Question about Poulan Garden

1 Answer

How to test ignition module on poulan 5200

I ohm tested everything the module reads .345 everthing else was .003

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Genius:

    An expert who has answered 1,000 questions.

  • Poulan Master
  • 2,485 Answers

If it has no spark when you pull it over fit a new one.

Posted on Nov 20, 2014

5 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 4088 Answers

SOURCE: what is the gap for the ignition module on a

A thin business card is just right for setting the gap. Turn the magnets to be under the module poles, loosen the module screws and allow it to stick to the magnets. Tighten the screws, rotate the magnets away and remove the card. If the module is good it should make a snappy blue spark with a new plug. If rotating the flywheel through one revolution causes any core rubbing, the crankshaft may be bent or the flywheel may not be fully seated on the crank shaft. Don't run the engine until this problem is repaired. Hope this helps!

Posted on May 10, 2010

dontbother10
  • 2220 Answers

SOURCE: HOW TO TEST IGNITION COIL ON A POULAN CHAIN SAW

Ignition Coil Test by SmallEng.com
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L7WNBDRG4C4
You may need to use a jumper wire between the threaded part of the plug and the cooling fins. You do not have to bend up the electrode.

Ignition module gap
Place a business or index card between the fly wheel and coil, rotate until the magnetic attraction pulls everything tight together. Tighten the coil screws, rotate the flywheel until the attraction eases and remove the card. Ensure nothing contacts when the flywheel is rotated.


If you have more questions or need additional help please reply below and I will get back to you. HTH & Good Luck.
Lou
Thank You for using FixYa.

Posted on May 12, 2010

  • 6468 Answers

SOURCE: how do i adjust the module-ignition on poulan pro chain saw model #PP4218AVWhat's your problem?

are you talking about the magneto to the flywheel gap i just use a piece of paper between the two and tighten it

Posted on Apr 08, 2012

  • 2239 Answers

SOURCE: how to test ignition module

There are plenty of spark testers on the market, if you want a quick check remove the spark plug, use a new plug with twice the plug gap 0.6mm earth against the cylinder ( away from the opem plug hole ) crank the engine at normal starting speed, if there is a spark the unit is probably fine.

Posted on Nov 25, 2012

Testimonial: "I unhooked the on/off switch first not mentioned in your answere. Then followed your instructions. Beautiful blue spark. With on/off switch hooked up no spark. I think we found the problem. (on/off switch)"

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Can I use an ohm meter to test the ignition module on 545081826 what results should I gett


Some say yes, I say no. An ohm meter just isn't an accurate way to check any coil. Get a simple spark checker and check for spark.

Apr 25, 2014 | Poulan Replacement Ignition Module Pou...

Tip

How to test a motrcycle twin ignition coil


To test a twin ignition coil on a motorcycle you will need a pocket multimeter.
With the meter set to kilo-ohms(1000 ohms) scale,place one test lead into one spark plug cap & the other test lead into the other plug cap.(this is called the ignition coil secondary resistance) The reading should be around 20-40kilo ohms.
If a high reading exists check again with spark plug caps removed(they un screw from the lead) then check caps seperate. Caps typically read 5 to 10 kilo-ohms.

A faulty plug cap is not as un-common as you might think.

To test ignition coil primary resistance set the meter to ohms(lowest scale) Place one meter test lead to the small wire going into the coil & the other test lead onto the coils body(where its metal) The reading should be only 2 to 5 ohms.

on Jul 15, 2010 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

Winshield wiper delay intermitent module making noises


The wiper delay is in the steering column. It's a small box about 2 x 2 inches with a wiring harness attached. With the testing procedures I found below, you should be able to figure it out. I found wiper delays on eBay for around $10 to $20. Good luck.

WINDSHIELD WIPERS CHEROKEE, COMANCHE & WAGONEER 1. POWER INPUT Remove circuit breaker. Test battery side of circuit breaker. If battery voltage is not present, repair open to splice. Test across circuit breaker terminals. Tester reading should be zero (0) ohms. If not, replace circuit breaker. 2. GROUND Connector A unplugged. Test terminal G. Tester reading should be zero (0) ohms. If not, repair open to ground. 3. INTERMITTENT WIPERS Ignition switch in ACCY. Remove delay module and plug connectors together from the module. If wiper operate in LO and HI speed modes and mist (washer) is working, if wipers and mist operate, replace intermittent module. If not go to step 4. 4. WIPER/WASHER SWITCH Ignition in RUN, wiper switch position as indicated, back probe switch side of connector A for standard, connector B for intermittent: Test connector terminal E-wiper switch in LO and mist/intermittent. If battery voltage is not present, replace switch. test connector terminal C-wiper switch in HI. If battery voltage is not present, replace switch. Test connector terminal F-wiper switch to OFF. If battery voltage is present until wipers stop and then voltage drops to zero (0), system is working fine. If this does not occur, replace switch. 5. INTERMITTENT WIPERS Connector B unplug. Test across terminal A and D while rotating switch from minimum to maximum delay. If tester reading is not between 0-500 ohms, replace switch. Test across terminal A and G while rotating switch from minimum delay to maximum delay. If tester reading is between 0 and 500 ohms, replace wiper module. If not replace switch. 6. WIPER MOTOR Ignition in ACCY, wiper switch position as indicated, probe connector D. Test connector terminal 1. If resistance is no zero (0) ohms,repair open to ground. Test connector terminal 4-wiper switch in any position. If battery voltage is present, replace motor. if is not repair open from fuse panel. Test connector terminal 2-wiper switch in LO. If battery voltage is present, replace motor. If not , repair open from wiper switch. Test connector terminal 2-wiper switch in HI. If battery voltage is present, replace motor. If not , repair open from wiper switch. Test connector terminal 5-wiper switch OFF with voltmeter connected. If battery voltage is present until wipers stop and then voltage drops to zero, system is OK, replace motor. If not, repair open from wiper switch.

