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A yanaha mpv5 piano gets power but no sound - Yamaha Music

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If its displayonf data, the amp section is shorted and the ic needs replacement.

Posted on Aug 26, 2016

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What one? Keyboard or Piano?


That would depend on what you want to use it for. Assuming you mean a real piano, it's not portable, it can't be used with headphones for silent practice, and it will need periodic tuning and general maintenence. However, no electronic device is actually going to sound like a real piano, and no action feels the same as a real piano. Keyboards, on the other hand, can be played in different locations, have a larger variety of sounds, and are cheaper to maintain. As a pro musician, I own both. Actually a number of different keyboards, but only one piano

Jun 28, 2016 | Electric Music

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QS8 keyboard. Why is volume in organ mode much louder than piano mode when I switch between modes without touching volume slide?


On organ mode, in general, almost all brands of the modern keyboard, velocity setting is not enabled. Setting velocity is used to determine how much the level of the sound that follows how strongly you press the keys. It is really just to imitate the sound of vintage organs, which in the past, electronic organ technologi not use the velocity on the keys. So, how strong / slow we press the keys, the sound level will remain the same.
At the Piano mode,modern keyboard using setting velocity. This also to imitate an acoustic piano, which, if we press the keys slowly, the sound level will be slow as well, and vice versa.
So, in your case,at the same volume slider, try to play on the organ modes, note level. Moving to the piano mode and press the keys securely powered (full power). Then the sound level should be equal to the organ mode.
On modern keyboards, also included organ sound that added velocity setting. Usually found on the user bank.

Sep 01, 2015 | Alesis Music

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What is the estimated value of a milton upright piano serial number 51839


Milton Piano
From http://antiquepianoshop.com/online-museum/milton/ :
The Milton Piano Company was established in New York in 1892. In the early 20th Century they offered a full line of uprights, player pianos, and grand pianos, and they enjoyed a reputation of building very well made instruments. In the mid 1920s, Milton built a coveted new state-of-the-art factory on West 51st Street, New York City. There is some evidence that Brambach and Milton were somehow affiliated with one another, and their factories were located within blocks of each other. The Milton Piano Company built pianos until the late 1950s era.
From http://bluebookofpianos.com/agesm.htm#MILTON :
This name is a familiar one to the magical world generally. Milton pianos have been manufactured for many years and always with the care that produces most satisfactory results. The modern factories in which the Milton piano is produced are new, large structures located at 626-630 West 51st St., New York City. Milton pianos and player-pianos are thoroughly well-made, beautiful instruments, designed for a class of discriminating music lovers. They possess a tone at once powerful and sweet. They are pianos in which purchasers are assured good values and they are pianos that give exceptional satisfaction. Milton reproducing pianos are equally representative and popular.
All of which is great, but:
Be aware when dealing with antique pianos:
Many of the old (say, 1850 to 1940) pianos were made by companies that are no longer in business (failed, or bought out by a competitor), or companies that built the instrument under another name.
Pianos back then were not really mass-produced, they were hand crafted- and each manufacturer made their piano very differently, so:
Short Version: there will be parts that will work on only that *one* model of piano, so getting parts will be difficult if not impossible.
Long Version: Musical instrument craftsmen (craftspersons?) love to innovate, for a variety of reasons: they may find a new way, for instance, to connect the key to the hammer that strikes the corresponding note. It might be a better way to do it, or, more often, it was to come up with a cheaper way to do it.
The point I'm making is that your Struz Brothers piano will have parts that are totally different from, say, a piano made by either Krakauer Brothers, Doll, Jacob & Sons, or Mathushek & Son Piano Company (companies that started around the same time as Sturz Brothers). The parts may vary from one year to the next, or even one model to another.
So, if your Sturz Brothers piano needs a key replaced, or the harp has bent under pressure, the soundboard is cracked, or any number of things that can plague an old instrument, you'll need to either
A) find someone that is willing to sell parts from a similar model (if they're parting it out, it has more problems than yours does), OR
B) you'll need to have the part manufactured from scratch by craftsmen that specialize is rejuvenating old pianos. This will be expensive far, far beyond what the piano is worth- and these craftsmen live very well, BTW...
Last Caveat: Upright models sell for much less (and the term "Upright Grand" was just an advertising phrase, there is no such animal.) Uprights (spinets particularly) sound very... tinny, is the best description I can think of. Tinny like the toy piano your granma gave you when you were five- remember, the black keys were painted on? Tinny like that.
So, unless the piano is a Steinway & Sons, a B?sendorfer, or a Fazioli, don't count on huge offers for your instrument. And if it came to you from your great-aunt Tilly and you can't bear to part with it, that's great, I understand sentimental value. Just know that this will cost a great deal to bring to playing condition.
I'm often told "But the keys all work, the pedals are still tight, and the tuner told me that it's not a bad piano!" All this is true. But please remember that professional buyers know all of these potential pitfalls won't offer much, and the guy on Craigslist that needs to replace the piano for Great-Aunt Tilly can't afford much.
Good luck!

