is shaped like a small fire extinguisher and will always have two lines connected to it. One line goes to the expansion valve and the other goes to the condenser.
  2. With the engine and the air conditioner running, hold a line in each hand and gauge their relative temperatures. If they are the same approximate temperatures, the system is correctly charged.
  3. If the line from the expansion valve to the receiver/drier is a lot colder than the line from the receiver/drier to the condenser, then the system is overcharged. It should be noted that this is an extremely rare condition.
  4. If the line that leads from the receiver/drier to the condenser is a lot colder than the other line, the system is undercharged.
  5. If the system is undercharged or overcharged, have it checked by a professional air conditioning mechanic.
Fig. 3: Checking the refrigerant charge if the system has no sight glass. ac%204.jpg

May 24, 2011 | Sharp CV10NH Air Conditioner

1 Answer

My "Alpine" air conditioner is


System Inspection
Although the A/C system should not be serviced by the do-it-yourselfer, preventive maintenance can be practiced and A/C system inspections can be performed to help maintain the efficiency of the vehicle's A/C system. For A/C system inspection, perform the following: The easiest and often most important check for the air conditioning system consists of a visual inspection of the system components. Visually inspect the air conditioning system for refrigerant leaks, damaged compressor clutch, abnormal compressor drive belt tension and/or condition, plugged evaporator drain tube, blocked condenser fins, disconnected or broken wires, blown fuses, corroded connections and poor insulation.
CHECKING FOR OIL LEAKS Refrigerant leaks show up as oily areas on the various components because the compressor oil is transported around the entire system along with the refrigerant. Look for oily spots on all the hoses and lines, and especially on the hose and tubing connections. If there are oily deposits, the system may have a leak, and you should have it checked by a certified air conditioning specialist.
Fig. 1: Run your hand along the underside of all hose connections and check for leaks. If you find a leak, have it fixed by a certified air conditioning specialist.
check%20ac%20leak.jpg KEEPING THE CONDENSER CLEAR Periodically inspect the front of the condenser for bent fins or foreign material (dirt, bugs, leaves, etc.). If any cooling fins are bent, straighten them carefully. You can remove any debris with a stiff bristle brush.

Fig. 1: The position of the condenser in front of the radiator makes it particularly susceptible to collecting debris. Periodically, remove the accumulated bugs, leaves and other trash from the condenser. ac%202.gif
CHECKING THE REFRIGERANT LEVEL There are two ways to check refrigerant level. On vehicles equipped with sight glasses, checking the refrigerant level is a simple matter. Many late model vehicles, however, do not have a sight glass, and you have to check the temperature of the lines to determine the refrigerant level.
With Sight Glass The sight glass is normally located in the head of the receiver/drier. The receiver/drier is not hard to locate. It's a large metal cylinder that looks something like a fire extinguisher. Sometimes the sight glass is located in one of the metal lines leading from the top of the receiver/drier. Once you've found it, wipe it clean and proceed as follows:
  1. With the engine and the air conditioning system running, look for the flow of refrigerant through the sight glass. If the air conditioner is working properly, you'll be able to see a continuous flow of clear refrigerant through the sight glass, with perhaps an occasional bubble at very high temperatures.
  2. Cycle the air conditioner on and off to make sure what you are seeing is clear refrigerant. Since the refrigerant is clear, it is possible to mistake a completely discharged system for one that is fully charged. Turn the system off and watch the sight glass. If there is refrigerant in the system, you'll see bubbles during the off cycle. If you observe no bubbles when the system is running, and the airflow from the unit in the vehicle is delivering cold air, everything is OK.
  3. If you observe bubbles in the sight glass while the system is operating, the system is low on refrigerant. Have it checked by a professional.
  4. Oil streaks in the sight glass are an indication of trouble. Most of the time, if you see oil in the sight glass, it will appear as a series of streaks, although occasionally it may be a solid stream of oil. In either case, it means that part of the charge has been lost.
  1. Fig. 1: Oils streaks (A), constant bubbles (B) or foam (C) indicate there is not enough refrigerant in the system. Occasional bubbles during the initial operation are normal. A clear sight glass indicates a proper charge of refrigerant or no refrigerant at all, which can be determined by the presence of cold air at the outlets in the vehicle. If the glass is clouded with a milky white substance, have the receiver/dryer checked by a certified air conditioning specialist. ac%203.jpg