62217_jeep1_1.jpg


62217_jeep2_1.jpg

Found on the web. I hope this helps.
Rich Long

Jan 26, 2014 | Jeep Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Cylinder 1 is not firing


Instructions1 Use a wiring diagram for the year model of your vehicle. Locate the terminals running into and out of the ignition module. Placement of the module varies from model to model so check the appropiate service manual of your vehicle for the exact location.
2 Turn the ignition on and use your DVOM to check for voltage to the ignition module and the positive terminal of the ignition coil. Place the negative lead of your DVOM to a solid ground and use the positive lead to probe the wires running to the ignition module and to the ignition coil.
3 If your DVOM shows that voltage is present at both locations, remove the DVOM leads and set the meter aside. Connect the ground lead from the 12-volt test light to the negative terminal on the ignition coil. Have your partner crank the engine over several times. Your test light should flicker on and off. If so, your module is working properly and no further testing is necessary.
4 If your test light does not flicker on and off, visually inspect the wires running into and out of the ignition module. Look for burn marks, melted wire insulation and breaks in the wires. Use your wire splicing tool to remove the bad area in the wire and use your wire connectors and splicing tool to repair the faulty wires.
5 Use your DVOM to check for an open circuit condition in the primary coil winding. Touch the negative probe to the negative terminal on the ignition coil, touch the positive lead to the positive terminal. Set the meter to read ohms. If the reading shows infinite ohms, your ignition module is faulty and should be replaced. Follow the service manual instructions for replacing your ignition coil.
6 Look to see if the DVOM test shows low to no ohms; if so, then you have a faulty ignition module that will have to be replaced. Follow the service manual instructions for your vehicle to replace the module.
Thanks

Apr 02, 2012 | 1994 Mitsubishi Galant

2 Answers

Got fuel to the throttle body but still wont fire,


There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.
The same principal applies to HEI (High Energy Ignition) ignition systems with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap.

45ca149.jpg

da6d91b.jpg

Sep 21, 2010 | 1988 Chevrolet K1500

1 Answer

What would cause my car to not send spark to the spark plugs


The first thing is do you know when the last time was that the distributor cap, ignition rotor, and spark plug wires were changed?

There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That could be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Let me know if you require a firing order diagram any further assistance with testing or diagnostic procedures.




42d2a26.jpg

c88274e.jpg

Jul 29, 2010 | 1995 Chevrolet Blazer

1 Answer

I have an 88 Chevy Cheyenne 4.3 V6 with a throttle body. It is acting like gas is not getting into the jets. I checked the fuel filter, fuses, relays, wiring to the jets, and still can't find the...


If the fuel pump does run and there is fuel pressure but there is no fuel injector pulse to the fuel injectors at the top of the throttle body, then the problem is either with the distributor, the ECM, or the wiring between the ignition module inside of the distributor and the ECM.

There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

819ba82.jpg

c2762d7.jpg

Jul 13, 2010 | Chevrolet C1500 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

My 89 s10 will not start for days on end no matter what i do. then out of no where it will fire right up. any suggestions? fuel relay is new and so is fuel pump.


There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil. A faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Jul 06, 2010 | 1989 Chevrolet S-10 Blazer

1 Answer

Hello i have a 1989 sunbird 2 liter engine,i changed plugs,wires,cap,rotor button,fuel pump and fuel filter,it idles great but if you drive it for maybe 30kms and come to a stop sign it will stall...


There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil. A faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Jun 25, 2010 | 1989 Pontiac Sunbird

Not finding what you are looking for?
Garden Logo

Related Topics:

65 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Poulan Garden Experts

Doctor PC
Doctor PC

Level 3 Expert

7733 Answers

Roland W VanLue
Roland W VanLue

Level 3 Expert

486 Answers

Phil Walker
Phil Walker

Level 3 Expert

605 Answers

Are you a Poulan Garden Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...