Question about Maytag M6Y18F7A Air Conditioner

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Heat pump ice accumulation and no air flow

My heat pump PSH4BDO36K seams to be operating properly but no air is coming through the vents. There is ice accumulation on the unit, so I turned it off. When the ice melts will the air flow return?

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  • thetim May 11, 2010

    Is your filter dirty inside? how old is the unit? where is the ice accum. at?

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Low on refrigerant is the probable cause

Posted on Sep 17, 2009

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Sounds like it's working but not getting cold enough in freezer or refrigderator


In my experience, the biggest culprit causing these symptoms is the defrost heater. This is a heating device that melts frost off the "evaporator coils" better known as the coils usually located inside the freezer area of the unit. These coils get very cold and warm air that is let inside when any door is open, will carry moisture with it that will accumulate like water on the outside of a cold glass in summer time, only it accumulates on the evaporator coils and turns to frost.

As your fridge cycles through its operating stages, one part of the cycle turns off the cooling and turns on a heating device of varying types to melt the frost and ice off of the evaporator coils so it can drip down and flow through a small hose through an opening in the bottom of the fridge and into a pan underneath the fridge where it evaporates back into the air again.

If the heating device never comes on, or becomes inoperative, the frost will slowly continue to collect on the evaporator coils until it becomes a solid block of ice. This now greatly reduces the ability of the evaporator fan to blow the cold air around the coils throughout the freezer and the rest of the fridge. The ice built up around the evaporator coils will still provide some cold, but will significantly prevent the fridge from operating properly.

Another cause may be the evaporator fan not operating correctly. If it doesn't blow air over the evaporator coils well enough, cold air will not get distributed through out the fridge. Cold air tends to "fall", so the bottom of the freezer will be the coldest. Generally, there is an adjustable hole in "side by side" units so that the amount of air coming through that hole can make the "meat crisper" colder. In fridges where the freezer is on the top, I've seen the evaporator coils (which often incorporate "fins" like those on a car radiator, turn into a solid block of ice.
25823064-nzcmabjorfygbev20le00e4d-4-1.jpg Also check for dust collecting on the condenser coils on the outside of the fridge. These dissipate heat drawn from inside the fridge and take it outside the fridge. These are often located on the back of the fridge or underneath the fridge. Dust and fluff act as insulation and degrade their ability to work properly.

Obviously, to repair the fridge, you should relocate the contents of your unit until you can repair the fridge. Fixing your fridge will take at least a few hours even if you can get your hands on repair parts quickly. This will involve unplugging the unit and locating the items I've referred to. Either allow the accumulated ice to melt naturally or GENTLY speed up the process with a hair dryer or heat gun. Do not use any force removing the accumulated ice and frost, you could easily damage the coils and make things much worse than they already are. Even to the point of making the unit uneconomical to repair.

Without your posting a make, model, type of freezer/fridge arrangement or other details, it is difficult to assist you further. Part placement and component locations vary greatly in this appliance.

Aug 15, 2015 | Refrigerators

Tip

Why your unit is freezing up.


To understand why your AC or heat pump is freezing up, it helps to know how your system works.

There are 7 major parts to an AC system, 9 with a heat pump.

1 - Condenser/heat pump (The outdoor unit)
2 - Air Handler (the indoor unit unless the system is a package unit, then all is outside in one system. The air handler is usually found under the home, in an attic, or in a closet.)

In the condenser are the following major parts.

3 - Compressor
4 - Condenser coil
5 - Condenser fan
6 - (HPs only) reversing valve

In the air handler are the following major parts.

7 - Blower motor
8 - Evaporator coil
9 - (HPs only) electric heat strips

Some systems known as "dual fuel systems" use another heat source in place of the heat strips, usually a gas furnace. I will address gas furnaces in another post.

When an air conditioner is operating properly several things are taking place.

1 - The compressor is compressing or "pumping" refrigerant through the system.

2 - through changes in pressure, the refrigerant makes the evaporator coil get very cold, and the condenser coil gets very hot.

3 - The blower motor/fan circulates air across the evaporator coils, as the room temperature air (Also known as "indoor ambient") goes through the cold coil, it exits, cooled approximately 15 to 20 degrees cooler than when it entered. (In a ducted system, the blower is also the fan that circulates the air throughout the home.)

4 - The condenser fan circulates air across the condenser coils. As the outdoor air goes through the condenser coil, it removes heat from the coils that are very hot. This in turn removes heat from the refrigerant so it can run its cycle again, and through pressure changes, cool the evap coil.

5 - With a heat pump, the reversing valve reverses the flow of refrigerant in the condenser and evaporator coils.
In AC mode, the evaporator coils get cold, and the condenser coils get hot. But in heat mode, the evaporator gets very hot, and the condenser very cold.

Now, whichever coil is getting cold will freeze up if there is inadequate air flow across the coil, as the refrigerant in it is far below freezing, and there is not enough airflow to keep the humidity in the air from freezing on the coil.

Things that can cause poor airflow are,

1 - Dirty/clogged coils
2 - dirty/clogged filter (will only effect evaporator coil)
3 - Closed/blocked vents (will only effect evaporator coil)
4 - Malfunctioning or dirty fan

Low refrigerant will also cause a coil to freeze up, reduce efficiency and cause the system to run for long periods of time. Not to mention, shortening the life of the unit.

