Question about Nikon D40x (AF-S 55-200 VR) Digital Camera

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When I try to view pictures on the camera there is an overlay that describe the camera, metering, shutter, aperature ect. How do I get that off?

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Press up/down on the multiselector to cycle through the different views.

Posted on Dec 31, 2009

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What is the suggested aperature/shutter speed?


That depends on the amount of light on the subject. You neglected to specify the model of your Canon camera, but most of them have a light meter built-in. That light meter should suggest the proper exposure.

Dec 01, 2012 | Ilford FP4 Plus 125 36 Exp. Black & White...

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Can't take any photo with my Canon S3IS any more. The view finder and the screen is black when I try to take some photo but I am able to see all photo that is already on my memory card in the view finder...


Look into the lense while setting the shutter speed at a half second or so (slow enough for you to see the shutter open and close) and click the shutter release... you should see the shutter open and close. If you don't see this, then you may have a 'sticky shutter' resulting from lubricant seeping into the shutter/aperature mechanism and preventing the shutter from functioning as it should.(Common problem reported with the S2 and S3 cameras... and probably the S1 as well)

I have gotten my S3IS to take pictures by turning on the power, then opening the battery compartment door and reclosing it repeatedly until the shutter opens (from the power surge) and an image appears on the LCD.

After confirming the sticky shutter was indeed the problem, I pursued a more permanent fix.

Jan 30, 2011 | Canon PowerShot S3 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

All images on my slr digital camera are very light almost non existent picture


have you checked your exposure and aperture? To high an exposure or too large and aperature can affect the picture quality. I have a model like this I think. When you look in the view finder, there is a meter with a meter that, if the batteries are good, should move up when there is too much light, and down when there's not enough. If you can get that meter to the middle, you'll be OK. The closer to the middle that needle is, the better the quality. :)

Jan 29, 2011 | Pentax K1000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Minolta Maxxum 400si 35mm Is this a good camera? My husband and I are thinking about buying one used for our daughter who wants to get into photography. We found what looks like a good deal but I don't...


The Miinolta 400 si SLR 35 mm is an excellent camera for a beginner as well as the seasoned photographer. It has a complete automatic mode for the point & shoot picture taker as well as manual modes if you want to favor shutter speed over aperature or aperature over shutter speed. I've had one for years and have gotten excellent results.

Dec 09, 2010 | Minolta Maxxum 400si 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

Cannot take indoor photos without flash


Hello,

Just as "Wrestling" explained, your camera is operating properly. There simply isn't enough light in the scene that you are trying to photograph. If you're new to photography, it's sometimes hard to remember that the human brain/eye combination is an incredible thing, and no camera can compete with a human being.

What I mean is, there is enough light in your room for your eyes to see detail, but not enough for your camera to 'see' the detail without additional light from your flash. However, there are a couple things you can try.

1. Raise the ISO setting on your camera (check your manual, it's easy). Turn the camera on, press and hold the ISO button (left top of camera) and rotate the main command dial (back of camera, upper left corner). Rotate left or right to lover or raise the ISO number. Watch in the top information panel as the ISO numbers change. Higher ISO numbers mean the camera is more sensative to light; you can take pictures when there is less light available. HOWEVER, there is a trade-off. The higher your ISO number, the more noise/grain your image will have. I think the ISO of the D200 is acceptable for enlargements (8x10's) up to about ISO 640 or 800. I'm very picky, you might find higher ISO settings work fine for your needs, especially if you are not making larger prints. Experiment! remember to change your ISO back to a lower setting when you're done with your low light pictures.

2. Take your camera off the fully automatic "P" mode (where the camera makes all the decisions), and change your shutter speed to a slower speed. The slower shutter speed lets more light into the camera, because the 'eye' (the shutter) is open longer. (Use the "S" mode where you set the shutter speed and the camera selects an appropriate aperature). HOWEVER, there is a trade-off again. The slower your shutter speed the more likely you are to have blurred pictures; your subject will move or your camera will shake. If you're taking pictures of a stationary object or an adult, you can tell the person to sit very still and experiment! As for reducing camera shake, first and foremost, learn to hold the camera properly. I can't stress this enough...it's the biggest reason for blurred photos that I see. learn/practice squeezing the shutter realease, not stabbing it. Then, invest in a lens with the Vibration Reduction feature.


