Question about Nikon D50 Digital Camera with 18-55mm Lens

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Focus How do you take out the focus option, in order to get a fully focused image without depth?

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Re: Focus

What is the focal length of your lens?

In order to work with depth-of-field, two things are essentially contributors to fully focused image without depth, 1) it depends on your lens focal length 18-70mm or 70-200mm, 2) your f-stop. 2.8 (large iris) or 30 (small iris).

Simply put, a smaller iris (>15 fstop) increases the DOF, or makes things in front-of and behind the subject more visible/clear. Larger iris (<15 ftop) reduces the DOF, or makes things in front-of and behind the subject less focused/recognizable.

There's quite a lot that goes in to DOF, so check out the link above for the details.

Posted on Nov 23, 2007

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Aperture remains fully open, cannot adjust

If its just how to change the settings on your camera then your manual will tell you how. If you mean how changing these settings effects the final outcome of your photograph then I can recommend Langfords Starting Photography book which will explain all you need to know regarding these.
Its best to keep your ISO as low as possible in order to avoid noise in your images, however night shoots need a higher ISO but a tripod is recommended to avoid picture shake.
Shutter speed determines how long the camera shutter stays open letting let in. Shutter speed is often shown as 1/125 or 1/15 for example and what this actually means is that the shutter will stay open to let light in for either 125th or 15th of a second. By changing how shutter speed is set alters the final outcome of your image. Let's say you wanted to take a photo of a waterfall and you wanted to freeze the action so that you could see the waters movement clearly, then you would use a fast shutter speed such as 1/500 or higher. However, instead if you wanted the water to look blurred then you would use a slow shutter speed such as 1/15 or lower.
Aperture which is also known as f numbers are often shown as F2.8 or F8 for example, and these can affect depth of field. Depth of field determines just how much or how little of your final image remains in focus. By choosing a high f number like F8 or higher means that the majority of your final image will be in focus whereas, a low f number like F2.8 or lower makes the foreground stay in focus and the background will be blurred.
Hope this helps.....


Apr 09, 2011 | Digital Cameras


Depth of field is the characteristic of how much of, or how deeply, the...

Depth of field is the characteristic of how much of, or how deeply, the photograph is in focus. If the main subject is in focus but the foreground and background are blurred, the photo is said to have a shallow depth of field. if most of the photo is in focus, including the foreground and background, the photo is said to have a wide depth of field.

Depth of field is controlled by the aperture setting:

- A wide aperture setting (indicated by a low f-stop number) will provide shallow depth of field, resulting in the main subject being in focus and the foreground and background being blurry. This setting is particularly useful when taking portraits or when using a macro lens.

- A narrow aperture setting (indicated by a higher f-stop number) will provide wider depth of field, resulting in the entire photo being in focus. This setting is particularly useful when taking landscape or wide-angle photographs.

The photographs below are examples of how the same subject will photograph using different aperture settings. Note that as the aperture closes, which will allow less light to reach the image sensor, the shutter speed gets faster to produce the appropriate exposure.





I think you have got a general idea about depth filed. If you have further questions, you can ask me directly.

depth of field - what is depth field - how depth field affects picture - how to adjust depth field - DEPTH FIELD - depthfield - DEPTHFIELD

on Jan 08, 2011 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W50 Digital Camera

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I got a Nikon D5000 and 18-55mm lens. When I take pictures using focal between 18-24 mm the deep of field is not sharp especially for landscape pictures. I made at list 200 pictures (the same image) test...