Without Sight Glass On vehicles that are not equipped with sight glasses, it is necessary to feel the temperature difference in the inlet and outlet lines at the receiver/drier to gauge the refrigerant level. Use the following procedure:
  1. Locate the receiver/drier. It will generally be up front near the condenser. It is shaped like a small fire extinguisher and will always have two lines connected to it. One line goes to the expansion valve and the other goes to the condenser.
  2. With the engine and the air conditioner running, hold a line in each hand and gauge their relative temperatures. If they are the same approximate temperatures, the system is correctly charged.
  3. If the line from the expansion valve to the receiver/drier is a lot colder than the line from the receiver/drier to the condenser, then the system is overcharged. It should be noted that this is an extremely rare condition.
  4. If the line that leads from the receiver/drier to the condenser is a lot colder than the other line, the system is undercharged.
  5. If the system is undercharged or overcharged, have it checked by a professional air conditioning mechanic.
Fig. 3: Checking the refrigerant charge if the system has no sight glass. ac%204.jpg

Feb 28, 2011 | AdobeAir Alpine® RW4500 Thru-Wall/Window...

1 Answer

Air conditioner turns on but fan is locked up


System Inspection
Although the A/C system should not be serviced by the do-it-yourselfer, preventive maintenance can be practiced and A/C system inspections can be performed to help maintain the efficiency of the vehicle's A/C system. For A/C system inspection, perform the following: The easiest and often most important check for the air conditioning system consists of a visual inspection of the system components. Visually inspect the air conditioning system for refrigerant leaks, damaged compressor clutch, abnormal compressor drive belt tension and/or condition, plugged evaporator drain tube, blocked condenser fins, disconnected or broken wires, blown fuses, corroded connections and poor insulation.
CHECKING FOR OIL LEAKS Refrigerant leaks show up as oily areas on the various components because the compressor oil is transported around the entire system along with the refrigerant. Look for oily spots on all the hoses and lines, and especially on the hose and tubing connections. If there are oily deposits, the system may have a leak, and you should have it checked by a certified air conditioning specialist.
Fig. 1: Run your hand along the underside of all hose connections and check for leaks. If you find a leak, have it fixed by a certified air conditioning specialist.
check%20ac%20leak.jpg KEEPING THE CONDENSER CLEAR Periodically inspect the front of the condenser for bent fins or foreign material (dirt, bugs, leaves, etc.). If any cooling fins are bent, straighten them carefully. You can remove any debris with a stiff bristle brush.

Fig. 1: The position of the condenser in front of the radiator makes it particularly susceptible to collecting debris. Periodically, remove the accumulated bugs, leaves and other trash from the condenser. ac%202.gif
CHECKING THE REFRIGERANT LEVEL There are two ways to check refrigerant level. On vehicles equipped with sight glasses, checking the refrigerant level is a simple matter. Many late model vehicles, however, do not have a sight glass, and you have to check the temperature of the lines to determine the refrigerant level.
With Sight Glass The sight glass is normally located in the head of the receiver/drier. The receiver/drier is not hard to locate. It's a large metal cylinder that looks something like a fire extinguisher. Sometimes the sight glass is located in one of the metal lines leading from the top of the receiver/drier. Once you've found it, wipe it clean and proceed as follows:
  1. With the engine and the air conditioning system running, look for the flow of refrigerant through the sight glass. If the air conditioner is working properly, you'll be able to see a continuous flow of clear refrigerant through the sight glass, with perhaps an occasional bubble at very high temperatures.
  2. Cycle the air conditioner on and off to make sure what you are seeing is clear refrigerant. Since the refrigerant is clear, it is possible to mistake a completely discharged system for one that is fully charged. Turn the system off and watch the sight glass. If there is refrigerant in the system, you'll see bubbles during the off cycle. If you observe no bubbles when the system is running, and the airflow from the unit in the vehicle is delivering cold air, everything is OK.
  3. If you observe bubbles in the sight glass while the system is operating, the system is low on refrigerant. Have it checked by a professional.
  4. Oil streaks in the sight glass are an indication of trouble. Most of the time, if you see oil in the sight glass, it will appear as a series of streaks, although occasionally it may be a solid stream of oil. In either case, it means that part of the charge has been lost.
  1. Fig. 1: Oils streaks (A), constant bubbles (B) or foam (C) indicate there is not enough refrigerant in the system. Occasional bubbles during the initial operation are normal. A clear sight glass indicates a proper charge of refrigerant or no refrigerant at all, which can be determined by the presence of cold air at the outlets in the vehicle. If the glass is clouded with a milky white substance, have the receiver/dryer checked by a certified air conditioning specialist. ac%203.jpg

