Question about AudioControl KVT-911DVD Car Video Player

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Need wire pin outs for the 8 pin power connector on KVT-911DVD

If I'm looking from the back side of the connector where the wires come out, and have the tab oriented to the top, I see 2 rows of 4. On the top row right now, I have empty, empty, orange, empty. On the bottom row, I have empty, empty, green, empty. Still need red, black, and yellow positions.

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1 Answer

970A-G46 AM3+ ATX AMD Motherboard


You're trying to use a proprietary part on a different computer.

The plug connector you have was made for a 8(?) contact pin plug connector. (Usually 1 pin is missing, for a 'Key' pin)

The Front Panel header on the mobo you're trying to use it on, has a 10-pin Front Panel header. (Again, 1 pin missing for a Key pin)

You need to separate those individual connectors.
Yeah, I know.

This involves trying to slice/saw them out, and there's Nothing dangerous about that! (Sarcasm)

Moving on............

The connectors in that female plug are female metal terminal connectors. Individual connectors. Example,

http://www.mcmelectronics.com/product/28-9420&utm_medium=Affiliate&ref=cj&utm_campaign=CommissionJunction&utm_source=CommissionJunction

The opening in the front, of course goes over the contact pin, in the Front Panel header on the motherboard.
The back of the connector, shown at the top; is crimped around the insulation of the wire.

The barrel shaped connector slides down into the individual socket hole, in the plug connector.

Looking at the Molex connector, observe the two 'Tangs' that stick out on either side. -> /

When the Molex connector is inserted into the plug connector's socket hole, the Tangs press against the sides of the connector.
When the Molex connector is at the correct depth, in the plug connector socket hole, the Tangs 'pop' out.

They pop out in small depressions, in the sides of the socket hole.
See how they angle towards the back?

If you slide the correct diameter of needle, down in the Front of the plug connector, (And in socket hole), you can depress one tang at a time.

Slides into the socket hole, right next to the Molex connector, and pushes down on the Tang.

Once depressed by the needle, lift up on THAT side a little.
Keeps the tang in a correct position.
Then insert the needle on the other side, and depress that Tang.
You can now remove wire and connector.

Takes a little practice on the first one. Second one goes a little faster, then you're on your way. Just sounds difficult explained so detailed.

With the individual wires, and their connectors; you can plug each wire in where you want. Connect to the contact pin in the Front Panel header, that you wish.

Trying to cut that connector apart, and leave individual amounts of plug for insulation; may prove unfruitful.
Most of the time the material in-between two of those Molex connectors, is very thin.

Maybe one connector will come away with enough material, maybe not. Most will not.

Also you risk slicing your fingers.

Or you could find a plug connector that fits that group of 7-pins, and transpose the wires over to it.

The front of your computer is the Front Panel.
The area of contact pins on the motherboard, that the Main wires connect to, is the Front Panel header.

Main wires being;
Power On switch wires
Power On LED light wires
HarDDrive activity LED light wires
Reset switch wires, IF used

Since you have the manual, out of curiosity are pins 2 and 4 Power On LED?
1 and 3 are HarDDrive activity LED?
5 and 7 are Reset switch?

For additional questions please post back in Comment.
Regards,
joecoolvette

Feb 23, 2013 | MSI Computers & Internet

1 Answer

What is the sqare chuck , wires two black and two white wires on the motherboard ?


Boy, ya got me.

If it was a small square opaque white socket on the motherboard, that a power cable from the Power Supply; had two YELLOW wires, and two Black wires, and plugged into it, I would know what it is,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

As technology for personal computers advanced, hardware components needed more power.
The motherboard wasn't able to deliver the power needed, so the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable, was brought out.

More power was needed later.
Hardware components demanded more power, than a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable could deliver.

So the 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable was brought out,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#eps8

It CONNECTS to the motherboard. (For motherboards that use one)
NOT to be confused with the 8-pin PCI Express power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress8

This power cable plugs into a GRAPHICS CARD, not the motherboard. Note the color code of the wires.

