Question about RCA RS2656 Shelf System

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Full sound not working

The speakers seem to not be working correctly because only the tweeters are working and no bass or anything full is coming through.

I've tried the power source, unplugging the speakers re-plugging them and all that. I haven't opened the stereo up yet. Some help would be appreciated!

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  • Anonymous Nov 18, 2007

    same here....i had it cranked (which it does wonderfully) and think it may have overheated :(

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I had the same problem and also traced it back to two of the four 7-amp fuses were blown. I replaced the fuses, but they immediately blew again. I used higher capacity fuses (10 amp) to see how bad the problem was and those blew. Testing the problem a third time with the speakers disconnected yielded the same results.
There's an internal short in the system.
The solution? Don't buy RCA again.

Posted on Mar 12, 2011

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Upon opening it up i saw 2 of the 4 7amp fuses were blown....nice to actually see fuses in this day and age ;)
i replaced them and they instantly blew again....
i must go further and try to figure it out because i hate change.....there are no systems out there in any price range that i woud want to take the place of this one for me.

Posted on Nov 27, 2007

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2 Answers

My jamo d115 speaker tweeter distorts or rattels when any serious bass kicks in, how do you stop this?w


Possible this is a distortion from the Amplifier if the speakers are not damaged. however it is important to switch the speakers to confirm if the fault is relative to the particular channel in which case the amplifier is faulty. If not the speaker can be the culprit. All what is needed is to reduce the BASS level a bit lower when the volume is increased so as to allow the cross over to work. Also if teh cross- over network is faulty within the speaker the bass can vibrate on the tweeter.

Dec 01, 2011 | Jamo Audio Players & Recorders

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Buzzing noise z4 logitech speakers


Hi Haley,
I also enjoy good Music and excellent sound from my speakers that i have and know what you going through. There is two problems that i see here. One is that your bass speakers is dying on you from the excess bass that has been exerted throught it or have you tried lowering the adjusting bass from the contol panel?
Try adjusting the bass and if that doesnt work aleast you've identified your problem.
Thanks Haley for using Fixya.Good Luck.

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Nov 03, 2011 | Logitech Z-4 Computer Speakers

1 Answer

No sound from tweeter bx5a


First of all, never connect the audio from your receiver directly to the tweeter. You can blow the tweeter instantly. The mid-bass driver can be damaged from a direct connection as well.

Since you get absolutely no sound from either driver, this seems to implicate the crossover. If the crossover has opened, no signal gets through, if it has opened early in the signal path.

But, it is also possible that a short exists, and that perhaps your amp cuts off the output having sensed a short. The short could be in the crossover or one of the drivers.

Here are some troubleshooting tips--

To prevent damage to your amp, turn it off while making or breaking any connections inside the speaker boxes.

Write down which wires get connected to which place on the drivers, so you can get them back where they belong.

With your amp turned off, connect the bad speaker to your amp. You've already verified that no sound is produced when both drivers are connected.

So, with your amp off, disconnect one wire from the tweeter in the bad box.

Briefly turn your amp on and listen for sound.

If you get sound, the tweeter is shorted.

If you get no sound, with the amp off, reconnect the tweeter in the bad box and disconnect one wire from the mid-bass driver.

Briefly turn the amp on and listen before turning the amp off.

If you get sound now, but not before, the mid-bass driver is shorted.

If you got no sound either way, check the DC resistance of the mid-bass driver (only, not the tweeter. Ohmmeters put out a small DC voltage to test resistance. That DC voltage might damage a tweeter, maybe. Don't risk it). Ohm the mid-bass driver while it is not connected to the crossover. If the driver is good, you should read some ohms--a little less than the stated impedance. An 8 ohm driver might read 6.5 ohms, for instance. If you get an open or a short (with the crossover disconnected from the mid-bass driver) you have a blown driver. Two actually, since neither the tweeter nor the mid-bass driver produced any sound in the previous tests.

If you can't get ahold of an ohmmeter, try this--

Open the good, working speaker and place the two side by side.

Connect your amp to the bad speaker box only.

With your amp turned off, disconnect the wires from the mid-bass driver in the bad box and connect them to the mid-bass driver in the good box. Disconnect one of the wires from the "good" mid-bass driver first, so you don't have two crossovers connected to it at the same time--even if only one of them will get powered on. It keeps the confusion down to a minimum when trying to isolate your problem. Oh, and disconnect one wire from the bad tweeter, in case it is shorted.

Turn the amp on and listen briefly before turning the amp off.

If you got sound, the "bad" crossover is fine, but the "bad" mid-bass driver is blown. And, since you got no sound in the previous tests, the "bad" tweeter is blown, as well.

