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MAC OS 10.4 Shared Folder problem

We're running MAC OS 10.4 in our office. We have a shared folder and testing why when another user on the network types in the file name, the file is not coming up. Any ideas??

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The user has to connect to the mac on which the folder is shared, only after that can the user access the file. I t would be helpful if you could tell me the os type of the other machine.

Posted on Jul 03, 2009

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How do I Scan from a C2020?


In regards to scanning from a Canon ImageRunner to a Mac, this used to be done via SMB. But then Apple modernized the SMB protocol in Lion & Mountain Lion & Mavericks, and Canon decided to remain in the dark ages with their old-fashioned SMB protocol support. So therefore, Canon ImageRunners are now incompatible with Lion (OS X 10.7) & Mountain Lion (OS X 10.8) & Mavericks (OS X 10.9) & Yosemite (OS X 10.10) & El Capitan (OS X 10.11) for scanning via SMB.
The solution is that we now have to use the FTP protocol for scanning, when scanning from a Canon ImageRunner to a Mac running Lion (OS X 10.7) or Mountain Lion (OS X 10.8) or Mavericks (OS X 10.9) or Yosemite (OS X 10.10) or El Capitan (OS X 10.11).
To use the FTP protocol, you first need to enable it on your Mac by going into the Terminal and typing this command:
sudo -s launchctl load -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/ftp.plist
After enabling FTP via the Terminal, go into the Sharing system preference. Enable File Sharing in the left margin. Add the shared folder where you want the scans to end up. We usually like to create a folder on the Desktop entitled "Canon Scans", so you can just drag this folder into the list of folders. Click on the "Options" button to make sure that AFP is enabled, but you do NOT need to enable SMB.
Now you can go into the Network system preference where you will need to manually assign a static IP address for your machine. The Canon ImageRunner will need this static IP address so that it can find your Mac.
Once you've done all of the above, you can now create a new "one touch entry" on the Canon ImageRunner printer to scan to the shared folder on the Mac.
To do this, click on the physical button on the copier that says "Additional Functions", then press "Address Book Settings".
Then, on the Canon ImageRunner screen, press "One Touch Buttons".
On the next screen, press an existing name to edit it, or press a numbered button to edit a new name. (You can scroll through the pages with the arrows on the right.) You must press the "Register/Edit" button to add or edit that button.
If you're adding a new button, then on the next screen, you'll have to press "File".
Then you'll be taken to the next screen. The information to type in is the following:
Name: Give the button a name
One-touch Button Name: Give the button a short name that will fit on a button.
Protocol: FTP
Host Name: The static IP address that you assigned to the Mac. Do NOT use any special characters or slashes... just enter the IP address.
Folder Path: shared folder name. The trick to this is that you have to give the path from the starting point of the home folder. So if the shared folder is named "Canon Scans" and it sits on the desktop, then type in this file path: "Desktop/Canon Scans" (without the quotes).
User: the full account name of the account which owns the shared folder.
Password: the password for the account which owns the shared folder.
And that's it! You are now all set to scan from your Canon ImageRunner to your Mac!
I hope you enjoyed this article. If so, please donate a small amount via Paypal so that I can continue to post blog articles in the future.

Jul 15, 2014 | Canon for IMAGERUNNER C2020 C2050 C2058...

Tip

Sharing Your Own Computer's Stuff with the Network


To share a file or folder with your fellow computer users, move the file into your Shared Documents folder, which lives in your My Computer window. (You must move or copy a file into the Shared Documents folder; shortcuts don't always work.)

After you place your file or folder into your Shared Documents folder, it appears in the Shared Documents folder of everybody else using your computer.

Administrators can share folders without having to move them into the Shared Documents folder. The trick is to follow these steps:

1. Right-click on a folder you'd like to share and choose Sharing and Security from the pop-up menu.

Open My Computer and right-click on the folder you'd like to share. When the menu appears, select Sharing and Security. A window appears, showing the Properties for that folder. It opens to the Sharing tab.

Right-click on a folder and choose Sharing and Security to share the folder on the network.

2. Click the box marked Share This Folder on the Network.

A check mark in that box lets everybody peek at, grab, steal, change, or delete any of the files in that folder. To let visitors look inside the files but not change them, remove the check mark from the box marked Allow Network Users to Change My Files.