We need to understand Depth of Field first. Depth of field increase in two ways, one with the Aperture setting and one with the distance the lens is focused on. Example, at F22 focused at 10 feet the Depth of Field will be (assume for the example) from 7ft to 20 ft. You need to use the camera in aperture mode, set it to a "Slow" aperture, the larger the number the slower the aperture. Example F2.8 is "fast or Open, F22 is slow or "closed". The problem is not in your lens or camera. To get maximum Depth of fuield you need to shoot in Aperture Mode, set the f-stop to F11 or slower, F16, F22. The use manual focus to focus the lens. Using auto focus is "ok" for many scenes but to get MAX Depth of field you cannot let the camera select the object to focus on. Here is the BEST way to do it. Setup your camera in Aperture mode, set F-stops as suggested above. Focus on the subject that you want and shoot. Dont forget, the camera will be using slow shutter speeds like this so camera shake will create blurr that can be confused with out of focus. Shooting slow at F11 to F22 usually required a good tripod. Also, another thing to know, Field of focus is deeper "behind" the spot you are focusing on than in "Frint" of the point you are focused on. Good luck, Worm1855

Dec 28, 2010 | Nikon D5000 Digital Camera

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How to blur the background in picture taking?

Get another camera :-(

You want to reduce the depth-of-field so that the subject is in focus while the foreground and background are out of focus and blurred. Depth of field (DoF) is dependent on three factors: distance, lens aperture, and lens focal length.

The farther the subject, the deeper the DoF. If you take a picture of a distant mountain peak, the mountain behind that and sunlit the clouds on the horizon will also be in focus. If you get close enough to a flower, you might get the front petals in focus while the petals in the back might blur.

The smaller the lens aperture, the deeper the DoF. Landscape mode, for example, will try to use a smaller aperture in order to get everything in focus while portrait mode will try to use a larger aperture in order to blur the background.

The shorter the lens focal length, the deeper the DoF. This is the killer. Due to the small size of the image sensor, the EX-Z750 has a very short lens: 7.9mm to 23.7mm. Even at the telephoto end of the range, 23.7mm would be considered very wide by film photograpers. A 24mm lens would give film photographers a sharp shot from foreground to horizon and, unfortunately, you're seeing that as well.

Note that the DoF is dependent on the actual focal length, not the 35mm equivalent you may have read about. This is a law of physics, not something that lens designers can easily alter.

Mar 04, 2010 | Casio Exilim EX-Z750 Digital Camera

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What is the solution

You are dealing with "depth of field", or simply put (?), the range from near to far of an image that appears in focus. To increase the depth of focus, the camera must be set to a smaller aperture (higher numbered). Using a wider angle lens helps also. Focusing on the mid-point (near to far range) will also increase the apparent focus range. This is one of the most complicated photographic issues, and much has been written about it. Google "depth of field" for about 4 million explanations.

May 26, 2009 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Set up for canon 30D EOS for intraoral pictures, to ger everything in focus.

still not sure what introral is???...but your depth of field.... ( how much of image is in focus) dependent on aperture setting ..the higher the number..(smaller the aperture) the more of the image will be in focus at once (front to back).... so set camera to Tv setting for aperture priority..set that number to f8 or above... f11- f16 f22 preferably and shoot away knowing you will get things in focus from close to far away

Nov 24, 2008 | Canon Digital Cameras

2 Answers

Samsung digital s73 camera

Hi, there are many reasons why a camera may produce less then sharp pictures.

1) Dirty, oily or damaged lens: Check for dust and fingerprints.
Clean lenses with extreme caution, using dry lens paper.
Use only minimal pressure and gently wipe from the center
outwards, NEVER in circles.

If the lens is really dirty, ask a professional photo dealer to
clean it for you as a free courtesy.

2) Check to see if the auto-focus is working correctly, this could
be an electronic or mechanical problem requiring servicing.
Focus the camera on sharp image at various distances,
to see if it responds by moving the lens.

3) Can you focus the camera manually?

4) Can you focus by moving the camera back and forth
in regards to the object of interest?

5) Is the auto-focus feature somehow disabled in the menus ?

6) Are the batteries up to snuff, they may be strong enough to
turn on the camera, but too weak to move the focus motor.

7) Is the subject you are trying to focus on out of the
focus range of the lens: i.e. too close ?

