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For some reason my 909 when in play the tape will jump off track in either direction. Is there an alignment issue?

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There could be dirt on the capstan shafts or the Pinch Rollers are worn uneven or dirty. There is a lot to check besides this. I have a bunch of them in shop now but they do not have this problem.

Posted on Dec 14, 2014

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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2 Answers

How to tune a vcr


I assume you are talking about the tracking control. Older VCRs had a control that allowed you to make adjustments within a narrow range by turning a knob and newer machines have auto-tracking. The adjustment allows very limited adjustment of electronic centering of the read heads over the recorded video track on the tape. The mechanical and electronic alignment of tape head tracking is a precision process that requires specialized alignment tools and a "standard" pre-recorded test tape. These tapes are very expensive and not as precise as one would hope. In addition, like all magnetic tapes, they stretch and must be replaced. The theory is that if multiple VCRs are aligned on the these standard alignment tapes, all machines will then track and reproduce material alike. Unfortunately, there are so many standard tapes in the world with so much variation that things do not always work well. If you cannot get your machine to play a tape recorded on another machine to track correctly, you could take it to a repair man and have him align it, but it is no guarantee it will track all the time on all tapes. That is why the world has moved on to digital recording.

Jan 11, 2015 | Televison & Video

2 Answers

Play back/recording of tapes


check the conections if some where loose.

Aug 25, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

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How a VCR and Videotape Work and the Most Common Problems


A common complaint about videotape is that over time, playback becomes unstable and often deteriorates to the point that the tape becomes unplayable or that the tape works on one VCR, but not another. All of these problems can be traced to tape path alignment in the VCR and damage to the tape itself. I will address each issue separately.
First you need to understand a little about the tape media. When you record on VHS videotape, the recorder lays down three (four for stereo sound) magnetic tracks on the ½ inch wide tape. Analog audio is recorded along the top edge as a thin horizontal stripe (or parallel stripes for stereo) for the entire length of the recording. In the center of the tape, video is recorded as diagonal parallel stripes by two or four heads that rotate on a drum at 360 RPM. On the bottom edge (the most vulnerable place for damage to occur) there is another horizontal track that is critical to playback. It is the sync track and it's purpose is provide the VCR with the feedback it requires to maintain the tape speed within extremely tight parameters. If the tape does not move at a precise speed, the picture and sound can become unstable to the point that it will be unusable.
As you record, a fixed frequency sine wave is recorded on the sync track. If during recording, the tape speed increases or decreases, it will be reflected on the sync track. During playback, the VCR's circuitry senses the small millisecond-to-millisecond speed fluctuations of the tape movement over the heads and adjusts the speed so the tape speed always matches the speed at which it was recorded. If the sync track is ever damaged, your tape can become useless.
Unfortunately, videotape is a very delicate media. It is easily damaged and once damaged, it usually cannot be repaired. The most common failure is due to tape stretch. Videotape is not very elastic. Anything more then slight tension during use can stretch the tape to the point that it cannot rebound. If the sync track is stretched, the recorded frequency will change and the VCR will react accordingly by making incorrect speed corrections resulting in picture and sound disruptions. Your recorder has tensioning arms that control tape tension as it moves through the system. If the tension in the tape path is incorrectly adjusted, the tape will be damaged as it is recorded or played.
Improper storage is the other common cause of edge damage. If you lay your cassettes flat for prolonged periods, the weight of the tape above will press against the sync track and can damage it. Always store your tapes vertically. Extremes in temperature and humidity can cause stretch. Store tapes in a cool dry place. Also, periodically restack your tapes. To restack a tape, put it in your recorder and fast-forward it to the end and back to the beginning. That will redistribute the tension on the tape. After playing a tape, always restack it once or twice. I have a large collection; over 1,000 tapes. I cannot restack them all on a regular basis. But when I play them, I take that as an opportunity to restack them.
Now that you understand some basics about the media, I will now turn you attention to your VCR. As I hope you are starting to understand, proper playback requires precise alignment of many moving elements. The two broad categories are tape path alignment and head alignment. None of this is a do it yourself job. In addition to specialized electronic test equipment, VCR alignment requires specialized tools along with expensive custom made for the brand and model alignment jigs along with (again expensive) alignment tapes. The alignment tape is important beyond the obvious. In order for a tape recorded on one machine to play properly on another, the two machines must have matching alignment. VCR manufacturers record their own alignment tapes using precisely and frequently aligned recorders. The tapes are used to align a specified number of VCRs and then discarded because each time a tape is used it wares. Since there is a uniform standard for these tapes, a tape recorded on one brand of VCR should play on another. That is the theory.
Now for the real world; the consistent interchangeability we all wish for is hard to maintain. Consider this. The tolerances that must be maintained at every point in all of the processes relative to VCRs and tapes are very close to what is possible; little room for slight variations. Since the tolerance for one part of the process may accumulate with another part of the process either mathematically positively or negatively, it is often the case that each individual part of the chain is within tolerance, but the sum total is out of tolerance.
What in plane language does this all mean? Two alignment tapes made on the same machine will be different. Tapes from different manufactures will be different. The tape you local technician or factory service center uses will have inconsistencies. The net effect is that two seemingly properly aligned machines may not be able to properly play each other's tapes.
I do not mean to suggest that you should not have your VCR properly aligned and maintained by a professional. My point is that videotape is an old technology with flaws that could not fully be overcome in the time frame that it would have been profitable for manufacturers to do so. That is why we have moved on to digital technologies. My advice is to enjoy your videotapes while you can. They will not last forever. If you have important tapes, transfer them to digital media to protect your memories as soon as possible.

