Question about Opteka HD² for Nikon D80, D70s, D70, D50, D40x, D40, D200, D100 (SLD-NIKON)

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Camera doesn't focus very well on dark subjects.

I have a Nikon D100 and have been photographing models against a white background. It works okay unless they are wearing black or dark blue clothing when the images are usually out of focus or blurred. In the few photos where the dress has been in focus, the models face is not.

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I think you have 2 problems at one time.
1 - I notice that your depth of field is very narrow, (your aperature is quite open) which hardly can focus the spot you want. try to increase the f/number like f/4 or above. the models face and there clothes toward your nikon D100 is almost the same distance, so they should be in the same focus range, but as I said witch big aperatures like f/2.8 of f/1.4 every inch count when it becames to focus.
2 - Set your camera in Single-focus (not Continous focus) en focus on the models face. then press halfway en keep it pressed. then you can compose a new position (still pressed halfway) and when the composition is good, then press it further to capture the photo.

Posted on Jul 08, 2009

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PICTURES ARE BLACK


6 Ways To Fix Too Bright and Too Dark Photos

Recompose The Photo This is probably the simplest solution. When taking a photo of a scene with very bright and very dark parts, move your camera to eliminate one of the extremes. In the case of the band, I would have either closed the curtains for the shot, or recomposed completely and photographed from the window looking at the band, and the crowd behind.
Use Exposure Lock If you can't recompose the photograph, instead tell the camera what part of the image you would like to see. The rest of the photo will be either over or under exposed (too bright or too dark) but at least you will see your subject. You can dothis by placing the center of the image at your subject; half depressing the shutter to lock the focus and exposure; move the camera to re-compose the image; and fully depressing the shutter.
In the band image, the camera chose to correctly expose the scene outside, but even if the band member had been correctly exposed, the window would have ended up being over exposed and you would just have seen white.
Some cameras have an option called 'spot metering' to set the part of the image you'd like to be correctly exposed. If your camera has this setting, enable it before using the technique above.
Use Fill In Flash If your scene has a sunny background, but your subject is in the shade (or has a hat on), turn on the flash (as I explained way back in tip number 9 - Using Flash During The Day). I know it seems wrong but it really does work! By using the flash, your subject will look as bright as the background. This would have worked well for the child shot above.
High Dynamic Range Imaging This technique is not for the faintof hearted. It requires a subject that does not move; a good camera with the capability to set the exposure and output RAW images. A tripod and image editing software like Photoshop CS3 are also needed.
High Dynamic Range Imaging (or HDR for short) is a technique for placing both very dark and very light areas in the same photo. It requires you to take a number of photographs of thesame scene - each with a different exposure. First take the shot using the camera's recommended settings. Then, in manual mode and keeping the aperture at the same value as the first shot, take a sequence of shots - each shot having a different shutter speed (above and below the original). You'll have 5-9 shots of the same scene all in different exposures.
hdrunder.jpghdrmean.jpghdrover.jpg
Merging the three images to the left creates the HDR image below. Thanks to Photomatix for the images.
hdrmerged.jpgNow import these into your favorite paint program. I use Photoshop, but you can as easily use a cheaper program designed specifically for HDR photos like Photomatix. Follow the HDR directions and the paint program will merge these images into one great looking shot!
Use a Filter If your scene is of a brightsky and a dark ground (for instance at sunset, or on a cloudy day), you can use a graduated neutral density filter. This filter cuts out someof the light from one part of the photo (the sky). This will correctly expose the ground and the sky without needing to use HDR. These filterscan be complex to setup, so I don't usually recommend them for beginners.
Fix The Original Photo in an Image Editing Program twobright2.jpgFinally, if you can't take another shot at the same location, you can fix the original image by changing the levels using a paint program. This works best when your subject is darker than the rest of the photo (because cameras lose detail in over-bright areas). I've brightened the band member in the top image using this technique and while it looks okay in thissmall shot, this technique can tend to amplify any noise in the image. The darker the subject, the harder time you will have fixing the image.
I discuss exactly how to use this technique in lesson 2 of my free Image Editing Secrets course. I have a tutorial for Photoshop, Photoshop Elements, Paint Shop Pro and the free Google Picassa.
- See more at: http://www.digital-photo-secrets.com/tip/140/6-ways-to-fix-too-bright-and-too-dark-photos/#sthash.58eENOTt.dpuf

Jul 09, 2014 | Nikon D3000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Some of my pictures are blurry using a cannon rebel 3. how can i fix this problem?