3. Click OK.

Now that particular folder and all its contents are available for everybody on the network to share.

Sharing a lot of folders isn't a good idea because it gives network visitors too much control over your computer. Even if you trust people, they might accidentally mess something up. To be safe, only share files by placing them in the Shared Document folder.

Inside Shared Documents live two more folders, Shared Music and Shared Pictures. Those two folders are also available to any user. So, if you want to share documents with any user of your computer, store them in the Shared Documents folder. When you make MP3s from your CDs, store them in the Shared Music folder, too, so that everybody can enjoy them.

on Dec 01, 2009 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Folders missing from mail app


A shared folder is a folder that can be viewed, edited and shared with all users on a single computer or on a shared network on various computers.

Because shared folders are used by various users, someone can accidentally delete or remove the folders from their original locations.

A shared folder can also be altered if unauthorized changes have been made to the folder's structure, resulting in corrupt folder files.

Shared folders can easily be restored in a few simple clicks.
Click on the Windows "Start" button.


Click on the "All Programs" link.
Scroll to find the "Accessories" folder and click on it.


Click on the "System Tools" folder.
Click on the "System Restore" icon.


Click on the "Restore my Computer" option.
Enter the date from where the restoration will begin.

Anything deleted, broken or missing from this date will be restored during the process.
Try to recall when the shared folder was last seen or used by someone and select this date as your start date.

Choose the current date as your end date.
Click "Next" to start the restoration process.

Depending on the time period chosen, this process can take anywhere from a few seconds to several minutes.


Check the folder or drive where the shared folder was located prior to disappearing. The shared folder has now been restored.

Mar 24, 2014 | Dell Inspiron Computers & Internet

1 Answer

How to use comupter as sever


Proxy server
Use a Computer as a Proxy Server
Small networks can still take advantage of a proxy server.
The Microsoft Windows operating system allows you to turn your computer into a proxy server.
A proxy server is a central computer on the network connected to the Internet.
Other computers on the network use the machine to connect to the Internet.
The Internet Connection Sharing (ICS) configurations on the machine allow you to turn your computer into a proxy server.

Click the Windows "Start" button and select "Control Panel."
Double-click "Network and Internet Connections."
Double-click "Network Connections" to view a list of network card settings.
Right-click your network card icon and select "Properties."
For most users, this icon is labeled "Local Network."
Click the "Advanced" tab.

Check the box named "Allow other network users to connect through this computer's Internet connection" in the section labeled "Internet Connection Sharing."
A warning message pops up telling you that your IP is reset for the proxy computer.
Click "OK."

Reboot your computer for the settings to take effect.
You also need to reboot each client machine on the network to ensure they see the proxy server.
Turn a Computer Into a Server
When you have more than several computers and users who want to share files and resources, whether in your home or in a small office, you can convert a computer into a server.
Building a server out of a computer will allow users to access files whichever computer they use to access them.
An example of the resources that can be shared is a printer and shared folders such as photos and documents. Here's how to convert a computer into a server.

Prepare your computer.
Clean up the computer with unnecessary files to save on space.
If your computer is really old, install the latest operating software so that it is compatible with the rest of the computers that will share its resources.
For this example, we are installing Windows XP.
Check the hard drive space or capacity if you have enough.
You can do away with 256MB sized old computer, but you may want to think about adding more disk space for future needs.
You can easily buy extra internal or external hard drives to bump up your disk space to a capacity that you would desire.
Try purchasing a 10GB extra disk drive then insert it in computer or connect via a serial port or USB hub it if it is external drive.
To install the hard drive driver on XP, let the hardware wizard run you through the options.
You can install the driver with the installation CD software that your hard drive came with.
Follow the options during installation. ,


Check your computer if the network card (ethernet card) is functioning properly. if it does not, you would need to install a NIC or Network Interface Card.
Some old computers have 10 megabit cards, but if you want to have high network performance and better connectivity through your LAN (Local Area Network) then you would need to upgrade your NIC by installing a 100 megabit or 10 gigabit NIC.
Install your network card driver using the installation CD that came with it then follow the installation wizard.

