Question about Nikon Coolpix L11 Digital Camera

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Slow shutter speed

I want to take pictures of my pets, but CANNOT keep them still long enough to take the picture. Is there any way to make the shutter faster? I basically just need to point and shoot without it trying to adjust...

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  • Nikon Master
  • 102,366 Answers

Either shoot with more light, like outdoors in the sun, or else force the flash on by pressing cursor-up (marked with a lightning bolt) and selecting the lightning bolt icon.

Posted on Aug 28, 2012

  • kakima Aug 28, 2012

    Either shoot with more light, like outdoors in the sun, or else force the flash on by pressing cursor-up (marked with a lightning bolt) and selecting the lightning bolt icon.

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: Panasonic DMC FZ30 shutter speed adjustment

set to s -then adjust using command wheel by thumb- 8 secs to 1/2000

Posted on Feb 05, 2008

sparkysbox
  • 61 Answers

SOURCE: shooting in low light with a canon rebel xt

Hello parr_alp,
Please keep in mind that when shooting in low light, you will ALWAYS get some amount of blur when you are hand holding the camera unless you use a flash. The only way to increase your shutter speed is to crank up your ISO setting to 800, 1200, 1600, etc. If there is no tripod handy, brace yourself against a stationary object and remember to keep your elbows tucked down near your body when shooting (no sense in holding up your arms, too).
There is no way to increase the ISO limits of your camera while maintaining quality of your images. And once again, you will ALWAYS get a certain amount of blur when hand holding the camera. 
The external flash not firing is an entirely separate issue. This could have to do with your metering, a bad flash, bad connection in the hot shoe, what shooting mode you're in — the possibilities are numerous. The next time your flash doesn't work, write down all the settings of your camera and keep track of them (i.e. shooting mode, metering mode, flash settings, current lighting situations, etc.) You may start to notice a pattern and perhaps we can help you here.
Anyway, happy shooting, and if this response was helpful, please rate it! Thank you!
Jeff

Posted on Mar 13, 2009

issy2
  • 460 Answers

SOURCE: I find that the shutter

Its not configurable. You will have to use it as it is. Try to hold the camera still while taking the photo and after clicking the photo hold it for extra 1 second.

Thankyou
Appreciate a good rating from you.


Posted on Aug 01, 2009

  • 11967 Answers

SOURCE: slow shutter speed

1. Low battery 2. Memory card has too many pictures on it. 3. Memory card needs to be formatted in the camera after downloading the pictures.

Posted on Dec 14, 2009

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1 Answer

Slow snapping picture


I am not sure, but have you played with the camera manual setting ?
if you did
you should change the shutter speed to a higher level (if you have used the manual mode)
but if you use the automatic mode and the light around you was low the shutter speed will be automatically low so the camera could give you a better picture be lowering the shutter speed so it could have the enough time to collect the light (that's why the snapping is slow)
so try to increase the iso or the av (lowering the av's number)
hopefully, I have helped you

Mar 06, 2014 | Minolta Maxxum 400si 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Yellow light on when ready to take picture


On some cameras this means a slow shutter speed and that the picture may come out blurry because there's not enough available light for a faster shutter speed to get an acceptably sharp picture.

Feb 27, 2014 | FUJIFILM HS20 EXR Digital Camera

1 Answer

My D60 only when I use the flash I get an error message job nr


Job NR is usually associated with the camera's processing time during very slow shutters. If you wait long enough it will show you the image you've taken but because the shutter is very slow, the image will be blurry and unrecognizable. On manual mode or Shutter speed priority change your shutter speed to at least .125 of a second. That should fix the problem.

Apr 16, 2013 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera

2 Answers

I'm using the sports mode and all my shots are blurry and orange


It may just be too dark for action photography. Try turning your ISO up to 1000+. Set your computer in Tv (Time Priority Mode). Use the top wheel to adjust the shutter time to something like 200 or greater. Keep an eye on the aperture value. If it starts flashing, you don't have enough light to support your settings.

Aug 12, 2012 | Canon EOS Digital Rebel XS / 1000D IS...

1 Answer

My shutter speed is very slow and when I take pictures I think when it's dark is when I notice the problem but the picture will not take. Also if someone moves their face is blurry.


What mode are you shooting in? It seems you may either have your shutter speed set manually to a slow speed or, alternatively you have set your apperture set to a high number e.g f/20 or there abouts. Because this is a very narrow apperture the camera will compensate by using a slow shutter speed.
Try some shots in fully automatic mode and see what happens. With a slow shutter speed you can expect any movement to produce blurred images.

Oct 21, 2011 | Nikon D90 Digital Camera with 18-105mm...

1 Answer

I did not get any instructions with my Opteka. Have tried to take photos with it. But they came out all blank. I used a tripod. Would like to know where I can down load instructions. Certainly not as good...


You did not provide enough information to determine what your problem is. For example, were the pictures all light or all dark. Knowing this lens, I will assume that they were all dark. So...

