Question about Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Does it hurt anything to draw the cold air from my basement before it goes through my a/c condenser located in my furnace. I would still be using a filter.. Would this process help reduce electrical cost ??

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that gotĀ 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 20 times.

    Hot-Shot:

    An expert who has answered 20 questions.

  • Expert
  • 142 Answers

Possibly. Your a/c won't work so hard to remove the heat and you should see the unit run for a bit of a shorter duration.

Posted on Jun 26, 2009

  • shamoke Jun 24, 2011

    Pulling return air form a basement is not a good idea. You will not save on cooling costs and you will starve your system for air if the basement has no ventilation and it will not cool your upstairs or remove the humidity properly. Always run return air form the conditioned space, never an unconditioned space.

×

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

Why is water coming out of my furnace exhaust pipe?


When natural gas or propane burns, water vapor is given off within the flu gasses so a bit of condensation in, off and around the flu discharge is quite normal. If it is a high efficiency furnace with the pvc flu pipe, they must be pitched properly BACK TO the furnace so the moisture will drain backwards and out a drain tap at the bottom of the riser. That style of furnace will have TWO drains...one up high for the air conditioner coil and one about 16" up from the bottom of the furnace off of the 'condensing coil' that the flue gasses pass through to extract a much greater amount of heat from the burned gas.

Many flu pipes are installed incorrectly which causes water to drip outside instead of back to the furnace and this usually results in huge icicles hanging off of them in the winter and eventually the partial blockage causes the flu's pressure switch to open.

If you have regular galvanized flu pipe, you have less than a 90% high efficiency furnace and the resultant flu gas temperature is much higher with a much greater quantity of water vapor in it. A little condensation is somewhat normal on the top of the flu cap as the hot moisture laden vapor comes in contact with the cold and dry outside air. If the moisture is all over the galvanized flu pipe in the basement, you are possibly venting into an oversized and unlined masonry chimney. IF that's the case, the chimney should really be lined with a flexible liner and properly connected to the furnace and water heater (if gas fired) with the proper connections and configuration.

Mar 25, 2015 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Furnace problems


It would be great if you could post a picture of the installation and the state you are located in. The sound is sometimes caused when the fuel to air mixture is to lean. If your fresh air pipe is too close to the exhaust it can suck in the exhaust and cause all sorts of problems with combustion. Also, if you are in cold climate and the fresh air pipe is not piped to the outside (on the same wall as the exhaust), you can damage the heat exchanger.

Mar 03, 2013 | Global Industrial Navien Np-240a-Ng,...

1 Answer

Does gas furnace need exterior air or interior air


Follow what the the makes say in there manual

Feb 02, 2013 | Goodman Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

My high efficiency furnace has water (possibly condensation) running down the air intake pvc pipe into the furnace and all over the burner, gas valve, and wiring.


First, check the drainline from the furnace. You have a 90% gas fired furnace. Where 80% furnace has 1 heat exchanger, yours has 2 heat exchangers. And the second heat exchanger will cool the exhaust enough, that it ends up below the dew point, and your furnace outlet/exhaust will condensate. This drain is probably stopped up. Now, I've installed and service many of these systems and I've only seen the piping at the roof you described once. And that was when the roofers replaced the roof, damaged the furnace flue pipe, and tried to repair it themselves. Normally, and this may not apply to yours, we tie in the exhaust/supply lines about 2-3 ft. above the furnace. Then 1 pipe goes through the roof. Thus 1 pipe is a kit that has an inner liner & outer pipe(2 pipes in 1). Now I'm not sure if this is a problem or normal for your system, but it may be worth looking into. You should be able to find it in the installation manual, or call a local parts house that sells your brand, or as your tech. And if it's just your drain, forget all about the piping I mentioned. Hope this helps!

Mar 08, 2017 | Goodman Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

I have 2goodmanGKS9 gas furnaces(propane) installed on 27 Dec 2009. Both units are working. One is in the basement adjacent to the rear outside wall. Lower unit heats about 1200 square feet. Lower...


well lets start with the 2" pvc pipe. that is a combustion air intake it does not put air into the room, i hope. this is a 90% furnace and they should have installed it that way. there should be 2 pipes to the outside the other is combustion gases. the dust problem maybe caused by the air return pulling the air to that room. the bedroom normaly does not get the trafic that the rest of the condo does.so it would not have as much dust.

