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I have recently received an email asking for my Amazon details or my account will be closed. I believe this is a Phishing attempt and would appreciate an email address to forward this request on. Than

I have looked for ways to make contact, ie, by telephone or email but unable to make contact other than by this means. Can you please help

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I have received 2 emails from Amazon that there is a problem with my online account. How can I verify these messages. The only thing I have ordered have been kindle e books.


Almost certainly a phishing email. If you go to the site, you should go the amazon.com domain and the url should start with httpS:// the S signifies a SECURE site and shows a green padlock, and the phishing ones aren't.

Best advice though is not to use the link, but go to Amazon yourself, log in and check your account Inbox.

Amazon ca Your Account

Mar 13, 2017 | Amazon Tablets & eReaders

Tip

Tips to avoid phishing


Phishing is one form of internet fraud wherein unscrupulous individuals extract personal information and use them for illegal transactions.

Here some sample of phishing.
In some selected trading websites, phishing is commonly done in order to swindle other members of the site. example of phishing sites area adult content websites. these sites area easy to create and they generate lots of internet traffic. this is the perfect place to get information. Former members our company (who has been banned) commit this type of offense. they are called "carders", people who use other people's information for their own benefit. to this day, there are countless number of carders in the world wide web as I know it, and this should serve as a warning to all.

Doesn't it make you wonder that a seller, who can sell items valued at less 100,000 at half the price?at close scrutiny, you will discover that person doesn't have own car, commutes to do meet ups and you can't fathom how they could afford such a luxury item. this is how carders operates and this has a lot to do with phishing they create fake websites and make it attractive to internet surfers.
Anyone who wants to buy the items displayed there will surely input their credit card details and other personal information which will then used to make fake credit cards. these fake cards will then be used to purchase merchandise from legitimate websites like Amazon.com, newegg, etc.
after 2-3 weeks after they received their items, you'll be surprised that your credit card statement will reflect purchases you did not make! this is a classic "phishing" technique.

Another form of information extraction is by establishing a fake company and asking for resumes online. We have received reports of incidents like this be careful about sharing personal information. even within the other known website "phishers" any personal information they collect will be used to open up fake credit card accounts which they determine the credit limit. these accounts will be used again to make purchases in your name without your knowledge.

Emails are also prone to phishing. phishers will create a fake Gmail or Yahoo which claims to have lost their database and needs you to re-enter your username and password. Do not fall prey to this sort of charade. the information they gather from you will be used to access your email accounts.

Tips to avoid Phishing.
1. Make sure a website is legitimate before giving away credit details and personal information.
2. Avoid submitting resumes or biodata when you doubt the legitimacy of an agency
3. If someone sends a private message asking for personal information, Do not give it unless you know the person.
4. Be careful when signing in to your email account. If you finish checking your emails, please sign out. Do not leave your account sign in, specially internet cafe shop.

I hope this information will be helpful.





on Aug 08, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I do not have account with Wells Fargo.. some one is using my e-mail address....


Margaret, it could be a spam/phishing email, meaning they are chancers. Check the email(don't click on any links within the email though) and check the sender. If it came from Wells Fargo, it should have the domain, "wellsfargo.com" in the senders address, if it doesn't, then it's more than likely a phishing email.

This link will give a bit more info on phishing. There's a lot of chancers out there.

Phishing Wikipedia the free encyclopedia

QUOTE: Phishing is the attempt to acquire sensitive information such as usernames, passwords, and credit card details (and sometimes, indirectly, money), often for malicious reasons, by masquerading as a trustworthy entity in an electronic communication.

If you think that you're email account has been compromised, change your password for the account.

Hope this helps, Nik.

If I have helped you, please click 'Helpful' below, thanks.

Aug 05, 2015 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I have just received an e-mail purporting to come from Amazon requesting my Account details or else it would cancel my Account. It came in as "spam" and I wish to know if this e-mail is genuinely from...


I would treat this as a phishing email, with the sender hoping you will respond and give away your account details.
You can always contact Amazon security as they would probably like to investigate these emails.

Feb 28, 2015 | Computers & Internet

3 Answers

A gmail 75imary@gmail.com Keeps appearing on my apple post site asking for my password. This is not my account. What should I do?