Without Sight Glass On vehicles that are not equipped with sight glasses, it is necessary to feel the temperature difference in the inlet and outlet lines at the receiver/drier to gauge the refrigerant level. Use the following procedure:
  1. Locate the receiver/drier. It will generally be up front near the condenser. It is shaped like a small fire extinguisher and will always have two lines connected to it. One line goes to the expansion valve and the other goes to the condenser.
  2. With the engine and the air conditioner running, hold a line in each hand and gauge their relative temperatures. If they are the same approximate temperatures, the system is correctly charged.
  3. If the line from the expansion valve to the receiver/drier is a lot colder than the line from the receiver/drier to the condenser, then the system is overcharged. It should be noted that this is an extremely rare condition.
  4. If the line that leads from the receiver/drier to the condenser is a lot colder than the other line, the system is undercharged.
  5. If the system is undercharged or overcharged, have it checked by a professional air conditioning mechanic.
Fig. 3: Checking the refrigerant charge if the system has no sight glass. ac%204.jpg

Feb 21, 2011 | Carrier 52CE-309 Cool Electric Heat Air...

1 Answer

Air conditioner


System Inspection
Although the A/C system should not be serviced by the do-it-yourselfer, preventive maintenance can be practiced and A/C system inspections can be performed to help maintain the efficiency of the vehicle's A/C system. For A/C system inspection, perform the following: The easiest and often most important check for the air conditioning system consists of a visual inspection of the system components. Visually inspect the air conditioning system for refrigerant leaks, damaged compressor clutch, abnormal compressor drive belt tension and/or condition, plugged evaporator drain tube, blocked condenser fins, disconnected or broken wires, blown fuses, corroded connections and poor insulation.
CHECKING FOR OIL LEAKS Refrigerant leaks show up as oily areas on the various components because the compressor oil is transported around the entire system along with the refrigerant. Look for oily spots on all the hoses and lines, and especially on the hose and tubing connections. If there are oily deposits, the system may have a leak, and you should have it checked by a certified air conditioning specialist.
Fig. 1: Run your hand along the underside of all hose connections and check for leaks. If you find a leak, have it fixed by a certified air conditioning specialist.
check%20ac%20leak.jpg KEEPING THE CONDENSER CLEAR Periodically inspect the front of the condenser for bent fins or foreign material (dirt, bugs, leaves, etc.). If any cooling fins are bent, straighten them carefully. You can remove any debris with a stiff bristle brush.