If you got no sound, try it the other way around. Meaning--

With the amp off, disconnect the speaker wires coming from your amp from the bad speaker box and connect them to the good speaker box.

Your amp is now connected only to the good speaker box.

With the amp still off, connect the mid-bass wires from the good box to the mid-bass driver in the bad box. Remember to disconnect one of the "bad" crossover wires from its own driver first, so only one crossover is connected to the "bad" mid-midbass driver. Remember to disconnect one wire from the "good" and "bad" tweeters, so the only sound you hear--if any--is from the "bad" mid-bass driver, powered by the "good" crossover.

If this produces sound, but the previous attempts failed, you have a crossover problem.

If you still get no sound, something went wrong and you need to retest the good speaker by itself and back up a few steps and try again.

Assuming you got sound from the "good" crossover while it was driving your "bad" mid-bass, make sure no wires have come loose inside the "bad" box. Assuming you have sound connections at each end of each wire, you now need to desolder the electrolytic capacitors from the circuit board.

Make sure you mark them first, so you can put them back where they belong.

You can remove only one at a time, if that helps.

Use an ohmmeter to check some components.

The big red coil should read pretty close to a short, maybe one ohm.

The capacitors should read open or infinite resistance, although you might see a steadily increasing resistance while the capacitor charges up from the ohmmeter. If you read a steady low resistance on a capacitor after it has been removed from the circuit board, that capacitor is bad and must be replaced. The markings on the capacitor should give you some clues as to the proper replacement.

All things considered, I suspect that your problem is a shorted electrolytic capacitor. But, I gave you all I could think of so you can narrow it down and isolate the problem, whatever it might be.

I hope this helps.

Feb 23, 2011 | M-Audio BX5a Speaker

1 Answer

Can't get wharfedale melton 2 tweeter to work. Looked inside cabinet and need advice on internal wiring please. These are very old, but one works perfectly and the 12'' bass driver on the problem speaker...


All the electronic parts you can see inside the speaker (usually capacitors, coils and resistors) are responsible for breaking the full audio band (bass - middle - treble) in parts (2 for your case) and feed each part to the appropriate speaker. By that I mean that you must not use your speaker without the cross-over (this is the name of the circuit) since this can harm your speakers. The sound from a speaker without crossover will be terrible for your ears too. Eventhually you can try to connect your tweeterat the amplifier's output leads, assuming that the volume level will be very low. Using this connection you can just check if the tweeter is working ok or not, so you can find where is the problem. By the way I don't think that a coil is burned out, try to see some resistor possible burned out.

In case of a problem or clarification, don't hesitate to post.

Thanks and regards
Please kindly rate this solution
Stelios
direct FixYa link: http://www.fixya.com/users/technical114

Mar 21, 2010 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Hiss from the tweeter nothing from the sub


Trash. Don't run your bass through speakers not designed for it. Likewise (from personal experience) don't allow microphone feedback to get into consumer speakers. Bye-bye tweeters in either case.

Nov 05, 2008 | JBL EON 15-G2 Powered DJ Speaker With EQ...

1 Answer

Tweeters & Midrange Speakers


If you have a Ohm Meter, check the resistance to the speakers. If it is very high, the speakers are burned, (or the crossover is (just capacitors, and resisters...cheap)). If it is close to 4 ohms check the wiring and connectors..to and at the speakers, most likly the receiver/amp is not blown.

Apr 20, 2008 | KLH 1230SB Main / Stereo Speaker

1 Answer

No sound from mids and bass


there is prolly just a short in the wire somewhere

Nov 28, 2007 | RCA RS2656 Shelf System

1 Answer

My speakers sound flat with no highs at all


I am trying to work out if you have damaged the speakers and amp too.
Have you tried a pair of headphones on the amp? If they sound ok then your amp is fine.
Assuming it is, then speakers have what's called crossover units in side each of them. This splits the sound into three parts. Bass, midrange, treble. The bass is handled by the woofer's, the midrange by a middle sized speaker or or it's combined with a tweeter, which of course handles the treble.
Connecting a 1.5 volt battery across any of the individual speakers will cause it to pop if working. If the speaker then is not getting sound then the crossover unit is to blame.
When you look at the crossover unit, it will have coils and capacitors (non polarised) on it. The bigger ones deal with the bass and the smaller ones treble. If you find a fault say on the crossover of the speaker, for example no treble comes out of it. Then start by replacing the capacitors. Use the same value as on the capacitor and remember they fit any way round.

Apr 14, 2017 | Paradigm Audio Players & Recorders

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