I am assuming you are getting this when you are signed into Gmail.
I found these help items:Someone changed your password
If you suspect that someone else knows or has changed your password, please reset it so nobody else can sign in to your account. To do so, just enter your username on thepassword-assistance page.
Account username:
  • For Google Accounts without Gmail: the full email address you used to create your account.
  • For Google Accounts with Gmail: everything before '@gmail.com'
If you think someone has access to the email address associated with your Google Account, please change the password for your email as well. Learn more about keeping your account secure.
If you're unable to reset your Google Account password, and you can't sign in to your account, you can fill out the account recovery form.
About phishing
A phishing website or message tries to trick you into revealing personal information by appearing to be from a legitimate source, such as a bank, social network, or even Google. If you receive a suspicious message, do not provide the information requested. We've included some tips to help you recognize phishing and keep your account secure.
Think before you click
Pay close attention to sign-in screens.
Cyber criminals can use links in emails, tweets, posts and online advertisements to direct you to fake sign-in screens, where they can steal your password. Only sign in to your account when you are certain you visited the real site directly. Check the Internet address to be sure.
How can I recognize phishing?
You should always be wary of any message that asks for your personal information or messages that refer you to a web page asking for personal information. If you receive this type of message, especially from a source claiming to be Google or Gmail, please don't provide the information requested. Google will never send unsolicited messages asking for your password or personal information, or messages containing executable attachments.
Messages or websites phishing for information might ask you to enter:
  • Usernames and passwords
  • Social Security numbers
  • Bank account numbers
  • PINs (Personal Identification Numbers)
  • Full credit card numbers
  • Your mother's maiden name
  • Your birthday
What should I do when I see a phishing scam?
Most importantly, never reply to suspicious emails, tweets, or posts with your personal or financial information. Also, don't fill out forms or sign-in screens that link from these messages.
Most email providers, including Gmail, allow you to report suspicious emails and phishing scams. To report phishing in Gmail, click the drop-down arrow next to "Reply" and select "Report phishing."
[img src="//storage.googleapis.com/support-kms-prod/SNP_C0876BD50D22A6760FDC123410FD347EAFA2_6080310_en_v1" height="auto"> [img src="//storage.googleapis.com/support-kms-prod/SNP_B23A0D3D855390A774846D7E98277B25AA7F_6080321_en_v0" width="450" height="auto">

Sep 28, 2014 | Apple MacBook Pro Laptop Computer with...

1 Answer

I simply want to stop receiving unsolicited emails from Amazon. Cannot identify where on this reply site I can effect this. Searching this site using 'Unsubcribe to emails' has not led me to a...


Identifying Amazon E-mailFrom time to time, you might receive e-mails that look like they come from Amazon.com, but they are, in fact, falsified. Often these e-mails direct you to a Web site that looks similar to the Amazon.com Web site, where you might be asked to provide account information such as your e-mail address and password combination. Unfortunately, these false Web sites can steal your sensitive information; later, this information may be used to commit fraud. Some phishing messages contain potential viruses or malware that can detect passwords or sensitive data. We recommend that you install an anti-virus program and keep it updated at all times.
Below are some key points to look for in order to identify these e-mails:
1. Know what Amazon.com won't ask for
Amazon.com will never ask you for the following information in an e-mail communication:

  • Your social security number or tax identification number
  • Your credit card number, PIN number, or credit card security code (including "updates" to any of the above)
  • ***********'s maiden name
  • Your Amazon.com password