Get a network router. Connect this router to your high speed connection.
The most common ones to use are Netgear, Linksys or DLink routers.
Choose a wireless router so that if you have wireless users they can connect easily (plus this will save you on trying to connect cables to the router all over the place).
Set up your network connections.
Click on "Start," "Control Panel and "Network and Internet Connections."
Pick a task from the options listed or pick a control panel icon, in this case "Network Connections."
If you are set up to pick up the IP Address of your computer automatically, one you have installed your NIC in Step 4 and rebooted, it will pick up the connections automatically whether plugs in using a LAN or network cable or using wireless card.

Rename your computer. Name it so that it can easily be identifiable in your network.
You can either name it simply "SERVER" to be easily recognized, but it is all up to you how you want to name your server.
To name your server if you are using Windows XP, you can right-click on "My Computer" then click on "Properties."
Go to "Computer Name" tab then click on "Change."
Other Windows operating systems or versions would have this feature located somewhere else. Read the owner's manual that your computer came with it.

Create a shared folder by going to "My Computer" and "C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Documents."
Create a new folder by right-clicking on the screen, then click on "New Folder."
Name the new folder "Shared Files" or anything that can easily be identifiable.
Take note that on Windows XP, any folder that you create and then dragged into the "Shared Documents" folder will be automatically shared by everyone.
You can restrict certain folders by dragging the folder out of the "Shared Documents" folder, then right-clicking on the file folder, clicking on "Properties," then the "Sharing" tab and finally "Make this Folder Private."
Create a shared resource by adding a printer or fax to use. Go to "Start."
Click on "Printers and Faxes" and "Add a Printer," then let the installation wizard that came with the printer or fax guide you.
Name your printer or fax (for example, "Shared Printer").
Then once the printer is installed, set it up so that you can share it by right-clicking on the "Shared Printer," then on "Properties," "Sharing" tab and finally on "Share this printer."
Connect any computer to your server.
Go to each computer and ensure they are connected on the same router.
Then go to "Start" and "Run," type in "EXPLORER," then on the menu click on "Tools" and "Map Network Drive."
A window will pop open where you will assign a "Drive" letter and a "Folder."
Choose any driver letter, for example "G" to denote "Group" drive or "S" to denote "Shared Drive," then type in the IP address of the server.
To do this, go to the server, then go to "Start" and "Run," type in "CMD" then type in "IPCONFIG." This will display your server's IP address.
Type the IP address on the "Folder" field on the computer.
You can also try if the computer will automatically find it by choosing the drive letter then clicking on the "Browse" button on the "Folder" field.
Start using the shared resources by going to the drive letter that has been assigned on your computer.



Sep 24, 2013 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I own microsoft office 2007 how can I download it onto my new hp mini110 which has no cd slot