Fig. 1: The position of the condenser in front of the radiator makes it particularly susceptible to collecting debris. Periodically, remove the accumulated bugs, leaves and other trash from the condenser. ac%202.gif
CHECKING THE REFRIGERANT LEVEL There are two ways to check refrigerant level. On vehicles equipped with sight glasses, checking the refrigerant level is a simple matter. Many late model vehicles, however, do not have a sight glass, and you have to check the temperature of the lines to determine the refrigerant level.
With Sight Glass The sight glass is normally located in the head of the receiver/drier. The receiver/drier is not hard to locate. It's a large metal cylinder that looks something like a fire extinguisher. Sometimes the sight glass is located in one of the metal lines leading from the top of the receiver/drier. Once you've found it, wipe it clean and proceed as follows:
  1. With the engine and the air conditioning system running, look for the flow of refrigerant through the sight glass. If the air conditioner is working properly, you'll be able to see a continuous flow of clear refrigerant through the sight glass, with perhaps an occasional bubble at very high temperatures.
  2. Cycle the air conditioner on and off to make sure what you are seeing is clear refrigerant. Since the refrigerant is clear, it is possible to mistake a completely discharged system for one that is fully charged. Turn the system off and watch the sight glass. If there is refrigerant in the system, you'll see bubbles during the off cycle. If you observe no bubbles when the system is running, and the airflow from the unit in the vehicle is delivering cold air, everything is OK.
  3. If you observe bubbles in the sight glass while the system is operating, the system is low on refrigerant. Have it checked by a professional.
  4. Oil streaks in the sight glass are an indication of trouble. Most of the time, if you see oil in the sight glass, it will appear as a series of streaks, although occasionally it may be a solid stream of oil. In either case, it means that part of the charge has been lost.
  1. Fig. 1: Oils streaks (A), constant bubbles (B) or foam (C) indicate there is not enough refrigerant in the system. Occasional bubbles during the initial operation are normal. A clear sight glass indicates a proper charge of refrigerant or no refrigerant at all, which can be determined by the presence of cold air at the outlets in the vehicle. If the glass is clouded with a milky white substance, have the receiver/dryer checked by a certified air conditioning specialist. ac%203.jpg

Without Sight Glass On vehicles that are not equipped with sight glasses, it is necessary to feel the temperature difference in the inlet and outlet lines at the receiver/drier to gauge the refrigerant level. Use the following procedure:
  1. Locate the receiver/drier. It will generally be up front near the condenser. It is shaped like a small fire extinguisher and will always have two lines connected to it. One line goes to the expansion valve and the other goes to the condenser.
  2. With the engine and the air conditioner running, hold a line in each hand and gauge their relative temperatures. If they are the same approximate temperatures, the system is correctly charged.
  3. If the line from the expansion valve to the receiver/drier is a lot colder than the line from the receiver/drier to the condenser, then the system is overcharged. It should be noted that this is an extremely rare condition.
  4. If the line that leads from the receiver/drier to the condenser is a lot colder than the other line, the system is undercharged.
  5. If the system is undercharged or overcharged, have it checked by a professional air conditioning mechanic.
Fig. 3: Checking the refrigerant charge if the system has no sight glass. ac%204.jpg

Feb 19, 2011 | 1997 Suzuki Sidekick

1 Answer

Air conditioner leaking water from the unit inside


System Inspection
Although the A/C system should not be serviced by the do-it-yourselfer, preventive maintenance can be practiced and A/C system inspections can be performed to help maintain the efficiency of the vehicle's A/C system. For A/C system inspection, perform the following: The easiest and often most important check for the air conditioning system consists of a visual inspection of the system components. Visually inspect the air conditioning system for refrigerant leaks, damaged compressor clutch, abnormal compressor drive belt tension and/or condition, plugged evaporator drain tube, blocked condenser fins, disconnected or broken wires, blown fuses, corroded connections and poor insulation.
CHECKING FOR OIL LEAKS Refrigerant leaks show up as oily areas on the various components because the compressor oil is transported around the entire system along with the refrigerant. Look for oily spots on all the hoses and lines, and especially on the hose and tubing connections. If there are oily deposits, the system may have a leak, and you should have it checked by a certified air conditioning specialist.
Fig. 1: Run your hand along the underside of all hose connections and check for leaks. If you find a leak, have it fixed by a certified air conditioning specialist.
check%20ac%20leak.jpg KEEPING THE CONDENSER CLEAR Periodically inspect the front of the condenser for bent fins or foreign material (dirt, bugs, leaves, etc.). If any cooling fins are bent, straighten them carefully. You can remove any debris with a stiff bristle brush.