Feb 10, 2011 | Goodman Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

My basement has water in it from time to time. I called a service guy out and he said the moisture in my basement is causing my furnace problems. is there anything i can do to correct this problem besides...


if its the furnace condensating it obviously needs a drain some high efficincy heaters need drains as they burn so efficient they sweat and condensate in flu and you need to get rid of this by draining if the furnace has no drain it must by your venting into area causing it condensate in the area furnace in, so you just need fresh air vent in doorway or wall to let more air in, but i reckon its more the draining of the furnace, if the plumber can't stop the moisture coming in, and didn't give you any solutions i hope you didn't pay him to come there for nothing! and if you are not using heater and moisture getting in still this is a drainage problem or water circuit, which is a plumbing problem not your furnace

Nov 23, 2010 | Goodman Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

No matter what setting is put on furnace humidifier, moisture forms on windows.House is only 6 years old and does have a lot of windows.


Hello WPwilkers, Well there's good news and good news!

First off, you should probably use the lowest possible setting as your house being so new, is likely pretty "air-tight" and as such, doesn't have a lot of air infiltration (gaps and drafts) hence the reason you're seeing moisture on the windows.

Now, I would also use a hygrometer, just like your parents likely had hanging on a wall somewhere in their house. It will give you a better idea of the moistur (humidity) around the house. My guess is that you're already at the 60%+ level of humidity.

I suggest that you turn "OFF" the furnace mounted humidifier, until you no longer see moisture on the windows. That will allow the house to adjust and get back to normal humidity levels.

Then you can start by setting the humidifier on the lowest possible setting and keep an eye on the moisture levels in your coldest room of the house, as that is where you'll first notice the excessive moisture on the windows (just the way it works - cold rooms get condensation on the cooler windows first).

If you don't have the humistat (the control for the furnance mounted humidifer) mounted next to your heating and cooling system thermostat, you should do that - it will make it easier to adjust and also will provide a more accurate reading for the humifier to operate properly.

Some Thermostats have the ability to add a humidifier on it for integrated controlling of the furnace humidifer. Check your Thermostat and Furnance owner's manual for details.

I used to have the same problem and found that by moving the humidifer control from the utility room (mine was in the basement of my house) to the living space, it made a big difference. Since most people's homes have unfinished basements and that's where the HVAC system is located, it doesn't get the same humidty readings as an occupied living space.

The other reason that you tend to get moisture (condensation) forming on windows is that the Percentage of humiditfication is set manually with the humidifier control, and yet, the outside (and inside) air temperature vary and the difference between them can cause the humidity levels to go from very dry to very moist, in a day or two.

I tend to wait until I notice that the air inside the house is getting dry and then turn on my humidifier, once the cold winter days have taken hold. In summary, nothing wrong with your unit, just mother nature and a well built (most air-tight) home are giving you higher levels of condensation than most older homes. Gradual adjustments, once you turn the humidifier off for awhile, should get you the desired results.

I hope you find this Very Helpful and best regards!

Dec 17, 2009 | Honeywell HE365 Humidifier

1 Answer

Electric went out the central air is not cold and if you turn off the air the fan is still running


The fan on the outside condensing unit? or the furnace blower fan?

Could be 1 of several causes. Blown fuse in disconnect, stuck contactor in the outside unit electrical box. You should have it checked by a qualified service technician as you can get seriously hurt. If you want a referal, email me your location and I will send you some referals.

Richard Johnson, EMSHVAC, Inc.
rjohnson@emshvac.com

Aug 19, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

Not finding what you are looking for?
Heating & Cooling Logo

Related Topics:

24 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Heating & Cooling Experts

paulcarew

Level 3 Expert

2461 Answers

Dan Webster
Dan Webster

Level 3 Expert

8220 Answers

Donni Steen

Level 3 Expert

659 Answers

Are you a Heating and Cooling Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...