"I have a netbook with no optical drive. How can I install Microsoft Office? A friend says I have to either buy Office as a download from Microsoft or get an illegal download - don't like either of those options. " Charles C from Iowa among many have asked this question.
There are several options for installing software onto a computer with no CD / DVD drive. We'll focus on Microsoft Office (as usual) but the same techniques can be used for almost any programs.
All these suggestion boil down to a simple truth - you can copy the contents of the Microsoft Office install disk to a folder which can be accessed from the netbook.
We have plenty of other netbooks on Office tips in our feature: Using Office on Netbook computers. Like this article, our feature was written on a netbook computer, so the advice is from hard personal experience.
Install disks are NOT that special There was a time when install disks were specially made so you could not copy them easily but those disks are rare these days. The installation files for Microsoft Office can be copied just like other files.
What really matters is the Product Key that's supplied with your purchase - it's that 25 character key which allows Microsoft Office to work normally. See What happens if your product key is stolen?
USB memory stick The easiest option is to copy the entire contents of the install CD to a USB memory stick or portable drive then plug that 'key' into the netbook.
Make a folder on the USB drive called, for example, Office 2007 Standard install.
Then copy the whole CD/DVD (sub-folders and all) with the root folder of the install disk copied to the new folder on the USB drive.
904-office%20install%20disk%20copied%20to%20folder%20on%20removable%20drive.jpg
Office install disk copied to folder on removable drive
When you plug the USB drive into the netbook, navigate to the install folder (ie what was the root folder of the original CD/DVD).
Double-click the setup program or right-click autorun and choose Install. This will start the install process just as it would from the CD/DVD.
Share a CD/DVD drive On a Windows network, any drive can be shared and 'seen' across the network by other authorized computers.
Go to the desktop computer, right-click on the CD/DVD drive and select Sharing (the exact menu wording depends on your version of Windows) then share the drive with appropriate permissions.
On the netbook computer, go to the Network option on the Start menu. Navigate to the desktop computer then the shared CD/DVD drive. You can then see the contents of the install disk, click on setup or autorun (as above) and the installation will begin.
Apple promoted a 'special' remote CD feature when they released the Macbook Air. It was hailed in many quarters as a wonderful innovation, despite the fact that Windows users have been able to do the same thing for years.
Copy to netbook across the network If setting up the CD/DVD as a network share doesn't suit, you can simply copy the install disk contents to a new folder on a desktop hard drive which is shared and accessible from the netbook.
On a Vista desktop machine the easiest option is copying to one of the 'Public' folders then make sure those folders are shared with the local network. The netbook computer can 'see' that shared folder on the desktop machine and you can install from there.
Alternatively, copy from the desktop CD/DVD to the netbook computer. Make some folders on the netbook shared with write permissions then open Explorer on the desktop computer navigate to the shared folders on the netbook. Copy the contents of the install CD/DVD from the desktop computer to the shared folder on the netbook. Install from the netbook folder.
Plug in a CD/DVD drive There are plenty of cheap USB CD/DVD drives available which you can buy to plug into your netbook. However, as you can see, there is usually no need because you can access an optical drive from a desktop computer via the local network.
Repairing Office In the olden days (ie a decade ago) if Microsoft Office had problems you'd have to dig out the install CD and reinstall.
For the last few versions of Office (Office 2007 and Office 2003 at least) that's rarely necessary. When Office is installed a copy of the key installation files is put in a hidden folder - if (when) Microsoft Office has a little nervy an auto-repair system should start and restore files from the source. Re-using the install disk is less common these days.

Article posted: Wednesday, 27 May 2009

Jun 17, 2011 | HP Computers & Internet

1 Answer

How to network connect and activate windows 2007 & MAC X


Set up user accounts

Users connecting to Windows Sharing must have user accounts on the Mac OS X computer that is sharing. There is no guest access. Any person who already has an account on the Mac OS X computer can use his existing account. You must log in to the Mac OS X computer with an administrator account to set this up. The steps differ for new and existing users.

For new users
  1. From the Apple menu, choose System Preferences.
  2. From the View menu, choose Accounts.
  3. Click New User (10.2) or the "+" button (10.3 or later).
  4. Enter the Name and Short Name for the user who will log in from Windows.

    The user's short name is exactly how the user will enter their name when they log in to Windows Sharing. The short name is always lowercase.

    For users of Windows 98: If you log in to Windows 98 with a username, make sure it matches your Mac OS X account's short name. If you do not log in to Windows 98 with a username, you will need to create a new Windows 98 username that matches the account short name in Mac OS X. For more information on using Windows operating systems, please see Microsoft documentation or contact Microsoft for further assistance.
  5. Enter the user's password.
  6. 10.2 only: Click the checkbox for "Allow user to log in from Windows".
  7. 10.2 only: Click OK.
  8. Quit System Preferences.

If your Windows PC has is equipped with an Ethernet port, you can connect your PC and Macintosh using an Ethernet cable. By doing this, you are creating a small local network, consisting of just the two computers. Set up your Windows PC by turning on File Sharing. Refer to the instructions that came with your Windows PC if you're not sure how to do this.

To locate and connect to the Windows computer, you can use the sidebar in a Finder window. You need to know the workgroup name for the computer and the network name (called the "computer name") for the computer. To connect to the computer, you also need a user name and password and the name of the shared folder you want to access. If you don't have this information, contact the person who owns the computer or your network administrator.

If you cannot locate the Windows computer in the Network browser, you may be able to connect to it using the Connect To Server dialog in the Finder.