For a PCI Express expansion slot on the motherboard, for a graphics card; the best the PCI Express slot can deliver is 75 Watts.

The 6-pin PCI Express power cable was brought out next,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress

It is plugged into the graphics card too, and can deliver up to an additional 75 Watts.
Now there is 150 Watts available for the graphics card.

Computer technology advanced, and the 6-pin PCI Express power cable, couldn't deliver the power needed.

Now comes the 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable by itself, can deliver up to an additional 150 Watts.

Now there is 225 Watts available for a graphics card.
75 Watts from the motherboard, 150 Watts from the 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.

Color code of wires;
1) Orange = 3.3 Volts
2) Red = 5 Volts
3) Yellow = 12 Volts
ALL are DC Voltage

(Two flashlight batteries produce 3 Volts DC)

4) Black wires are Ground wires. Also are known as Negative wires.


This motherboard happen to have a manufacturer name, and Model Number?

Can't find it?
How about the computer manufacturer name, and model number, it came out of?

The model number for a desktop computer, is on the back of the computer, next to the Windows product key; or up on the side of the computer tower.

(The plastic front of a desktop computer is the Front Panel.
Some older computers had a Door in the Front Panel.
The door is opened, and you look inside -> Down, for the model number)

Post back in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html

Feb 08, 2013 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Widetech the max psu update, now black screen on monitor


Kind of hard to give you a cable diagram, Roslyn, when you haven't stated what motherboard manufacturer and model number.

Or computer manufacturer and model number.
(Back of computer next to Windows product key; or up on side of computer tower )

So we'll wing it..............

Widetech the Max. A modular line of Power Supplies.

1) Main power cable;
It will be either a 20-pin ATX main power cable, or a 24-pin ATX main power cable.

The WTM (Widetech the Max) will have a braided thick cable, that will have a 20-pin connector, and a 4-pin connector.
Looks like this,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20plus4

The 20-pin connector, and the 4-pin connector, should have a white arrow on the side. The arrows point to each other, when the two connectors are properly aligned with each other.

So, ATX main power cable plugs into Power Supply, (If removable), and 20 + 4-pin connector plugs into motherboard.

When the hooked end of the Lock, on the side of the power cable's connector; is over the Tab on the motherboard connector; the power cable is deemed to be plugged in properly, and tightly.

Note*
Orange wires are 3.3 Volts
Red wires are 5 Volts
Yellow wires are 12 Volts.
Black wires are Ground wires. (Also are Negative)

Note that the extra 4-pin power cable, that attaches with the 20-pin ATX power cable; has TWO Yellow wires, a Red wire, and a Black wire.
This way you don't accidentally somehow, plug the following power cable, in with the 20-pin ATX main power cable,


2) 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable:

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

When Processors started using more power, than just the processor socket (Motherboard) could deliver, this power cable was brought out to help carry the load.

Note*
TWO Yellow 12 volt wires, and TWO Black ground wires.

3) 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable:

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#eps8

Brought out for motherboards supporting multiple Processors, (CPU's), such as a server computer; but with processors needing more, and more power; is used quite frequently by motherboard manufacturers now.

NOTICE the power wires. The color code of the insulation of the wires.
FOUR Yellow wires (12 Volt), and FOUR Black wires. (Ground)
NOT to be mixed up with the following power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress8

This baby plugs into a GRAPHICS CARD (Video Card. Same/same)
A PCI Express graphics card, IF it uses one.

The PCI-Express x16 slot on the motherboard, is only capable of delivering 75 Watts.
This power cable can deliver UP TO an additional 150 Watts.

It is an upgrade of this power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress

The 6-pin PCI Express power cable was brought out, to provide more power for a graphics card.

75 Watts.

So now you have the PCI-Express x16 slot on the motherboard capable of 75 Watts, and the 6-pin PCI Express power cable capable of 75 Watts; for a total of 150 Watts available for a graphics card.

PCI-Express x16 slot on motherboard, and 8-pin PCI Express power cable?

225 Watts.

This power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#eps4plus4

Is for a motherboard that uses a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable, OR an 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.
Is a combined power cable if needed, just like the 20 + 4-pin ATX main power cable.

