Question about Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

How do i connect my sansui se8 eq to my kenwood receiver

I dont get any sound when i connect my sansui se8 equalizer to my kenwood receiver

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Habit-Forming:

    Visited the website for 3 consecutive days.

    Greenhorn:

    A rookie expert who has answered 20 questions on their first day.

  • Expert
  • 166 Answers

How many input /output does the eq have ?

Posted on Nov 12, 2014

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: How do I connect a

Dear driver800,
Don't you just love it when when someone who knows less than you do tries to answer your question? Why is it people who know little waste everyone's time with suggestions like "read the book"
On the back of your Marantz MR-235 you will find the RCA phono jacks marked Tape 1 Monitor Output these connect to the jacks labeled input on your EQ 140. The corresponding jacks labeled Tape 1 Monitor Input connect to the jacks labeled output on the EQ 140.
QED
Russ

Posted on Dec 02, 2009

  • 128 Answers

SOURCE: I have a Yamaha HTR-5890 receiver and I am trying

must have the tape monitor to work the regular tape loop does not physically go back into the receivers processor.

only other solution is if the receiver has PRE out and ins use the PRE out to the EQ then back into the PRE in.

if you have the OUT but no in then the solution would be to go out of the EQ and into an external amp.

In my experience "young adults" like using EQ's to boast bass output.

If that's your goal a POWERED subwoofer is what you need.(check out polk audio direct on ebay)

Your unit is a 7.1 surround receiver the reason that it doesn't have the capability for an EQ is that it messes up the surround sound processor.

If the sound is not what you are looking for the issue more than likely is with the speakers. post a messege with what you want to achieve and I'll try to point you in the right direction.

Posted on Dec 29, 2009

dunnbiker
  • 8546 Answers

SOURCE: how to install a audiosouse equalizer (eq 100)

Actually, you have several tape loops: CDR/Tape, VCR1 and VCR2. The bottom right part of Page 7 in the manual shows how to connect a Tape Deck (or any in/out processor).

Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.

I have a whole array of 2-channel analog processing electronics looped out of one Tape Loop on my AVR - via a dbx 400x Program Route Selector - for making tapes or CD-R Audio recordings and otherwise modifying the analog sound for various purposes.

Posted on Aug 12, 2010

dunnbiker
  • 8546 Answers

SOURCE: can connect kenwood equalizer ke-205 to a surround

Yes BUT...

The following is some boilerplate I made up that should explain some usage limitations.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.


Okay, back to the hook-up:


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Rec, Line-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Play , Line-Out.


So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer

Posted on Feb 05, 2011

dunnbiker
  • 8546 Answers

SOURCE: would I be able to

Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose some form of STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? The rest would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Posted on Apr 16, 2011

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

How to hook up a 7 band pioneer equalizer great 470 to a Kenwood kr-v6030 receiver


Connecting an Equalizer to a Receiver Before beginning, purchase RCA cables. In order to run the signal from a stereo receiver to the graphic equalizer and then on to the amplifier, two sets of RCA cables are needed. These are basic cables used to connect auxiliary components like record players and CD players. The length of the RCA cables should be about the same length as the distance between the receiver and equalizer.

1. Connect Graphic the Equalizer to the Receiver

The first step in this setup is to connect the graphic equalizer (EQ) to the receiver. Most receivers will have preamp-in and preamp-out connections. Some have tape monitor connections. It's preferable to connect the EQ to the preamp-in or preamp-out because the tape monitor won't allow for connection to the amplifier as well.

2. Connect the RCA Cables

The first set of RCA cables should connect the receiver and equalizer. Connect one pair to the preamp output channels and the other end to the left and right input channels on the EQ. These are on the back side of the equalizer. Usually, the colors will correspond to the RCA plugs. That means connect the red plug to the red jack and the white plug to the white jack. Then connect the second pair of RCA cables between the receiver and the amp. Match the colors in the same way.

3. Connect the Amp to the Receiver

Now the amp can be connected to the receiver via RCA cables in the amp inputs on the receiver. This will create a loop from the receiver through the EQ and amp and back to the receiver so that all three units are connected.

