Question about Honeywell HFS641P Stand (Pedestal) Fan

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Hi i am working as an electrical installer and would like to know where i can access all the electrical drawings for all the different heating systems Honeywell

Please could you give me a web address where i can access all drawings for all different honeywell heating sytems ie y plans s plans w plans 3 valve sytems etc thanks i d be most grateful

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Re: Hi i am working as an electrical installer and would...


try this.. all honewell drawings.. in it

Posted on Jun 07, 2009

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Not working ,may be fuse blown out

Inside the wiring of the motor is allways a thermal fuse in included by manufacture and its inside or a heat shrink or an colored kind of seal like every transformer have inside it it is to fireprotect , if you every time if after a long time not used the fan will start then take a little wd40 every time on the shaft then it function for years because the sintra sleeve bearings can become dry and tough and the motor draws excitement and then the thermal fuse blows. to protect your home for fire replace only with the same tempfuse and do not forget to take between the legs use pliers between the soldering tip that pulls the solder heat directly into the fuse because otherwise directly broken


Apr 27, 2016 | Dyson AM06 Table Fan

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How to turn hunter thermastat model 44134 on

This question needs to be reclassified with aftermarket programmable home thermostats--not fans.

Hunter 44134

Getting the wiring connections correct to the terminals in the back plate is essential. Understanding better which colored wires do what functions for your particular brand and model of HVAC gear proves essential, too: "That's the rub!"

Unlike the brilliant and wisely-instituted electrical code, a sensible common "code" for HVAC thermostat wires doesn't exist--each brand, and many models represented by such brands--may have their own peculiar wiring color conventions. HVAC techs also have noted the increasing numbers of brands and models in the market these days, as well--thus, they too may resort to online help threads concerning such issues. (Certainly, the wiring conventions for heat pumps differs also from that of a conventional heat/air setup.)

Unfortunately, many of Youtube's demonstrations from HVAC pros prove merely general info concerning HVAC systems--these may prove somewhat useful: Being merely general info, they're often not specific enough always for particular units, though. (This proves keenly true concerning thermostat wiring.)

Always switch off the circuit breaker for your HVAC system before proceeding with wiring. My system is a Goodman heat pump--it uses a five-wire thermostat setup: The 44134 model from Hunter doesn't feature a terminal in the back plate for the "C" wire for that. (The blue wire from my Goodman heat pump is the "Comm" or "C" wire--that's very confusing in it's own way--the "B" terminal on the back plate for the 44134, and most other programmable thermostats, often is used with B-coded wires for other manufacturers' HVAC units--generally, "B" wires for such units are blue, as well--beware of reliance upon wiring colors!)

Hunter's FAQs clearly indicate that the "C" wire connection isn't always necessary, nor appropriate, for their thermostats--their 44134 is one isn't an exception. I twisted on a small, gray wirenut onto end of my blue Comm wire, further securing that better with electrical tape. (Simply wrapping the Comm wire well with electrical tape should prove also sufficient.)

Unless you know your system's peculiar wiring very well (that is, you're likely an HVAC tech), don't try to connect a Comm wire to another terminal on the back plate for the 44134--you'll likely ruin your thermostat (perhaps along with some other HVAC electronics): You may need then to get an HVAC tech out, after all!

As indicated above, don't merely "match" wiring colors (as a woman might for interior decorating or remodeling)!: This proves a continuing and overly common, comical mistake! Prove instead somewhat skeptical of thermostat wiring colors! A Biblical scripture applies: "Be as wise as serpents!" Take your time to get wiring connections right!

I've noted that the 44134 unit relies totally upon 2 AA batteries (not supplied in the package)--those must be in good working order and oriented correctly--otherwise, your thermostat and HVAC system won't function. Furthermore, the control unit may be easily removed from the back plate--thus allowing "easy-chair" configuration--again, HVAC and fan functions will halt immediately--the connected unit proves necessary for continued function.

Hunter also points out (on their packaging as well) that the 44134 (and, many other (if not all) Hunter thermostats) won't work with baseboard heating systems. Hunter's site FAQs prove too sparse--some may prove keenly useful, nonetheless.

I can't yet get my heat pump system to work with Hunter's "always on" fan switch setting--the rightmost "Auto/On" setting for that bottom-mounted switch at the right. Perhaps a jumper wire proves necessary in the back plate terminals--somewhere. (I've noted this also for Hunter's common 44277 model, as well.) I glean perhaps that somehow invoking the "G" terminal proves necessary. As usual, investigation proves warranted.

Definitely note the "Cool, Off, Heat" switch on the bottom left of the unit: Yeah, that's all too easy to forget. The Hunter 44134 doesn't provide any feature allowing automatic switching between heating and cooling--one must choose which function for the thermostat to control. If the switch is set to "Heat," cooling isn't possible--and, vice-versa.

For reference and troubleshooting, keep the manual and install instructions in a safe, memorable, and easily accessible place. Hunter does provide PDF manual versions online--installation instructions prove lacking online though--they're not in the user manual, either. Unfortunately, Hunter doesn't upgrade it's PDF manual versions.

I glean that Honeywell units may prove generally more easily configurable than Hunter units. Nonetheless, configuring Hunter units proves far from impossible, though. Configuring Hunter thermostats prove perhaps not as "intuitive.": The formal user manuals provided by Hunter thus may prove more keenly necessary for their thermostats' configuration.