This power cable is a SATA power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#sata

Used to plug into a Harddrive, or Optical Drive. (CD/DVD drive)

NOTE*
IF your SATA harddrive has a provision on the back; to plug in EITHER a SATA power cable, AND a 4-pin Peripheral power cable; ONLY use the SATA power cable.

Using BOTH power cables will burn up the harddrive. May not happen immediately, but I ASSURE you it will happen.

4-pin Peripheral power cable, is also erroneously known as a 'Molex' power cable.
Molex was the first company with the CONNECTOR design. The name stuck. Kind of like calling an adjustable open-end wrench, a Crescent wrench,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

[ IDE (PATA) harddrive shown in photo. Not a SATA harddrive ]

Note that between a SATA power cable, and a SATA data cable; the SATA power cable's connector is longer.
SATA power cable connector has 15-pins.
SATA data cable's connector has 7-pins,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:SATA_ports.jpg

Note the L-shaped opening of the SATA data cable's connector; and the L-shape of the motherboard connector.
The SATA power cable has the same L-shaped opening.

NOTE that color of connectors does NOT matter.
Could be green with pink polka dots.
It is the wire color code, and connector SHAPE, that matters.

[Applies to ALL cables, and connectors}

Sometimes the SATA power cable, and SATA data cable connectors; have a lock on them.
May not see it very well. It is usually a slightly raised bump on the connector. This is depressed with a thumb nail to unlock.

Unlock WHEN installing, and removing.

ALWAYS use the connector when plugging in, or unplugging a cable.
DO NOT pull on the wires.
(Even if you have to stand on your head, and whistle 'Dixie')

I lay the computer opening side UP, on a static free towel, on a table. Much easier to get to the cabling.

ONLY plug in the cables you need, to the Power Supply.
That's what Modular cabling is all about.
Gives more room when not using unnecessary cables, and more air flow through the computer case; for cooling.

I just installed a ThermalTake TR2 600 power supply. It is Modular Cabling also.

I'm willing to bet you didn't plug the Processor (CPU) power cable in.
Either a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable, OR an 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.

Make sure the Ram Memory is seated tightly also.
It get's bumped loose when installing a Power Supply.
No,.....you CANNOT just visually inspect, and let it go at that.

You HAVE to remove ALL ram memory modules ('Stick'), and plug them back in again; to be ASSURED that they/it are seated tightly, and correctly.

Well that about does it for me kid, post back in a Comment if you have additional questions.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Jan 01, 2013 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

M3A770DE 4 pin


Due to the 'large expanse' of information you posted I can barely contain myself.

1) 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable, that plugs into the motherboard,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

Note that this power cable has TWO Yellow 12 Volt wires.

Back in the day there was no additional power cable needed, for the motherboard.
When the Intel Pentium 4 came out, the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable came out also.

Power for the Processor.

More, and more powerful hardware components for the motherboard, (Processor and graphics card), required more power to the motherboard.

The 6-pin PCI Express power cable was brought out,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress

This power cable was used to connect directly to a graphics card, and provide power to it.

Note that this power cable has THREE Yellow 12 Volt wires.
It can carry up to 75 Watts of power.

Still wasn't enough power TO the motherboard, and TO the graphics card, with the new hardware component technology being brought out.

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable was brought out,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#eps8

Note that this power cable has FOUR Yellow 12 Volt wires.
Is capable of providing up to 150 Watts.

A PCI Express x16 slot is capable of providing 75 Watts.

Note the shape of the sockets in the connector.
Now compare to an 8-pin PCI Express power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress8

DO NOT confuse the 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable, with the 8-pin PCI Express power cable.
They are NOT the same.

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable's connector on the motherboard, is at the top left corner of the Processor socket, and close to the outside edge of the motherboard.

(With motherboard installed in computer case)

You can use the motherboard with just a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable.

Look at the LOCK on the side of the 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable's connector.

With that Lock AWAY from you, or on the opposite side of the connector, a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable plugs in on the RIGHT side.