3. Take your camera off of the fully automatic "P" mode and change your aperature. (If you like, you can use the "A" mode where you set the aperature and the camera selects the shutter speed for you). The aperature is how wide open the shutter "eye" opens with each picture. Think of your own eye. In bright sunlight, your pupils close down to small openings, as there is a lot of light available. If you are in a dark room, your pupils open as wide as possible to let as much light into your eye as possible. That's the same way a camera works. So, if you are in a darker room, you need to let more light into the camera...that means a larger aperature. The tricky part to remember is that the LARGEST aperature has the smallest number. That means a 3.5 aperature is a larger opening than an aperature of 16. HOWEVER, once again there is a trade-off, as a larger aperature means you have a smaller depth-of-field; depth of field means the area of your picture that is in focus. I'm sure you've seen landscape photos, where every detail is in sharp focus, the far away mountains and clouds, as well as small rocks and grass or a steam in the forground. That is created by a small aperature with a wide/deep depth of field. Then think of a portrait in a magazine or taken by a studio, where the person is in focus, but the background fades off into a pleasing blur. That's done with a large aperature and a narrow/shallow depth of field.

NOTE: The widest aperature available is determined by your lens, so you can't use all the aperature settings with every lens. Your camera knows this and will only adjust to whatever your lens has available. That's why you might have different settings available with different lenses. Experiment!!

OK, sorry if that was long-winded, but the D-200 is a great camera, yours is operating properly, and I want you to enjoy using it!

Jan 01, 2009 | Nikon D200 Body Only Digital Camera

1 Answer

A little help if you would be so kind? I have just aguiered a Pentax ME super and am having a little bit of trouble understanding the light meter. The worse thing is I also have the manual, which you'd...


Hi Nathan,

Let's start shooting without film, first.

Example: shooting outside on a bright day, let says between 10:00 to 14:00 with some clouds.

Set camera ASA/ISO to 100
Set lens to the highest number, that's the largest F Stop number.
Set camera to P, which is program. Camera will select aperature and shutter for you.
All you need is the focus and look at those LED lights, to make sure it won't lit & flashing up at the top as well as on the bottom.

If you are viewing a image that is bight without clouds, then the Shutter should be 125 and the Aperature 16. If in the shade, it will be Aperaure 11.

Start with that first.

atdlee@netzero.com

Nov 21, 2008 | Pentax Cameras

1 Answer

My photos are coming out slightly grainy in low light. Have played around with ISO and aperture etc but no luck. All modes have the same problem. Camera= canon powershot S5 I5


When you use auto mode on most point and shoot digital cameras ( which includes the F717) the camera software gets to choose aperature, shutter speed, and ISO setting. When the ISO setting is used at the faster ISOs, the images get digital 'noisy' very quickly. There is a much higher noise level in consumer digicams at the higher ISOs, because the sensor chip is much smaller than in the digital SLRs. F2.0 suggests yoiu are shooting at the maximum aperature of your lens and that the light is pretty dim.
If you learn to use your camera in the Av ( aperature preferred) mode at ISOs of 50 or 100, most of the noise you are describing will disappear. The camera should take very nice images at ISOs less than 200.

Consult your manual on aperature preferred or manul setting of the ISO speed

Nov 20, 2008 | Canon Cameras

3 Answers

Nikon NEWBIE


put simply the ISO number is how sensitive the film is to light, the higher the number the more sensitive the film. The ISO on the camera sets the exposure system to give the proper exposure for that film (the f/n80 usually sets the ISO automaticly). Also the higher the ISO the more grainy the picture, I would recommend using ISO 200 film for the pictures you describe. I would set the camera to the P setting it is a good all-around setting.

Nov 18, 2008 | Nikon F80 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Slow sutter speed/Lag in taking a picture


Use full auto mode or take out of Aperature priority, you may be shooting with a very small aperature setting and not know it. Also shutter priority can be set to a slow shutter speed.

Sep 24, 2008 | Fuji FinePix S5000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Grainy pictures


grainy pictures are possibly casued by a very high ISO (sensativity) setting, you should be on 100 or lower for best normal shots. Higher settings are for low light and custom shooting in strange lighting or aperature/shutter speeds. Try full auto setting.

Mar 03, 2008 | Canon PowerShot S3 IS Digital Camera

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