Question about Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ1 Digital Camera

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Flash problems flash is not working properly. i think it is not going off in time or something, pictures turn out very dark or over exposed.

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Re: flash problems

When you shootting on the dark place try to half press the shutter , to compensate the distance ,focus, and etc. to accurate the shot.

Posted on Dec 28, 2007

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Re: flash problems

This seems to be a common problem with the TZ1. Same thing is happening to mine. Just google 'TZ1 flash problem'. You'll find plenty to read.

Posted on Dec 25, 2007

Re: flash problems

I've been in touch with one of the Panasonic repair centres and they reckon the problem is with the timing, which seems to fit with what everyone is saying. We've sent the camera off and they think it should be about £45 to fix.

Posted on Dec 06, 2007

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My manual setting is not working. Everytime I try to take a picture using manual mode without flash its dark.

Just to make sure, you are setting the proper exposure? In manual mode you have to set both the aperture and shutter speed yourself. If you don't set them properly then you'll get under- or over-exposed pictures.

Mar 19, 2013 | Canon EOS 1100D / Rebel T3 Digital Camera

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Downloaded pix from Rebel XT turn out really dark on my PC

Hi Dborror,
This is a very nice camera, it would not be good not to use it, because of a silly problem such as this.
The first thing to remember, is that the camera has a very bright light to look through the photos to prevent glare and other problems.
  1. Look at the histogram when you shoot, may need to compensate the exposure, make sure it isnt set to something by factory default.
  2. Another factor to consider with fluorescent lights is that they 'flicker' 60 times a second rather than being on continuously like an incandescent bulb. This isn't obvious to the naked eye but if your shutter speed is less than 1/60 it can, and will, affect your exposure.
  3. One of your problems is that you expect the result out of the camera to be perfect.With most digitals, and with this camera you might have to do the tweaking yourself, the odd time. Personally most of my shots come out a bit on the dark side becuase I know that is better than being over exposed and I tweak in my editing programs.
I hope I've sheaded some light on your problem, and if your problem persists I'll mess around with mine to ee if I can help you a bit more. Have a good evening, and happy new year.

Dec 30, 2007 | Canon Rebel XT / EOS 350D Digital Camera

1 Answer

My pictures are coming out too dark

There are four ways to make the image lighter
a) more light (flash, sun, etc)
b) slower shutter speed (allows more time for light to "expose" the sensor)
c) larger aperture (bigger hole = more light)
d) higher ISO (basically, amplify the available light more).

If you are using a point and shoot camera, the flash is usually only good for about 10 feet, so trying to get a good bright picture of subjects further away won't work.

Items b, c, and d are handled by the camera in automatic mode. In manual mode, set the iso has high as it can go. Set the aperture as large as it can go, and decrease the shutter speed.

Depending on the camera, you can enable the histogram to see if the images are too dark, usually by pressing the display button while taking pictures. If the histogram is off to the left edge, the picture will be too dark.

In post-processing, (e.g. photoshop), you can use Levels (control-shift-L for auto-levels) and it will move the histogram to the right, making the picture look brighter.

Feb 27, 2011 | Digital Cameras

1 Answer

The problem is that u know the sony hdv xr500x when u put it on the picture is very dark we have tried it under light too put but the picture is still dark

When you look at your pictures are they dark, murky and hard to see? If you took pictures at a wedding, dance recital, theater performance or any indoor event and they came out dark, read on to learn why your pictures are dark, and how to fix this common camera problem.

Many people take pictures of indoor events, only to be unsatisfied with the final outcome of their photos. Although you may have bought the top of the line film or digital camera, there are a few limitations that you need to know about.
To correctly expose your pictures, you camera needs a lot of light. The compact point and shoot varieties adjust for this when you're outside during the daytime, and usually your pictures turn out fine, right? Well, then how come when you take indoor pictures, they sometimes come out too dark? There are two culprits; your zoom function and your flash.
Most compact cameras today offer a zoom function. When I used to work in retail photography sales, the first feature that consumers would ask for is zoom. People love to get close-up pictures without using their feet. Although zoom does bring your subject matter in closer, it also decreases the amount of light that can get into your camera. Essentially, the more you zoom, the less light your camera can receive, and your pictures will be darker.
So, if your taking pictures indoors, in a dark church, gym or other window-less room it is very difficult for your camera to get enough light to properly expose your pictures.
This is when most photographers decide to turn on their flash. The flash on your camera is a great tool to illuminate dark situations that are in close proximity to the camera. Most built-in flash units are designed to allow the light to travel 8-10 feet away in poor quality light and up to 15-20 feet in brighter situations.
What most camera users fail to realize is that although your zoom function is visually bringing you closer to the action, you flash cannot reach that far to illuminate the subject, and your pictures will be dark.
Hope it helps, if so do rate the solution