If you have a powerful graphics card installed in your
PCI Express x16 -> slot/S, you had definitely better use a Power Supply that has an 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.

This is a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

Misnomered as a 'Molex' power cable.
{ Molex was the first to design and produce this style of power cable CONNECTOR. The name stuck. Kind of like calling an open-end wrench a Crescent wrench }

IF you use an adapter power cable; Use TWO 4-pin standard Peripheral power cables!!
You need those Yellow 12 Volt wires.

What will happen if you do not use two?

1) The PCI Express x16 slot/s will burn.

2) The gold plated contact pins on the PCI Express graphics card, or cards, will burn.

3) If the graphics card, or graphics cards, require a power cable connected to them;
A) The connections on the graphics card for the power cable will burn.

B) The power cable connector will burn.

Other than that the only other 4-pin references on the motherboard, that I can see, is the optical drive's 4-pin audio cable connector on the motherboard, (CD1), and the CPU (Processor) Fan 4-pin connector on the motherboard.

For additional questions, or if the above is not what you seek, post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Oct 08, 2012 | Asrock M3A770DE ATX AM3 AMD770 DDR3...

1 Answer

REPLACED POWER SUPPLY AND MOTHER BROAD AND STILL CANT GET IT TOO POWER UP


I need you to check something first.
I'm going to get detailed here to explain;

1) The Dell Dimension 1100 (B110) uses a 20-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

The above is a STANDARD pinout for the wires going into a 20-pin ATX main power cable's connector.

For a time period Dell had parts made for their computers, that were PROPRIETARY.
(All pre-built computer manufacturers have their computer parts made by somebody else)

They were Proprietary, in that the STANDARD guidelines for desktop computers was NOT followed.
They had the wires changed around for the 20-pin ATX main power cable.

They also had the pins in the 20-pin ATX main power connector, on the motherboard, changed also.
Means if you plug in an aftermarket Power Supply, it may toast the motherboard, Processor, Ram Memory, Harddrive, graphics card, (IF used), and so on.

Fun stuff huh?
Dell changed from being Proprietary as far as I know.

However you computer may fall into the old proprietary parts.
You need to compare the 20-pin ATX main power cable's connector, of the old Power Supply, TO the new Power Supply's 20-pin ATX main power cable connector.

SEE if those wires (Color code) are going into the same socket holes, as the old one.
Look at the Lock on the side, and use it for the key.

In the Standard 20-pin ATX main power cable's connector, Number 1 pin is the Orange wire, and on the side OPPOSITE of the Lock.
Number 11 wire is also Orange, but is on the same side as the Lock.

Now you have the key, check out the old Power Supply's 20-pin ATX main power cable's connector.
Same color of wires going into the proper socket holes in the main power cable's connector?

Whew! Good! Let's go on.

You need to get the Power Supply going.

Bypass the Power On switch.

IF, you bypass the Power On switch, and the Power Supply comes on, you have a bad $5 Power On switch.

IF you bypass the Power On switch, and the Power Supply does NOT come on, you have a bad Power Supply.

Test has NOTHING to do directly with the Power On switch, or it's wires.
A jumper wire is used on the Soft Power On pin, TO ANY Black wire, in the 20-pin ATX main power cable's connector,

Looking back at the 20-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

The GREEN wire is the Soft Power On wire.
A-N-Y Black wire you see is a Ground wire.

(The power wires are Positive wires. ALL Black wires are Negative wires )

The preferred jumper wire is a paper clip.
Straightened out, then bent into a U-shape.
The top of the U is wrapped a few times with black plastic electrical tape.
This taped area is for your fingers and thumb to hold onto.

Turn the U-shape upside down, and the 'Legs' are what you are going to use.
One leg goes down into a socket hole with the Green wire.
The other leg goes down into ANY socket hole that has a Black wire in it.

The 'Leg' of the jumper wire goes RIGHT NEXT TO the existing wire in the socket hole.
Where the wires go down into the connector of the 20-pin ATX main power cable, is the BACK.
The 20-pin ATX main power cable is plugged into the motherboard, as shown in the photo to the far right, in the Playtool link.