Dec 13, 2014 | Music

1 Answer

I have baby grand electronic Viscount piano. Power is on with lighted screen but no sound when hit keystroke


Can you activate various other controls?? If so, it sounds like your output amp section might be at fault....Does it have a headphone jack?? If so do it work?? And would really need the exact model number......

Nov 16, 2014 | Music

1 Answer

Tell me some tips and tricks about using the Kurzweil sp3x stage piano


The place to get the best help for Kurzweil gear is Sweetwater Sound.
Other than that, always use it in stereo mode with a decent sound system. Always use speakers with at least a 15" woofer and a horn to get the full range of sound it's capable of.

May 18, 2014 | Kurzweil Music Systems Kurzweil SP3X...

1 Answer

Need repairs on Technics SX-PX103-M Model.


Have you had any luck with your Technics piano? I've got the same piano and Mine does not work either. No lights on the control panel, only red power light comes on. Does yours have any led lights besides the power light that come on? I've investigated and I have learned a lot from this piano. 4 main boards. Im pretty sure I've got it down to one board. Interested in selling me any boards from your Piano??

Jan 19, 2012 | Music

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I have just bought a PRX612M. When I play my digital piano through it at low volume there is a buzz which is most noticable as the notes volume dies down. Loud it sounds great but i would love to know what...


1000 Watts? Well, those are peak values. !000 watts RMS into a 12 inch speaker and it would smoke... this is some of our inflated advertising. But that is beside rhe point... now on to your problem: What you are having is a ground loop. You may have to do more than one thing to correct this here is the things to do in the order to do them to solve the problem:

1. Connect the piano and the speaker to the SAME power source or receptacle, even if you have to run an extension cord, three wire of course. Plug all of this ONLY into a grounded outlet, if your house has only two wire plugs, then you need to get an electrician to install a grounded receptacle.

2. Use Balanced lines. This means XLR or TRS balanced cables between the piano and the speaker. Use the 1/4 inch jacks output, not the RCA ones.

3. Since the AUX outputs do not support balanced lines, the next step require you use DI box. They are about $20 from Guitar Center and others. With very short 1/4 inch mono cable connect the piano to the DI box from the L/R mono piano to the high impedance input port of the DI and set the ground lift switch to "LIFT". Use an XLR to XLR cable from the DI box to the speaker. This last step if needed is the last thing in our bag of tricks to break the ground loop that can cause the buzz. Dirty power, if you have lamp dimmers can be a source of the noise.

Apr 06, 2011 | JBL PRX612M 12 Inch Two Way Self Powered...

1 Answer

I cannot get the grand piano sound......help somebody!


You are not clear if you can't select it or it just doesn't sound like a grand piano. If it is the latter here are the things to check:

1. Are your speakers at least 15 inch diameter with suitable tweeter as well? This is if you want the deep lows of the piano. Twelve inch are minimum size to sound anything like a grand. The internal speakers found in the pianos just don't quite make it as they are often only 4 to 6 inch.

2. Is your amplifier capable of enough power?

To get the REAL GOOD grand sound you need a capable audio system. A home stereo system just doesn't cut it to reproduce the sound of a grand piano.

Mar 09, 2011 | Kurzweil SP2XS Keyboard Home

1 Answer

Yamaha Portable piano - Loud 50Hz sound only on mains


MAKE IT THIS WAY FRIEND, IF YOUR POWER INPUT IS OK, AND THE OUTPUT IS FINE, THEN GO FORWARD FOR THE NEXT STEP, IF YOUR LA4558, (2CHANNEL AUDIO OUTPUT IC) IS HEATING UP, THEN JUST CHANGE THE IC, ALSO CHECK FOR CAPACITORS, ANY SIGNAL DIODES IF HAD DAMAGED, AND RESISTORS NEARBY...CHANGE THE AUDIO AMP

Oct 16, 2009 | Music

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