4. Test Graphic Equalizer

Turn on the receiver, amp and equalizer. Once they are powered up, try controlling the sound with the equalizer knobs. They should fine tune the music according to your preferences. It's easy to change the frequency response or tone of the music with the equalizer knobs.

May 09, 2016 | Pioneer Audio Players & Recorders

2 Answers

Bose 901 equilizer connections to sansui G901DB


It sounds like you may have only the 901 loudspeakers, and not also the companion 901 equalizer box. You must install the 901 equalizer properly--using the tape monitor loop of the G901 receiver. If you of not, the 901 loudspeakers will perform poorly.

Jun 17, 2014 | Bose 901 VI Main / Stereo Speaker

1 Answer

Hook up kenwood ge-1100


2 stereo rca cables tape out to line in on eq, line out from eq to tape in on receiver. press tape monitor button to use eq, turn off tape monitor for direct. some receivers also have a dedicated I/o for eq, you just need to remove the jumpers and install in that loop (out to in on eq out from eq to in on rcvr}

Mar 16, 2014 | Kenwood Ge 1100 Graphic Equalizer

1 Answer

How to connect kenwood GE 52 graphic equalizer to my sony str-DE345 any idea , please help me.thanks.I tried many combination but didnt work.


An EQ usually plugged between a preamp and an amplifier. You have a receiver. There's no connections that will let you do that. The only thing you can do is between a source(ie: CD) and the receiver. The CD will go in the eq and out of eq to cd input on the receiver

Sep 03, 2010 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Como conectar un ecualizador Technics SH-E51 a un amplificador Kenwood KA300


How do I connect my equalizer to my receiver?
There are two methods of connecting an equalizer, by either using the tape monitor or the main pre-in & output jacks. To connect through the Tape loop, connect the EQ L&R outputs to the Tape-in (play) jacks of the receiver, then take the EQ L&R inputs to the Tape-Out (REC) of the receiver. On the front of the receiver you will need to select the Tape Monitor to access the equalizer.To connect through main pre-out/ pre-in jacks, connect the EQ L&R outputs to the receiver main-in inputs (pre-in), then connect the EQ L&R inputs to the main out (pre-out)

Oct 05, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Gemini Sound Products EQ-3000 equalizer


please connect as the following-----1-mp3 out-----to cd in in your receiver.
2-receiver rec out (tape put)----to equalizer in.
3-equalizer out----to tape in in receiver.

Sep 17, 2008 | Gemini Sound Products EQ-300 Home...

3 Answers

Clarion eqs746


more info would be nice...

what did you hook it up to?


Mar 23, 2008 | Clarion EQS746 Equalizer - 7-Band In-Dash...

2 Answers

CONNECTING


you can do it passive. no idea with your ampli, but if it does have a bridge then you can hook your eq there, series. if it doesn't have then via tape monitor 2 of your kenwood.

onkyo recvr tape 2 record to - kenwood eq in
onyo recvr tape 2 playback - kenwood eq out

that's all. if you want your eq to be active, then switch your reciever to tape2, all selected input in your reciever will by pass through your eq then back to kenwood. you dont have a function for tape 2 input then but your eq will have an extra input for tape, that you can use for your second tape, it will be active only if your reciever is set to tape 2. i hope you got it right.

post back if you got it done
red

Feb 10, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

VR-206 - how to wire in equalizer


your vr-206 have several inputs dvd, vcr, tape decks, turn tables etc, also have an opcion called eq in and out usually if you dont have an equalizer al you do is jump straight rca to rca cables red in to red out and white in to white out.
but if you have an eq all you do is output from amp vr-206 to input and the input to output back to the amp

Dec 22, 2007 | Kenwood VR-209 Receiver

Not finding what you are looking for?
Audio Players & Recorders Logo

Related Topics:

98 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Audio Players & Recorders Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

 Grubhead
Grubhead

Level 3 Expert

5011 Answers

The Knight
The Knight

Level 3 Expert

73619 Answers

Are you an Audio Player and Recorder Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...