Fig. 1: The position of the condenser in front of the radiator makes it particularly susceptible to collecting debris. Periodically, remove the accumulated bugs, leaves and other trash from the condenser. ac%202.gif
CHECKING THE REFRIGERANT LEVEL There are two ways to check refrigerant level. On vehicles equipped with sight glasses, checking the refrigerant level is a simple matter. Many late model vehicles, however, do not have a sight glass, and you have to check the temperature of the lines to determine the refrigerant level.
With Sight Glass The sight glass is normally located in the head of the receiver/drier. The receiver/drier is not hard to locate. It's a large metal cylinder that looks something like a fire extinguisher. Sometimes the sight glass is located in one of the metal lines leading from the top of the receiver/drier. Once you've found it, wipe it clean and proceed as follows:
  1. With the engine and the air conditioning system running, look for the flow of refrigerant through the sight glass. If the air conditioner is working properly, you'll be able to see a continuous flow of clear refrigerant through the sight glass, with perhaps an occasional bubble at very high temperatures.
  2. Cycle the air conditioner on and off to make sure what you are seeing is clear refrigerant. Since the refrigerant is clear, it is possible to mistake a completely discharged system for one that is fully charged. Turn the system off and watch the sight glass. If there is refrigerant in the system, you'll see bubbles during the off cycle. If you observe no bubbles when the system is running, and the airflow from the unit in the vehicle is delivering cold air, everything is OK.
  3. If you observe bubbles in the sight glass while the system is operating, the system is low on refrigerant. Have it checked by a professional.
  4. Oil streaks in the sight glass are an indication of trouble. Most of the time, if you see oil in the sight glass, it will appear as a series of streaks, although occasionally it may be a solid stream of oil. In either case, it means that part of the charge has been lost.
  1. Fig. 1: Oils streaks (A), constant bubbles (B) or foam (C) indicate there is not enough refrigerant in the system. Occasional bubbles during the initial operation are normal. A clear sight glass indicates a proper charge of refrigerant or no refrigerant at all, which can be determined by the presence of cold air at the outlets in the vehicle. If the glass is clouded with a milky white substance, have the receiver/dryer checked by a certified air conditioning specialist. ac%203.jpg

Without Sight Glass On vehicles that are not equipped with sight glasses, it is necessary to feel the temperature difference in the inlet and outlet lines at the receiver/drier to gauge the refrigerant level. Use the following procedure:
  1. Locate the receiver/drier. It will generally be up front near the condenser. It is shaped like a small fire extinguisher and will always have two lines connected to it. One line goes to the expansion valve and the other goes to the condenser.
  2. With the engine and the air conditioner running, hold a line in each hand and gauge their relative temperatures. If they are the same approximate temperatures, the system is correctly charged.
  3. If the line from the expansion valve to the receiver/drier is a lot colder than the line from the receiver/drier to the condenser, then the system is overcharged. It should be noted that this is an extremely rare condition.
  4. If the line that leads from the receiver/drier to the condenser is a lot colder than the other line, the system is undercharged.
  5. If the system is undercharged or overcharged, have it checked by a professional air conditioning mechanic.
Fig. 3: Checking the refrigerant charge if the system has no sight glass. ac%204.jpg

Nov 14, 2010 | Whirlwind FH-778 Air Conditioner

1 Answer

When i turn on heater or fan engine revs over 3000 rpm


Idle Air Control Valve Pintle may be bad If you disconnect the IAC and the problem ceases it can point to this being the problem.: Removal & Installation 3.5L Engine To Remove:
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section.
  2. Remove the fuel injector sight shield.
  3. Drain the cooling system.
  4. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • The air cleaner intake duct. Figure of IAC and TPS electrical connectors disconnected. aurora_g1.gif

    • The idle air control (IAC) valve and throttle position (TP) sensor electrical connectors. Figure of cruise control and throttle control cables removed from throttle lever. aurora_g2.gif