on Jul 03, 2015 | Televison & Video

7 Answers

VCR playback issues


I had a similar issue with a DVD player, in that it wouldn't play any commercial or rental DVD's, but it would play them if I burned a copy on my laptop. Turned out to be board inside the machine. I had to replace it.

Jun 18, 2008 | Philips Magnavox DVD/VCR Dual Player

1 Answer

Music playing backwards


Well, not being there to try some diagnostics, there can be a number of reason that the tape plays backwards at times. One reason is that the tapes are 4 channel discrete tape requiring a 4 track 4 channel deck- this would mean track 2,4 are recorded in the forward direction. A Stereo (2 channel 4 track deck) play tracks 2,4 in the opposite direction. That is why you turn the tape over on some decks. Other possibilities could be tape path skew, that reverse relay is NOT changing the head that "listens: to the tape and that is just the start of what it could be. When a new person starts to use a deck of such age- it can be correct to assume that the deck is not working in some respect. A Tape deck Technician such as myself would know how to determine if the deck was working correct or not and know and have parts to correct it. I worked in the Factory Service in Chicago for Teac and actually have one coming into my shop in the near future. After 40 years of working on these I am still at it. I am sorry there may not be an easy answer to this.

Aug 01, 2012 | Teac Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

I have a Samsung camcorder and when I play mini dv tape recordings from Canon camera I recorded on , the sound is distorted


If the tape plays correctly in the Canon camcorder, here are a couple of possible reasons for the issues you are having:

1. the Samsung camcorder has a cleaning issue - try running a dry head cleaning tape for about 5 to 10 seconds and see if that helps.

2. The alignment is off between the two different camcorders. Nothing you personally can do about that, but a repair center would be able to correctly align the tape path on both camcorders.

Do the tapes that you record on the Samsung have issues when you play them back on the Samsung? If so, you have a problem with that camcorder (may be cleaning, but could be a mechanism problem) Hope this has helped you. www.austintelstarservices.com

Aug 30, 2010 | Samsung SC-D353 Mini DV Digital Camcorder

1 Answer

When playing a vhs tape the pics jump half way through watching. trying to record these old family tapes to dvd. is there a type of vcr i can buy to manually fix tracking or is there another way to solve...


There are two reasons that might cause loss of tracking halfway into a video tape. The first means you can't really do a lot about it. To check it is this is simple. When you get to the point the video jumps, stop the VCR and eject the tape. The look at the tape itself by lifting the flap at the front (push the small catch on the right side). Examine the section of the tape. If you see any damage to the tape (it should look smooth and shine) then it will never track properly.
Another cause of the jumping is caused by the take up reel, getting sluggish. Sometimes these are run off a belt, that becomes slack, replacing it could solve the problem, or it could be something else in the mechanism that's causing it.
There is another solution, particularly if the tape wasn't recorded on the machine that is playing it back. I haved used loads of different VCR's and I found that the tracking has never been set up right on any! This means that only the VCR it was recorded on generally gives the most correct playback.
Having said that it is possible to get a VCR with really good tracking. I have found that Panansonic VCR's have the best tracking. I currently have a NV-HS900 which can track just about everything, but you will only get one seconed-hand now.

Apr 07, 2010 | Televison & Video

1 Answer

Tape adjustment


Jazzie: Your pinch rollers are worn. Put in a new set and probably a drive belt while you're at it and you'll be back in business. When the rollers are worn and tapered, the tape just rolls right off. Be sure to get the Pioneer replacements! Part---- RXB-325

Oct 29, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

VHS Tape on Sanyo Doesn't play on other VCR's


the heads on the sanyo vcr may slightly be out of alignment from years of use.when playing a recorded tape from this vcr to another, the other vcr's alignment maybe right on track thus causing the poor quality.you can possibly try cleaning the heads with a head cleaner or a high grade blank tape,but i don't think this will solve the problem. but you can try.
good luck
wg
p.s also try higher quality tapes to record on.

Feb 04, 2008 | Sanyo VWM-900 VHS VCR

1 Answer

Vcr tape problem


It sounds like the tracking information is being lost for brief periods of time. Tracking is recorded at the lower edge of the tape, and if the tape is wrinkled or otherwise damaged in this area, playback will go out to lunch. A visual check of the tape would be in order. Have the heads been cleaned in these machines? This would be another area to check.... Also, there could be small differences in the tape path alignments, perhaps the control/audio head alignment is slightly different between the 2 machines.

Apr 28, 2007 | Panasonic AG-1980 S-VHS VCR

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