The jumper wire goes down into the Back of the connector, and into the two socket holes named above.
The jumper wire MUST go far enough down into the socket hole of the connector, to go PAST the insulation of the wire, AND touch the metal terminal at the end of the wire.

All wires going into the main power cable's connector, end in a metal terminal,

http://www.molex.com/molex/products/datasheet.jsp?part=active/0002081202_CRIMP_TERMINALS.xml&channel=Products&Lang=en-US

The left side is the Back, and the part that get's crimped on the insulation of the wire. The right side is the Front.
The Front of those Molex metal terminals can be seen in the center photo, of the Playtool link.

Contact made is no more than 2 seconds.
(The Power On switch is A Momentary Contact Switch)

Get the Power Supply going, then post back in a Comment, as to the results.

(Also make SURE the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable is plugged in,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

This is power for the Processor, and sometimes forgotten. NO, it has nothing to do with why the Power Supply does not come on. Just wanted to add.

This is where it plugs into the motherboard,

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dim1100/EN/SM/techov.htm#wp1061217

Processor and heatsink connector (J2E1) is where the Processor sits.
Processor power connector (J5B1) is where the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable plugs in )

May I also ask why a new Power Supply was purchased, and a new motherboard?
Post back in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Sep 19, 2012 | Dell Dimension 1100 PC Desktop

1 Answer

SMPS CONNECTION DIAGRAM


Not a problem, but it would be handier to have the manufacturer Name, and Model Number.

(Back of computer on a sticker, next to the Windows product key, or up on the side of the computer tower )


SMPS = Switched-Mode Power Supply. The style used in personal computers now,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

A) Main power cable:
There are three styles;

1) The old AT style that has two separate connectors. The connectors BOTH connectors have BLACK wires towards one side.

The connectors also have ONLY one way, (Direction), they can be plugged onto the motherboard.
This is due to the Lock, and Locating Tab on the motherboard connector/s, and the main power cables connector/s.

When you can plug the connectors on the motherboard, with both connector's BLACK wires facing each other, (They will be in the middle), you have them installed correctly,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#oldpc

2) The newer ATX style. Uses one power cable, and connector.
First style to come out was the 20-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

20-pin ATX main power cable's connector, has a LOCK on one side.
This Lock locks over a Locating Tab, on the female motherboard connector.

To remove this power cable you squeeze in on the Top of the Lock.
The Lock operates like a see-saw on a playground. When you squeeze the top in, you remove it's hooked end away, from the Locating Tab of the motherboard connector.

To be ensured that this cable is plugged in tightly, and correctly, the Lock's hooked end will be over the Locating Tab, on the motherboard connector.

3) The newest style is the 24-pin ATX main power cable.
As computer hardware evolved, and became better, it demanded more power.
The extra 4 pins of the 24-pin ATX main power cable provided this,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

[ Aftermarket power supply manufacturers, provide power supply's with a 20 + 4-pin ATX main power cable, usually.
You can use it as a 20-pin ATX main power cable, or use the additional 4 pin cable, and use it as a 24-pin ATX main power cable ]

4) Motherboard didn't provide enough power for newer Processors.
The 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable was brought out.
(Has Lock with Locating Tab on the motherboard connector, also)

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

5) Motherboard didn't provide enough power for high-end graphics card.
4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable didn't help.
The 6-pin PCI Express power cable was brought out,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress

Plugs into a graphics card.

[ Note*
In all power cables, Red wires are 5 Volts. Yellow wires are 12 Volts. ALL Black wires are Ground wires ]

Next in line was two versions of the 8-pin power cable.

A) 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.
Originally brought out for server computers, that has multiple Processors.
Plugs into the motherboard.

B) 8-pin PCI Express power cable.
Brought out for more power, than a 6-pin PCI Express power cable could put out.
Plugs into a graphics card.

(6-pin PCI Express power cable is capable of handling 75 Watts.
8-pin PCI Express power cable will handle 150 Watts )

If you have an IDE (PATA) harddrive, a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable is what you need. ('Molex' is the slang term for it's connector)

If you have a SATA harddrive you need a 15-pin SATA power cable.