2. Requests to verify or confirm your account information
Amazon.com will not ask you to verify or confirm your Amazon.com account information by clicking on a link from an e-mail.
3. Attachments on suspicious e-mails
Amazon.com does not send order confirmations or other unsolicited requests that require you to open attachments, nor do we permit our merchants to do so. We recommend that you do not open any e-mail attachments from suspicious or unknown sources. If you receive a suspicious e-mail allegedly sent from Amazon.com that contains an attachment, we recommend you forward the e-mail to stop-spoofing@amazon.com (as an attachment if possible) without opening it. Delete the mail after you send it. If you opened an attachment in the e-mail, we recommend running anti-virus or anti-malware software.
4. Grammatical or typographical errors
Be on the lookout for poor grammar or typographical errors. Some phishing e-mails are translated from other languages or are sent without being proofread, and as a result, contain bad grammar or typographical errors.
5. Check the return address
Is the e-mail from Amazon.com? While phishers often send forged e-mail to make it look like it came from Amazon.com, you can sometimes determine whether or not it's authentic by checking the return address. If the "from" line of the e-mail looks like "amazon-security@hotmail.com" or "amazon-fraud@msn.com," or contains the name of another Internet service provider, you can be sure it is a fraudulent e-mail.
6. Check the Web site address
Genuine Amazon.com web sites are always hosted on the "amazon.com" domain--"http://www.amazon.com/. . . " (or "https://www.amazon.com/. . ."). Sometimes the link included in spoofed e-mails looks like a genuine Amazon.com address. You can check where it actually points to by hovering your mouse over the link--the actual Web site where it points to will be shown in the status bar at the bottom of your browser window or as a pop-up.
We never use a web address such as "http://security-amazon.com/. . ." or an IP address (string of numbers) followed by directories such as "http://123.456.789.123/amazon.com/. . . ."
Alternately, sometimes the spoofed e-mail is set up such that if you click anywhere on the text you are taken to the fraudulent Web site. Amazon.com will never send an e-mail that does this. If you accidentally click on such an e-mail and go to a spoofed Web site, do not enter any information and just close that browser window.
7. If an e-mail looks suspicious, go directly to the Amazon.com Web site
When in doubt, do not click the link included in an e-mail. Just go directly to www.amazon.com and click "Your Account" in the top right menu to view recent purchases, or review your account information. If you cannot access your account, or if you see anything suspicious, let us know right away.
8. Do not "unsubscribe"
Never follow any instructions contained in a forged e-mail that claim to provide a method for "unsubscribing." Many spammers use these "unsubscribe" processes to create a list of valid, working e-mail addresses.
9. Protect your account information
If you did click through from a spoofed or suspicious e-mail and you entered your Amazon.com account information you should immediately update your Amazon.com password. You can do this through Your Account by choosing the option to "Change your name, e-mail address, or password" found under Account Settings.
Even if someone has been able to look at your account, they are still not able to see your full credit card information. However, orders can be sent from your account using your credit card so please contact us immediately if you notice any orders that you do not recognize.
However, if you did submit your credit card number to the site linked to from the forged e-mail message, we advise that you take steps to protect your information. You may wish to contact your credit card company, for example, to notify them of this matter. Finally, you should delete that credit card from your Amazon.com account to prevent anyone from improperly regaining access to your account. To do so, click "Edit or delete a credit card" under Payment Settings in Your Account.
How To Report Phishing E-mails or Request Account Assistance
If you have received an e-mail you know is a forgery, or if you think you have been a victim of a phishing attack and you are concerned about your Amazon.com account, please let us know right away:
Report or Contact Us about a Phishing or Spoofed E-mail

More than you might want but how about a ++++ rating?

Sep 25, 2011 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

Email asking for account details


This is 100% scam and we should aware of this type of emails. Usually they include links like "click here to verify your account" etc.. and in most cases, this email isn't text format but image format where they insert hyperlink and as soon as click on the area of the mail, you'll be directed to another phishing site with the similar website like paypal (only the appearance,) if so open it, but don't enter any information and check the web address on the address bar, you'll see something like http://wwww.paypal.com (4 w's) or www1.paypal.com (3w's with 1), etc..

Just ignore it and forward or send this email to paypal directly to their Scam Alert email spoof@paypal.com

This has been circulating for some time now, so we need to be aware of this, they can easily copy your paypal's password and username/email address as soon as you attempt to login. There more with this, at your first attempt, you'll get an error message that your username or password is incorrect, at that time they've already captured your login account info and have been directed to the original paypal website. If you don't believe, use wrong/random email address and password, click login and see what happens.

This is What We Call Phishing.


Good luck

Thanks for using FixYa.

Jul 14, 2010 | PayPal Accounts

1 Answer

YAHOO HAS BEEN HARRASSING ME AND THREATENING TO CLOSE MY ACCOUNT FOR OVER A YEAR.KEEP ASKING FOR ME TO EMAIL MY INFO TO THEM,HOW DO I KNOW IF ITS A SCAM?THE EMAILS HAVE FULL YAHOO HEADERS AND COME FROM THE...


Hi,

It seems you are receiving phishing emails (which ask for your password details) so that unauthorised persons can gain access to your Yahoo Account.

Yahoo never asks you for your password or personal information in an unsolicited phone call or email message.

For more details and how to report such emails to Yahoo, click here

Thanks for using FixYa

Jul 06, 2010 | Yahoo Mail

1 Answer

Received an email supposedly from paypal. Am trying to establish authenticity. Email states that my account access has been limited because they believe that my account was accessed by a third party. Case...


I'd suggest logging into www.paypal.com and going to the Help / Contact Us section there. The email is 'probably' a hoax, but you can not be sure. DO NOT click any links in the email itself. Type the PayPal.com link into your browser to avoid a 'phishing' attempt. Hope this helps.

Feb 20, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I received an email asking me to verify my yahoo information, including my password. I emailed Yahoo support over a week ago but have received no response. The original email was poorly written. Is it...


NO Yahoo do not ask for your pesonal details via emails It is likely a phishing email that will use your information to steal your identity. Yahoo suggests you log in online, NEVER from a link in an email if there is any question about your account. Change your password immediatly.Or delete that account and raise a new one

Please rate our help++++Thanks for using FIXYA

Oct 08, 2009 | Yahoo Mail

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