There are several possible causes for blurry pictures.
1) Camera motion. If everything is blurry, it's most likely because the camera moved while the picture was being taken. Make sure your shutter speed is fast enough if you're handholding the camera (longer lenses require faster shutter speed). Alternatively, put your camera on a stable surface, such as a tripod or a tabletop.
2) Subject motion. If the subject is blurry but the background is sharper, then the subject may have moved while the picture was being taken. Use a faster shutter speed. Raise the ISO if needed. There are limits, of course. If you're trying to photograph a fast-moving object in the dark, you probably won't be able to.
3) Improper focus. If the subject is blurry but something else in the picture is sharp, then the camera probably focused on the wrong object. Move the focus selector to the subject you want in focus. Alternatively, center the viewfinder on the subject, press the shutter button halfway to lock focus, then reframe and shoot.
Without any more specific information as to what and how your pictures are blurry, I'm afraid the above is all I can give you.

Jan 13, 2012 | Canon Cameras

2 Answers

Focus On My Subject


Change your metering mode to spot metering. Focus on your subject with half-press of shutter button...hold that press while you re-compose the picture and press the rest of the way. See if you get better results.

Apr 07, 2010 | Nikon D200 Body Only Digital Camera

1 Answer

Well i was wondering how i could get a bokeh effect behind a subject? does anyone know? is it possible to do this without a filter?


hello! Yes, you can since the Coolpix L100 has a 15X telephoto lens, you can use the second method described below.
Bokeh is a photographic term used to describe a lens effect wherein the background of the photo is out of focus. This effect is used to blur out distracting backgrounds and give emphasis to the the primary subject of the photo.There are two ways to get bokeh when taking pictures. The first is by using a very large aperture to get a shallow depth of field. You can set your camera’s aperture to f/5 or below. This will effectively throw everything behind your subject out of focus. You can also blur out the background of your photo by using a long telephoto lens. There is no hard rule on how long your lens should be but the longer its reach, the more pronounced the bokeh is going to be.

Dec 25, 2009 | Nikon COOLPIX L100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

When using my d80 (no matter what lens is on it) it just keeps trying to focus and will not take the picture. It was fine on Sun and then Tue wham!! I can not think of doing anything to it and no one has...


Be sure the lens is firmly switched to M/A. For some reason the camera is not acquiring a subject to focus on. Have you tried a simple subject with lots of contrast, like a black something against a white background. Cameras have a tough time whenever there is too little contrast or nothing specific to focus on.

Sep 23, 2009 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm...

2 Answers

Appears in focus in viewfinder, but isn't


Change your focusing setting to spot focus. Then, focus on your main subject, keep the button half-way pressed while you re-compose the shot and then press it the rest of the way. Does that improve the shot?

Sep 21, 2009 | Nikon D100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

When viewing photos that have been taken, And any photo that has any shade of white flashes black


This is an indication from the camera of "burn out". You have lost all detail in this region of the frame due to the high light levels and the sensor is seeing pure white. This may happen outdoors or when taking a dark subject against a bright background.

Jul 28, 2009 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm...

1 Answer

Low light no focus


The Nikon D100 custom settings option 22 - AF Assist, controls the AF Assist light.
Check if this has been turned off.

This option controls whether the auto-focus assist light comes on in low light to help autofocus
latch onto the subject.

Jul 15, 2009 | Nikon D100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

SHOOTING ON A NIKON D80


1. Use Dynamic Focus. It enables you to track the animal if it is moving.

2. Focus on the animal's eyes. If the eyes are in focus, it will make the photograph.

3. I suggest spot metering with quick animals. It may wash out the background but you will get the shot of your 'prey'.

4. If the animal is stationary, stick between f8 - 11.

5. As far as possible, shoot just after dawn and before sunset. You get good light that way.

6. Try to frame the animal against the sky or some other light colour if the animal is dark or against a dark background (or the sky again) if the animal is light.

7. Switch off the beep sounds of the camera.

8. A good sturdy tripod.

9. Patience. Oodles of it.

10. I stay in Africa (for the time being) and enjoy photography. I usually go by these maxims. I hope they work for you.

Satdeep

Apr 23, 2008 | Nikon D80 Body Only Digital Camera

1 Answer

Strange silhouetting and a vertical strip


If A vertical strip appears on the screen when recording a dark background or the subject is blooming or silhouetting, you need to adjust the BLC. * The contrast between the subject and the background is too great for the camcorder to operate normally. * Make the background brighter to reduce the contrast or use the BLC function while you are recording in a brighter environment. BLC (Back light Compensation) * BLC works in CAMERA/M.REC mode.B * Back lighting exists when the subject is darker than the background: 1. The subject is in front of a window. 2. The person to be recorded is wearing white or shiny clothes and is placed against a bright background; the person?s face is too dark to distinguish his/her features. 3. The subject is outdoors and the background is overcast. 4. The light sources are too bright. 5. The subject is against a snowy background. 1. Set the power switch to CAMERA mode. 2. Press the BLC button. Normal - BLC - Normal BLC enhances the subject. Notes: * When NITE PIX to set to ON, the BLC function does not work. * The BLC function will not operate in EASY mode.

Sep 07, 2005 | Samsung DouCam VP-D5000i Mini DV Digital...

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