NOTE*
IF, your SATA harddrive has a provision for a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable, AND a SATA power cable;

ONLY USE the SATA power cable!

If you use both you will burn out the harddrive. Maybe not immediately, but I assure you down the road you will.
(Do not use just a single 4-pin standard peripheral power cable, either)

Optical drive/s use a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable, if they are IDE (PATA) units.
If they are SATA units they use a SATA power cable.

The old Floppy Drives use a 4-pin small Peripheral power cable.
Same cable plugs into a Card Reader, also.

The plastic front of your computer is the Front Panel.

The area of contact pins on the motherboard, that the cables, (Wires), from the Front Panel go to, is the Front Panel header.

Sometimes abbreviated on the motherboard as;
F_PANEL 1, or FP1, etc.

I will need to know the computer manufacturer name, and Model Number, (HP = Product Number, or P/N), or the manufacturer name, and Model Number of the motherboard, to TRY to provide this information.

Post back in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Apr 12, 2012 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

No power when connecting atx12V on main


did you plug in the 24 pin main of the power supply in some also take a 4 pin as well on board jim

Jul 17, 2011 | ASUS P5VDC-X Motherboard

2 Answers

Where can I get a speaker connector?


After a few hours of looking on line and finding nothing I decided to make my own Sharp Receiver connectors. Here are the steps that I took:


_1349.jpgItems I used were wire strippers, wire snips, a file and a sugar free Rockstar (not pictured items: computer power supply, fine grit sandpaper and zip-ties).


_1350.jpg The first this I did was find the 4 pin connector and the 20 pin connector (some times a 16 pin) on the pc power supply and i cut the wires so that there was about 10" to 12" of wire hanging from each connector. These are the 2 connectors need from the power supply to use in your Sharp Receiver.


_1351.jpg This is the smaller of the 2 connectors (the 4 pin) and nothing needs to be done with this one. It fits perfectly into the back of the Sharp Receiver into the area labeled " surround sound". I would just zip tie the wires 3" from the connector and then 6" from the connector.


_1352.jpg The large connector I cut from the pc power supply is the one where all the work needs to be done. The Sharp Receiver requires an 8 pin connector for the are labeled "front speakers/center speakers/sub woofer". Notice the location of the clip for this connector and that it is centered, we need this clip to remain in the center when we are done so re are going to have to remove every thing from it except for the center 8 pins.


_1353.jpg What I did to get the connector to look like this picture is I cut the 6 pins off on both ends of the connector (you would only cut the 4 pins off both end if you are using a 16 pin connector from the power supply). after I cut those pins off I just pulled the wires out from the back side (they come out very easy after you cut the pins off). Now we need to get rid of the extra plastic where we cut the pins. Please view the next 2 pictures before you begin to do your cut.


_1354.jpg
_1355.jpg Notice how I left the plastic intact surrounding the 8 remaining pins we are using. I know that it seems like common sense to do it this way but there's people out there who would have cut the plastic so the pins we need are showing. There may be some jagged edged now from where u cut the extra plastic so to get rid of that we are going to use a file or a grinder. Don't grind the sides completely down though, I left a little bit of the ridges because the new ends have thin plastic walls and if you leave a little of the ridges, it will make it a little stronger.


_1356.jpg I tried to put my, now 8 pin, connector in the back of my Sharp Receiver and it was really snug. This is where the fine grit sandpaper comes in handy. just go around each of the 8 pins with the sandpaper, not a lot, just enough so the pins slide into the plug easy and doesn't wiggle. I used 2 zip-ties on this connector also to secure the wired a little more. Again, 3" and 6" from the connector. Now its ready to be plugged into the area labeled "front speakers/center speakers/sub woofer".