Make sure the Internet Connection Firewall is turned off, or if it's on make sure TCP port 445 is open to allow sharing connections.
To connect you Mac and Windows computers: step_1.gif

In the Finder, choose Go > "Connect to Server."
step_2.gif

Type the network address for the computer in the Server Address text box using one of these formats:

smb://DNSname/sharename smb://IPaddress/sharename
step_3.gif

Follow the onscreen instructions to type the workgroup name and a user name and password, and choose the shared folder you want to access.

Feb 23, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

How can i set up network file sharing


First step is to check if the file sharing option is checked in my computer folder options.

Start- My computer- TOOLS - FOLDER OPTIONS- and click on the second tab VIEW- scroll down to the last option which will show as USE SIMPLE FILE SHARING.

Level 1: My Documents (Private) loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); The owner of the file or folder has read and write permission to the file or folder. Nobody else may read or write to the folder or the files in it. All subfolders that are contained in a folder that is marked as private remain private unless you change the parent folder permissions.

If you are a Computer Administrator and create a user password for your account by using the User Accounts Control Panel tool, you are prompted to make your files and folder private.

Note The option to make a folder private (Level 1) is available only to a user account in its own My Documents folder.

To configure a folder and all the files in it to Level 1, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security.
  2. Select the Make this Folder Private check box, and then click OK.
Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • System: Full Control
Network Share Permissions:
  • Not Shared
Level 2 (Default): My Documents (Default) loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); The owner of the file or folder and local Computer Administrators have read and write permission to the file or folder. Nobody else may read or write to the folder or the files in it. This is the default setting for all the folders and files in each user's My Documents folder.

To configure a folder and all the files in it to Level 2, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security.
  2. Make sure that both the Make this Folder Private and the Share this folder on the network check boxes are cleared, and then click OK.
Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • Administrators: Full Control
  • System: Full Control
Network Share Permissions:
  • Not Shared
Level 3: Files in shared documents available to local users loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); Files are shared with users who log on to the computer locally. Local Computer Administrators can read, write, and delete the files in the Shared Documents folder. Restricted Users can only read the files in the Shared Documents folder. In Windows XP Professional, Power Users may also read, write, or delete any files in the Shared Documents Folder. The Power Users group is available only in Windows XP Professional. Remote users cannot access folders or files at Level 3. To allow remote users to access files, you must share them out on the network (Level 4 or 5).

To configure a file or a folder and all the files in it to Level 3, start Microsoft Windows Explorer, and then copy or move the file or folder to the Shared Documents folder under My Computer.

Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • Administrators: Full Control
  • Power Users: Change
  • Restricted Users: Read
  • System: Full Control
Network Share Permissions:
  • Not Shared
Level 4: Shared on the Network (Read-Only) loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); Files are shared for everyone to read on the network. All local users, including the Guest account, can read the files. But they cannot modify the contents. Any user can read and change your files.

To configure a folder and all the files in it to Level 4, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security.
  2. Click to select the Share this folder on the network check box
  3. Click to clear the Allow network users to change my files check box, and then click OK.
Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • Administrators: Full Control
  • System: Full Control
  • Everyone: Read
Network Share Permissions:
  • Everyone: Read
Level 5: Shared on the network (Read and Write) loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); This level is the most available and least secure access level. Any user (local or remote) can read, write, change, or delete a file in a folder shared at this access level. We recommend that this level be used only for a closed network that has a firewall configured. All local users including the Guest account can also read and modify the files.

To configure a folder and all the files in it to Level 5, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security
  2. Click to select the Share this folder on the network check box, and then click OK.
Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • Administrators: Full Control
  • System: Full Control
  • Everyone: Change
Network Share Permissions:
  • Everyone: Full Control
Note All NTFS permissions that refer to Everyone include the Guest account.

All the levels that this article describes are mutually exclusive. Private folders (Level 1) cannot be shared unless they are no longer private. Shared folders (Level 4 and 5) cannot be made private until they are unshared.

If you create a folder in the Shared Documents folder (Level 3), share it on the network, and then allow network users to change your files (Level 5), the permissions for Level 5 are effective for the folder, the files in that folder, and the subfolders. The other files and folders in the Shared Documents folder remain configured at Level 3.