8) Is the subject you are focusing on too bland, with insufficient
detail to activate and lock the auto-focus.

9) Do you have enough light for the auto-focus to operate.

10) Does the flash unit project an red pattern to help with

11) Are you mistaking sharpness (focus) for depth of field.
In low light conditions, the lens iris opens wide, just
like your eye, to let more light in.

This results in a loss of focussed depth of field. This
means that focusing becomes much more sensitive
and critical, such that (when) the main subject is in focus,
everything behind and in front of the subject is not.

This is a theoretical limitation of all optical lenses:
The greater the focal length and the greater the aperture,
the shorter the depth of field.

This can actually be very beneficial when shooting a
portrait: Focus on the eyebrows, blur the background,

or it can be very detrimental: When trying to magnify
a butterfly on a tulip in low light conditions, getting
everything in focus is impossible.

12) Are you mistaking motion blur with lack of focus,
due to slow shutter speeds.

13) Are you shooting in very low light conditions,
causing the picture to become more noisy,
due to the way the digital camera sensor works.

14) I you come up empty on all these suggestions,
you probably have a defective camera and it is
warranty time:

a) Defective electronics
b) Defective auto-focus mechanism
c) Defective lens, loose internal elements
d) Detached sensor chip
.... etc

Try to isolate the problem. Try to manually and
automatically focus on a wide range of subjects,
at various distances, in bright daylight conditions.

If you are still unable to focus the camera,
it is probably defective and requires replacement
or servicing

Quick review of the internet, indicates that
this particular model is notorious for high battery drain
and battery connection problems. This may be the cause
of poor auto focus as indicated above.

Also this camera has insufficient internal memory, and
and an add-on memory card is required. It is possible
that without the memory card, the camera is defaulting
to a very low pixel resolution, in order to save memory
space, thus creating the appearance of poor focus.

The nominal resolution of the camera = 7.2 Mega Pixels
is respectable for such a low cost camera, but the
reliability reviews are not good.


Apr 24, 2008 | Samsung Digimax S730 Digital Camera

1 Answer

After upgrading the DiMAGE 7 to the Optional Enhancement software, when AF is confirmed on the DiMAGE 7 the live image on the LCD stops, is this a problem?

This is not a problem. In order to achieve faster AF operation, the live image on the LCD is not refreshed during focusing. During flex focus point, the live image on LCD never stops. If you feel anxious about the live image stoping, we recommend you to use flex focus point.

Sep 15, 2005 | Konica Minolta DiMAGE 7 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Focus Problem

A small amount of dirt on the lens would just produce some flare and redule overall contrast slightly. It wouldn't produce a grossly out of focus image. Either you misaligned something or you messed up the autofocus system somehow. Can you focus the lens manually. Many consumer grade digital cameras allow you to set the focus at some specific distance. Do that measuring the distance carefully, and see if the image is still out of focus. Digital cameras tend to have a lot of depth of field, so there must be something seriously wrong with the mechanism.

Sep 12, 2005 | Fuji FinePix 2650 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Focus on a particular subject?

If the camera is having trouble doing an auto focus you can try the FOCUS LOCK feature. This feature allows you to focus on another subject roughly the same distance away from you, and then move the camera back to your original subject and take your picture without losing that focus. First turn the camera on and locate the AutoFocus Target Mark in the center of the LCD. The AF Target Mark resembles an open and close bracket [ ]. Position this AF Target Mark on a subject roughly the same distance away from you as the subject that the camera is having trouble focusing on. Press the shutter button halfway enabling the lens to focus. While keeping the shutter button pressed halfway, move the camera back to include the subject you originally wanted in the image, then press the shutter fully. (Please see page 42 in the D-535 Zoom Reference Manual in Section 3, under the heading titled “If Correct Focus Cannot Be Obtained”, for a more detailed explanation.)

Aug 31, 2005 | Olympus D-535 Zoom / C370 Zoom Digital...

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