_1357.jpg This is what it should look like when you are all done making the speaker connectors for your Sharp Receiver. All that's left is to connect your speaker wires to your speaker connectors and then all of your components.
I only found 1 website that had the parts for this unit for sale and it was about $50 plus shipping for the connectors. You can get the computer power supply from your local area on www.craigslist.org for $5 or $10, you might have one lying around. If you have any questions or need additional help with this please feel free to email me: jlusk80 @ gmail.com
Thanks for reading my solution!

Jan 01, 2011 | Sharp HT-DP3000 System

2 Answers

My dc7100 has a compact power supply with proprietary 24 pin plug. Pretty sure power supply is non-functional (shorted green to black and fan didn't come on). Is it possible to rewire a conventional ATX...


I just spotted this, hence the late solution. Perhaps this will help someone in the future.

Yes it is possible.

Observe the color code of the insulation of the wires.

1) Orange wires are 3.3 Volts

2) Red wires are 5 Volts

3) Yellow wires are 12 Volts

4) The Green wire is the Soft Power On wire

5) All Black wires are Ground wires. Doesn't matter which Black wire it is, it's a Ground wire.
(It isn't a Common wire. This is DC electricity, not AC)

These are your main voltages, and wires to be concerned with.

Fortunately all HP, (Or any proprietary computer manufacturer in that time period), did, was to change where the wires are placed in the 20, or 24-pin ATX main power cable connector.

They just moved the wires in the socket holes, didn't change the color code.

Solution is,
1) To remove the wires in the ATX power supply, main power cable connector
2) To remove the wires in the proprietary computer's ATX main power cable connector.

(NOTE*
BE SURE to make a concise, clear, drawing FIRST, of where the colors of the wires went in the proprietary connector, BEFORE you remove them!)

3) To reinstall the wires into the proprietary connector.
(Again. Following the color code of the wires you removed)

Removing the wires out of the 20, or 24-pin ATX main power cable connector:

Observe these photos, of a 20-pin ATX main power cable's connector. This procedure can be applied to a 24-pin ATX main power cable connector also. (Or a 20 + 4-pin ATX main power cable connector)

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

(Also gives you information about the color code of the wires)

The middle photo shows you a view of the Front of the connector.
The photo to the right shows you the Back of the connector.

Where the wires go down into the connector is a Socket Hole.
At the end of each wire is a metal pin connector. A Male pin connector.

This metal pin connector is shaped like a tube on the end, and comes up to a square shape as you go up.
The square shape fits the square socket hole.

On one side of the square shape is a Tang. It's part of the square metal shape, and sticks out away from the square shape.
Resembles a barb on a fish hook.

In this crude illustration, let a small L represent the side of the square shape, and this forward slash - / represent the tang.

l/

This is an illustration from a manufacturer that supplies this type of metal Male pin connector,

http://www.molex.com/molex/products/datasheet.jsp?part=active/0002092166_CRIMP_TERMINALS.xml&channel=Products&Lang=en-US

A needle with the proper thickness so it won't bend, is inserted into the Front side of the socket hole, and is used to depress the Tang.

If you look down into the back of the connector, and into an individual socket hole with a bright light, and a magnifying glass, you will observe that the square socket hole has a small notch in one side.
This is where the tang slides down into.

It isn't easy to see from the front side.

The tang is depressed using the needle from the FRONT of the ATX main power cable connector, and the wire is removed from the Back side of the connector.

The metal pin connector's tube shape only goes up so far, then it turns into a square shape.

The socket hole in the connector is shaped to match. Tube shaped hole at the front of the connector, square shape coming on up to the back of the connector.

The square shape's corners, of the metal pin connector, keep it from coming out of the Front of the ATX main power cable connector.

The tang keeps the metal pin connector from coming out of the Back.

More information about the color code of the wires in an ATX main power cable connector, (Scroll towards the bottom of the page)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_power_supply



Oct 16, 2009 | HP Compaq dc7100 PC Desktop

1 Answer

Blowing fuses


you may have the rem wire hooked up to the yellow 12v battery wire located on your harness. try yellow to yellow and if your rem is not working correctly when is hooked blue to blue put in on the red ignition wire located on your harness. should solve the problem. or return it

Mar 02, 2008 | AudioControl KVT-911DVD Car Video Player

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