Jul 20, 2010 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

1 Answer

Making a shared folder


Go to this site http://fhctech.org/fhc/networking/xp-sharing-folder.htm for winxp or
http://kb.iu.edu/data/ahrs.html For win2000

http://www.maximumpcguides.com/share-a-folder-in-windows-vista/ for vista

Hope this helps if not please specify the Operating system of your computer

Sep 17, 2008 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

File sharing


it is possible

If you have multiple computers in your home and they are connected through a home network, you can share files among your computers. That means you no longer have to copy files to a floppy disk or USB flash drive to transfer them to another computer. Once you configure your computer to share files, you (or another user with the appropriate permissions) can, by using Windows Explorer, open them from other computers connected to the network, just like you’d open files that are stored on a single computer. You can also choose to have folders visible—but not modifiable—from other computers on the network.
To share files on your computer with other computers on a network, you need to:
Share a folder on your computer. This will make all of the files in the folder available to all the computers on your network (you can’t share individual files).
Set up user accounts on your computer for everyone who needs to connect to your shared folder. If any of the accounts are Limited User accounts (unless an account is a Computer Administrator account, it is a Limited User account), follow the steps in Set permissions for files and folders to enable them to open your files.

To access shared files that are on another computer on your network, you need to:
• Connect to the shared folder from other computers on the network. This procedure is described in Map a network drive.

Note: By default, file permissions only allow your user account and administrators on your local computer to open your files, regardless of whether a person is sitting at your keyboard or at another computer. It may help to keep these three things in mind when setting up file sharing:
• Files have user permission settings.
• Every computer has its own user database.
• Some accounts are administrator accounts and some aren’t.

Configure your computer to share files To share a folder on your computer so that files stored in the folder can be accessed from other computers on your home network
1.
Log on to your computer as an administrator. For more information, see Access the administrator account from the Welcome screen.
2.
Click Start, and then click My Documents.
68599-click-my-documents.gif 3.
Right-click the folder that you want to share, and then click Sharing and Security.
68599-click-sharing-and-security.gificotip.gif Tip: If you want to share your entire My Documents folder, open My Documents, and then click the Up button on the toolbar. You can then select the My Documents folder.
4.
If you see a message that reads, As a security measure, Windows has disabled remote access to this computer, click the Network Setup Wizard link. Then follow the instructions in How to set up your computer for home networking. On the File and printer sharing page of the Network Setup Wizard, be sure to select Turn on file and printer sharing. If you do not see this message, skip this step and go to step 5.
68599-click-network-setup-wizard.gif Note: If you do not see the Network Setup Wizard link or the Share this folder on the network check box, your computer probably has Simple File Sharing disabled. This is a common change made to computers used for business. In fact, it happens automatically when a computer joins an Active Directory domain. You should follow these instructions to share a folder instead.
5.
In the Properties dialog box, select the Share this folder on the network check box.
68599-click-share-this-folder.gif 6.
If you want to be able to edit your files from any computer on your network (instead of just being able to open them without saving any changes), select the Allow network users to change my files check box.
68599-click-allow-network-users-to-change-my-files.gif 7.
Click OK.
68599-click-ok.gif Windows Explorer will show a hand holding the folder icon, indicating that the folder is now shared.
To connect to the shared folder from another computer, follow the steps described in How to map a network drive.
Note: By default, only you and other people with an administrator account on the computer sharing the folder will be able to open your files. To limit access of specific users with an administrator account on the computer sharing the folder, read How to set permissions for files and folders.

Aug 14, 2008 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional

1 Answer

Too many connections win xp


In Windows XP Professional the maximum is 10, but you can set this to a lower value. You can use the Shared Folders snap-in to determine the maximum number of users that are permitted to access a folder. In the Shared Folders details pane, click the shared folder for which you want to determine the maximum number of concurrent users who can access the folder. On the Action menu, click Properties, displaying the Properties dialog box for the shared folder. The General tab shows you the user limit. Remember Win SP the maximus is 10. You can also use the Shared Folders snap-in to determine if the max numberof users that are permitted to access a folder has be reached.

Determine the number of connections to the share and the max connections allowed. If the max number of connections has already been made, the user cannot connect to the shared resource.

Jun 14, 2008 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional

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