    • The cruise control cable and throttle control cable from the throttle body lever.
    • The fuel pressure regulator vacuum hose, positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) hose and the throttle body vacuum port hose.
    • The throttle body coolant hoses.
    • The throttle control cable bracket, leaving the throttle and cruise cables connected.
    • The upper nut holding the throttle body to the intake manifold.
    • The throttle body assembly.
  5. Clean the gasket mating surfaces.
To Install:
  1. Install a new gasket and new studs if necessary.
  2. Install or connect the following:
    • The throttle body assembly.
    • Start the top nut by hand.
    • The throttle body coolant hoses.
    • Position the throttle control cable bracket and hand start the retaining nuts and bolt.
    • Torque the three throttle body retaining nuts to 89 in.lbs. (10 Nm). And the bracket retaining bolt to 115 in.lbs. (13 Nm).
    • The throttle body vacuum port hose, PCV valve hose and the fuel pressure regulator hose.
    • The throttle control and cruise control cables to the throttle body lever.
    • The IAC valve and TP sensor electrical connectors.
    • The air intake duct.
  3. Refill the cooling system.
  4. Install the fuel injector sight shield.
4.0L Engine To Remove:
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section.
  2. Relieve the fuel system pressure.
  3. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Negative battery cable.
    • The Mass Air Flow (MAF) sensor electrical connector.
    • The air cleaner intake duct.
    • The PCV valve fresh air tube. Figure of cruise control cable removed from throttle cable bracket. aurora_g3.gif

    • The cruise control cable and throttle control cable from the bracket.
    • The cruise control cable and throttle control cable from throttle body lever. Figure of IAC valve and TPS connectors removed. aurora_g4.gif

    • The idle air control (IAC) valve and throttle position (TP) sensor electrical connectors. Figure of fuel lines removed from retainer on throttle cable bracket. aurora_g5.gif

    • The fuel feed and return lines from the retainer on the throttle control cable bracket.
    • The transaxle shift cable clip from the throttle control cable bracket. Figure of throttle body removed from water crossover. aurora_g6.gif

    • The throttle body from the water crossover.
To Install:
NOTE: The Mass Air Flow (MAF) sensor inlet and the outlet of the air cleaner assembly must line up when installed. Misalignment may cause MIL illumination or driveability concerns.
  1. Install or connect the following.
    • The throttle body to the water crossover. Torque the bolts to 106 in.lbs. (12 Nm).
    • The IAC valve and TP sensor electrical connectors.
    • The throttle and cruise control cables to the throttle body lever.
    • The throttle and cruise control cables to the throttle control cable bracket. The transaxle shift cable clip to the throttle control cable bracket.
    • The fuel feed and return line retainer to the throttle control cable bracket.
    • The MAF sensor electrical connector.
    • The air cleaner intake duct clamp. Torque the clamp to 27 in.lbs. (3Nm).
    • The PCV valve fresh air tube.
    • The fuel injector sight shield. Torque the nuts to 20 in.lbs. (2.3 Nm).
  2. Install the negative battery cable.
  3. Pressurize the fuel system and verify no leaks.
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Oct 07, 2010 | 2001 Oldsmobile Alero