Getting personal help online from Hunter may prove somewhat difficult (that may have changed recently). A few years ago, I called customer support: A woman answered my wiring question very satisfactorily. (I noted a jumper wire connect to the terminals of my old manual thermostat--she indicated that the jumper proves unnecessary in Hunter units.) Hunter phone support hours prove somewhat limited--they're similar to traditional office hours.

As with most programmable thermostats, the Hunter is a PRC (Chinese)-fabricated general-purpose consumer circuitry device. As such, it's (overly) intended to be wired and configured by the user to provide correct function for many particular and compatible HVAC brands/models. Given the particular installation that may perhaps prove difficult. Given the general-purpose nature of such thermostats, a simple installation sheet of instructions can't always offer sufficient and correct answers.

Without the particulars of your HVAC system and thermostat wiring, it proves very difficult in some cases for Fixya and other DIY sites to provide correct answers. (Most DIYers ultimately do succeed with install and use of programmable thermostats, though.)

"Proust" thanks you for getting this far!: Perhaps some of my particular solutions here do prove useful to some of you--more nit-picking, detailed work and anecdotes (intended for specific brands and models) needs to be offered in this area....

Mar 17, 2013 | Fans

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My whitewestinghouse dryer trumble but no heat

Hi, If you are having problems with your gas dryer not heatingthe most common problem is that the ignitor goes bad. Even though it glowssometimes it is still not working properly. if you dryer is gas check out this gas no heat tip.... If you have an electric dryer, you can have many differentthings that can go wrong causing the dryer not to heat. check outthis electric no heat tip...


Apr 27, 2011 | Westinghouse Industrial Plus White-...

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Why won't our blower turn off?

It seems that you have the emergency heat running all the time. On some t-stats there is a switch that runs the emergency heat all the time.
The other thing that could be happening is that the out door unit is stuck in defrost so the backup heat is trying to run any time you are in heating mode.
Without checking what is energizing the heat coils with an electric meter it is impossible to tell what exactly is going on.
I can tell you that I'm sure that it is related to the emergency heat, though and if you can shut off the breaker that runs that for now it will help you out till you can get it looked at futher.

I hope that this will help you to solve your problem!

Thanks for using Fixya!!


Dec 20, 2009 | Hunter Fan Company 5/1/1 Programmable...

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Air and heat have both been running on Hunter 44155C

There should be a switch on the thermostat.
And another switch
Normally, you just set it for heat or AC and set the fan for auto. If it isn't wired correctly, the switches won't make any difference. It will either run all of the time or not at all.

Feb 17, 2009 | Hunter Fan Company 5/1/1 Programmable...

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Not heat on 1st and 2nd floor but basement is great

I can help, but I need a little more info. What kind of boiler do you have, and is it gas, oil, or electric heated, and do you have an air seperator with an expansion tank on it. It basically sounds like you are not moving water through the system. The only to causes for this would be a bad circulator pump, or it is simply air locked. I would check out the circulator pump first. It will most likely be attached to the boiler, and will be in line on the main pipe coming out of the boiler. It is driven by electric, so check out the wiring, and electric supply going to it. There are many brands of these pumps out there. The most common are Taco, Garfundos, and Bell & Gossit. If the pump is pumping, then I would find the highest point of the system and bleed it from there. This can sometimes be a timely undertaking. Just because you are not getting any air out immediately, doesn't mean it isn't there. A good rule of thumb is to take out a gallon of water. If you don't get any air then, your probably good to go. Also remember to make sure your supply water valve is open to put that water back in. Let me know how you do...Rob

Jan 19, 2009 | House Brand Heating&Air Conditioning...

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Fixing Ceiling Fan

An easy-to-install ceiling fan can make a real difference in your home's climate - both cooling and heating - at a far lower cost and operating expense than almost any other item.
The installation begins with choosing where the fan should be located. In almost all homes, the fan is installed in the center of the room, replacing a central light fixture. This spot provides a smooth air flow to most of the room. Since a fan draws about the same power as a ceiling fixture, the electrical circuit shouldn't be overloaded. But if your fan includes lights, be sure the circuit it's on has enough extra capacity to handle the load. If not, you must run a new circuit with a new circuit breaker from the house main service panel or subpanel to the fan. If there is no central light fixture, you'll have to create a place to hang the ceiling fan. Then, you'll need to bring electrical power to it. You can tap into an existing circuit to do this.

Sep 25, 2008 | Fans

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Whole house fan does not draw air

capacitor is worned out so pl change the condensor and u ll find the difference out lot of air moving around u

Jul 28, 2008 | Ventamatic Direct Drive Whole House Fan...

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How to wire hunter 44155

Go to the hunter web site. They will have the proper wiring diagrams on the site. If you cannot do that pick up a basic wiring book at your local electric parts supplier. the place you got the thermostat would be a good start. I do know that menards has some books in the electric area that would be a great help to you. You also will need to be sure that the thermostat is able to handle both air and heat. many only do heat. If this does not help let me know and I will try and get more information to you

Feb 07, 2008 | Hunter Fan Company 5/1/1 Programmable...

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