Dec 21, 2010 | Sony Digital Cameras

1 Answer

Nikon d40x

It sounds like your flash capacitor isn't fully charged up and your taking a photo and there isn't enough power charged up, so your photos turn out too dark. Take a photo, wait for a minute or til you see the flash icon inside the viewfinder lit up and then try taking another photo.

Jan 01, 2009 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

1 Answer

Background is overexposed

So, the problem doesn't seem to be the flash if the actual subject in the foreground is exposed properly. My guess is that the background is being lit by another light source. Typically, your camera uses a flash for dark areas or what it gauges as a dark area. This doesn't adjust the background for additional light sources. For example, if you're standing outside and there's a tree covering someone that you're taking a picture of your flash will adjust to "properly" light that individual. However, because the flash was used for the main subject, the background is actually now overexposed. The overexposed background will show up as a brightly lit area because the camera had to adjust for the foreground. This will actually reverse itself when it's dark out - meaning if the background and foreground are dark, the flash will expose the foreground, but the background will be black. Hopefully, that helps you understand lighting and exposure. Now, to fix this problem when shooting, you would need to consider several options - 1. SLR camera with aperture and f-stop settings as well as compensation controls. This will allow you to control every element of the exposure, but you still need to be aware of the lighting behind the "subject" to properly expose your shots. 2. backlighting compensation - common settings on both SLR and point and shoot cameras that makes auto lighting conversions for backlighting and other common lighting issues. Test whatever options are on your camera to see what works best for your specific problem. 3. Photoshop retouching - you may take one shot with your subject exposed properly and a second shot with the background then merge the images together. 4. using a tripod to shoot without using the flash - this may give you the closest exposure to exactly what you see when looking at your subject.

Dec 19, 2008 | Polaroid i733LP Digital Camera

2 Answers

Falsh Problem with Power Shot a640

I had the exact same problem. You'll need to send it back to Canon. It'll cost you $87-94, but they'll clean it up, get the flash working, and make it new again. It's a good camera worth getting fixed.

Sep 14, 2008 | Canon PowerShot A640 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Indoor picture too dark with flash

Hey Jewdeit,
The built in flash on the K100D has guide # of 52 at iso 200 which does fine for close-up photography and as fill flash outdoors, but is not a powerful enough flash for shooting far away subjects indoors. What you probably should do is purchase an external shoe mounted flash such as the AF540FGZ which has a much higher guide number of 148 at iso 100. When shooting with flash if you are using aperture priority or full manual you can also try opening the aperture to let in more light that the flash put out, but doing this might over expose anything in the foreground.

Go Ahead. Use Us.

May 06, 2008 | Pentax K100D Digital Camera

1 Answer

CANON Rebel RTI Outdoor pictures are dark

learning to use light metering correctly can have its challenge.
the manual will guide you on how to set up to read light from the subject. spot metering a dark area will cause general overexposure, or a washed out look. spot metering a bright area will cause a dark image. if you are on spot meter and shoot two people standing together against a bright lit background, your meter will see between them if they are centered, and read all that bright background, setting the camera to a less sensitive combination of aperture / shutter speed, resulting in a dark image. use field averaging meter setting and be sure you are metering the subject and not the background. try shooting a wall that is fairly clear of other colors and uniform it light hitting it, you should have a correctly exposed image. since it works in other modes (at least 1, anyway) then it is unlikely you have an exposure compensation issue. that is the only other non defect issue that would cause your problem.
once you confirm that you have these settings correct and still get a dark image, its time to have it serviced.
good luck

Sep 01, 2007 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera...

1 Answer

Flash doesn`t work!!

In warranty case however, in order to repair the above mentioned error you should replace the flash circuit board part number:A1166208A.Price for the spare part is 35 Euro (for my account). If you need more info please advice.

Mar 30, 2007 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W50 Digital Camera

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