1 Answer

How to repair a supercharger


Fig. 1: Supercharger assembly and related parts 84303024.gif

REMOVAL & INSTALLATION
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Remove the accessory drive belt from the supercharger pulley.
  3. Relieve the fuel pressure and remove the fuel injector sight shield.
  4. Disconnect the fuel pipes from the fuel rail and vacuum hose at the pressure regulator.
  5. Disconnect the electrical connectors from the fuel injectors and remove the fuel rail mounting bolts. Remove the fuel rail with the injectors intact.
  6. Disconnect the electrical connectors at the IAC, TPS, MAF, EGR and boost control solenoid. Lay the wiring harness aside.
  7. Remove the air intake duct and remove the EGR pipe from the supercharger.
  8. Disconnect the throttle cable and the cruise control cable. Remove the cable bracket.
  9. Remove the tensioner bracket to supercharger mounting stud.
  10. Remove the supercharger to intake manifold bolts, remove the supercharger from the intake manifold. Remove the supercharger gasket and coolant passage O-rings. To install:
  11. Replace the oil passage O-rings and the supercharger gasket.
  12. Install the supercharger and bolts. Install the tensioner bracket-to-supercharger bolt. Tighten the bolts to 19 ft. lbs. (26 Nm).
  13. Install the cable bracket and connect the throttle and cruise control cables.
  14. Connect the EGR pipe to the supercharger and install the air intake duct.
  15. Connect the electrical connectors to the IAC, TPS, MAF, EGR and boost control solenoid.
  16. Install the fuel rail and bolts and tighten the bolts to 15 ft. lbs. (24 Nm).
  17. Connect the connectors to the fuel injectors and the vacuum hoses at the pressure regulator.
  18. Connect the fuel pipes to the fuel rail and install the fuel injector sight shield.
  19. Install the accessory drive belt to the supercharger and connect the negative battery cable.

Jul 14, 2010 | 1992 Buick Park Avenue

1 Answer

I need to reconnect my radiator in my 2000 ls v8


For 2000 Lincoln LS 3.9L SFI DOHC 8cyl...
Radiator - Removal & Installation
  1. Drain the engine cooling system.
  2. Remove the upper radiator sight shield.
  3. Remove the air cleaner outlet tube.
  4. Remove the six bolts and the two radiator upper support brackets.
  5. Remove the upper radiator hose.
  6. Remove the bolt and position the receiver drier aside.
  7. Disconnect the dual flow coolant valve electrical connector and the A/C line from the fan shroud.
  8. 3.0L engines only:
    Disconnect the Throttle Position (TP) sensor and the Idle Air Control (IAC) valve electrical connectors.
  9. Remove the bolts.
  10. Remove the bracket.
  11. 3.9L engines only:
    Remove the bolt and position the electric water pump aside.
  12. Disconnect the high pressure cooling fan bracket and line.
  13. Inspect the seal and install a new seal if necessary.
  14. Disconnect the return hose from the cooling fan and shroud.
  15. Separate the return hose from the fan shroud and position aside.
  16. Remove the two bolts and the fan shroud assembly.
  17. Remove the A/C condenser.
  18. Remove the two bolts and position the multi-cooler assembly aside.
  19. Remove the bolts and the condenser support brackets.
  20. Remove the radiator.

To install:
  1. Install the following:

    Radiator Condenser support brackets Multi-cooler assembly A/C condenser Fan shroud assembly
  2. Connect the return hose to the fan shroud
  3. Connect the high pressure cooling fan bracket and line.
  4. 3.9L engines only:
    Replace the bolt and position the electric water pump aside.
  5. 3.0L engines only:
    Connect the Throttle Position (TP) sensor and the Idle Air Control (IAC) valve electrical connectors.
  6. Replace the following
    The upper radiator sight shield. The air cleaner outlet tube. The six bolts and the two radiator upper support brackets. The upper radiator hose. The bolt and position the receiver drier aside.

Hope help with this (remember rated and comment this).

Mar 17, 2010 | 2000 Lincoln LS

2 Answers

Water over flows think its the water sensor


It's likely just the hose to the pressure (water level) switch that has come loose or fallen off. Remove the console screws and flip back the console to get access to the pressure switch and the connections. If the connection end of the pressure switch hose looks "stretched", trim 1/4" off and re-seat it.
If the hose looks ok (no cracks or splits), check the other end of the hose which connects to the side of the tub.
The see if the pressure switch is faulty, remove the pressure switch hose and attach a small hose to the pressure switch. Blow into it gently and listen for "clicking". Test with a fill to see if the switch shuts off the water valve.

Let me know if you need more assistance. If so, please post your model number.
Good luck!

Apr 08, 2009 | GE WBSR3140DW Top Load Washer

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