1) This is a very, very slow manual-focus lens. It will not auto focus. It must be manually focused very precisely because it has virtually no depth of field.
2) Depending on your camera, your internal light meter may not work. On my camera (Nikon D-90), it does. If it does not on yours and I suspect that may be your problem, you're going to have to shoot everything manually, i.e. setting the shutter speed and lens opening yourself. You can use your internal light meter to help you get started by taking your light reading before you install the lens...preferably using the aperture only setting where you set the aperture at f8 which I think is the speed of the Opteka and let the camera set the shutter speed. Make a note of the shutter speed then attach the Opteka to the camera and mount the lens on a tripod with the camera attached.
Then set your camera mode to manual and set the aperture to match the lens (f8, I think). Set the shutter speed at the speed you noted earlier. Shoot a picture using a remote shutter release or the self timer. This lens is so slow that unless you're in exceptionally bright conditions you will get fuzzy pictures due to camera movement at full zoom of 1200m and above if you're using the 2X doubler. I would start shooting at minimum zoom of 650 without the 2X doubler. Shoot a picture. and check the result.

You should have an image but it may be too light or too dark.

If its too light you'll need to increase the shutter speed or stop down the aperture to, say, f11...or both. Make the adjustment and shoot another picture. Remember that if you increase the aperture, you increase your depth of field, making focus less critical. If you increase the shutter speed you make camera or subject movement less critical.

If it's too dark, you can only increase the shutter speed because you can't open the lens any wider than f8. Make the adjustment and shoot the picture.

Keep doing this until the pictures are the way you want them.

This is a decent lens for the price and worth the little money they cost if you can't afford $10,000 plus for a high quality telephoto lens of this size. I would forget about the 2X doubler because as others have said, it further reduces the speed of an already very slow lens with such a high rate of magnification that a knat landing on the lens could cause the picture to blur from movement.

Jun 26, 2011 | Opteka 650-2600mm High Definition...

1 Answer

Nixon S8100 fairly new camera, nice pics if the subject doesnt move but horrible pictures if object moves. Very blurry.


If everything in the picture is blurry, you are moving the camera when you press the shutter button. If only the subject is blurry and the background is clear the problem is too slow shutter speed. If this is cause by movement of the camera you must learn to SQUEESE the button while being sure you don't move the camera. It just takes a little practice. If this problem caused by a shutter speed that is too slow, it is remedied by increasing the ISO "film" speed. Even though you have no film, the camera has a "speed" setting that relates to that. The higher ISO value increases the camera's sensitivity to light and thus allows for faster shutter speed. Normally the ISO choices are 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600. Try using 400. The ISO setting is in one of your camera menus. 400 is fast enough to solve your problem in all but very fast movement of either the camera or subject. Using ISO above 400 will cause your pictures to look grainy and not as sharp. Use the highest speed only when absolutely necessary. Slower ISO numbers produce the finest grain and thus the sharpest pictures. It a trade off between ISO and shutter speed because the exposure is a combination of the ISO and shutter speed and lens opening. Each one effects the exposure by half or double.

Apr 16, 2011 | Nikon Cameras

1 Answer

Pictures are blurry


There are a few things to consider:

-- Are your hands steady as you take the shot, and are you moving the camera before the shutter actually clicks? As a test, put the camera down on a table top and take a picture without moving the camera until well after the shutter clicks. If the resulting image is not blurry--you just proved that your holding technique needs improvement!

--This camera has image stabilization to help you deal with camera shake--do you have this feature turned on in the menu?

--If your subjects are moving and your shutter speed is slow (meaning that the shutter stays open a relatively long time to gather enough light) then you will get blur. And, even if your subject is not moving but the shutter speed is slow, then your camera shake will come back to haunt you.

To fix slow shutter speed, you can either use a flash to freeze the action, or you can manually increase the ISO setting to a higher number, or you can choose a preset like "sports" which will tell the camera you want faster shutter speeds. A higher ISO setting will allow for faster shutter speeds, but it can also result in a grainy look, called "noise" if you set it too high.

Most likely it is your holding technique and the setting you are choosing that is causing the blur. If you are in decently bright light outdoors, you hold your camera steady and wait for the shutter to click, and you have image stabilization on, then you should have sharp pictures. If you are indoors, expect to need a flash.

Nov 25, 2010 | Canon PowerShot SX100 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

How do you take a picture of a fast movement?


It depends on the effect you want.
  • To freeze motion, you need either a fast shutter speed, or a fast flash in a dark environment. In less than bright light you may not be able to get a fast enough shutter speed to stop the action. Increasing the camera's sensitivity to light by increasing the ISO will help some.
  • You can blur the motion by using a slower shutter speed and a stable camera. Set a slow shutter speed and put the camera on a tripod or other stable surface, and you can get things like streaking car taillights and star trails. How slow a shutter speed depends on the speed of the subject.
  • You can pan with the subject. Move the camera with the subject, and keep it moving even while the display blanks out while taking the picture. This will keep the subject sharper while blurring the background to lend a sense of motion to the picture.
  • It's either to freeze motion if the subject is moving straight toward or away from you than if it's moving across your field of vision.

Sep 10, 2010 | Canon PowerShot S2 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

Shutter speed


shutter speed has nothing to do with battery power. If you have a SLR camera you use the shutter speed option when you want to have control of the shutter speed, slow shutter speed means if your taking a picture of a waterfall and you want to see the actual droplets you set a slow shutter speed, if you want it to look more smooth/flowing you set a faster shutter speed, if you do not have a SLR camera you probably dont have much say so in shutter speed...

May 28, 2008 | Nikon FE 35mm SLR Camera

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