With a heat pump, in heat mode only, the condenser (outdoor) coil will routinely begin to freeze up in cold temperatures. This is due to the fact that the refrigerant is below freezing, and the cold outdoor ambient temp is not warm enough to keep the condensation in the air from freezing on the coil.

Note, a properly working AC should never freeze up.

A heat pump is equipped with defrost controls to prevent ice buildup.
Some are controlled by timers, some by temp.

When a HP is going into defrost mode, the condenser fan shuts down, the reversing valve reverses the flow of refrigerant and the once cold condenser coil now gets very hot, defrosting the coil. (Many people have said this process sounds like the unit is coming apart, or about to explode and are frightened by the "smoke" which is really just steam from melting ice that comes off the unit.)

During defrost mode, the secondary or "auxiliary" heat comes on to ensure that you are still getting warm air from the vents. (Again, this can be electric heat strips or a dual fuel system)

If you are experiencing cold air from the vents during defrost, that means your auxiliary heat is malfunctioning.

The auxiliary heat is used for three purposes.

1 - during defrost mode to maintain warm airflow (automatic)
2 - when the HP cannot maintain the set temp due to extreme outdoor temps. It comes on when the indoor temp drops several degrees below the set temp on the thermostat (automatic)
3 - For emergency heat source when the HP is not working. (Manual)

To recap....

Iced up coils?

Poor airflow
low refrigerant
Malfunctioning fan
failing defrost system


There are two things that can be done in a pinch to help de-ice frozen coils. This may get you by until the repairman can get there, or you can fix the system if you are a do-it-yourselfer.

HPs frozen outdoor coil in heat mode, not going into defrost?

Cover most of the vents, and turn the system onto cooling mode until the outdoor coil is thawed. then uncover vents and return to heat, or emergency heat. (this usually takes 15 min or less)

Frozen coils in AC mode with a heat pump?
Turn the system to heat with the thermostat on just high enough to get the system to come on. (again, usually takes 15 min or less to thaw.)

AC only, with frozen evap coils? (this can sometimes be seen frozen all the way outside to the compressor on the copper lines.)

Turn the system off, and the fan switch from "auto" to on".
This will usually defrost the coils within 1 to 2 hours.
(If your system has the furnace in line before the evap coil, turn the system to heat, and the furnace will defrost the coil within minutes.)



on Dec 25, 2008 | Carrier XHB123D X/Y Series Heat/Cool Air...

1 Answer

There is a loud humming coming from outside unit, the fan is not rotating.


Your question does not include what type of system you are asking about, but the assumption is that it is a heat pump. The loud humming is the compressor running by itself while the fan is off.

This is the typical way a reasonably new heat pump operates:
There is a coil temperature sensor that initiates a defrost period to eliminate the frost/ice build up on the outdoor coil. In the defrost mode, the outdoor fan shuts off and the reversing valve in the heat pump reverses the direction of refrigerant flow to warm the outdoor coil. The same coil temperature sensor senses the temperature of the external surface of the coil and tells the defrost control when the frost is gone initiating another 'reverse cycle' to put it back into heating mode. In the heating mode, the outdoor fan runs again.

If you have the heat pump installed where snow drifts accumulate, you will have a problem extracting heat from the outdoor air, and coil frosting and freezing will be exaggerated. If you have excessive ice build up due to a defosting issue, the ice can actually stop the fan from rotating, but you would hear loud bangind and rattling for hours first as the fan blades come in contact with the ice.

If you do not have drifts, but continually have an excessive amount of ice build up, either the sensor is possibly faulty or the defrost control board is faulty. The sensor's clip could easily have been knocked loose from the coil by ice and is no longer sensing coil temperature and if so the result would be the lack of defrost initiation.

Feb 13, 2015 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Hi,My remote do not get the good temp in my house. Ex: I set to 80F in heat mode but the thermopump operate slowly and dosn't get hire than 70-72F. The remote see the unit and all. Is the sensor in th


You have a heat pump.
Once the outdoor temperature falls below 36 degrees, heat pumps will sharply lose their ability to heat.
If you are getting a 72 degree indoor temperature when the outdoor temperature is 28-30 degrees, the heat pump is performing up to spec.
On heat pumps, the air coming out of the nearest air vent to the unit should be heated approximately 40 degrees warmer than the air entering the unit.
If you have a 70 degree indoor air temperature, the heat pump should be supplying 110 degree air at the closest air vent to the indoor unit.
Gas heat is a much better heating source where outside temperatures are commonly below 36 degrees.
Even electric furnaces perform better than heat pumps under these conditions.

Nov 30, 2014 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Little heat coming out of vents.


IF YOU CAN'T FEEL THE AIR FLOW OUT BUT YOU HEAR THE BLOWER MOTOR WORKING, BEHIND THE GLOVE BOX IS A CABIN FILTER.REPLACE FILTER
IF YOU HAVE GOOD AIR FLOW BUT NO HEAT:
1;VACUUM LEAKING TO HEATER CONTROL
2;WATER PUMP GOING BAD / NOT CIRCULATING COOLANT,HIGH RPM/MORE COOLANT TO THE HEATER CORE
3;OPEN THERMOSTAT/ENGINE TEMPERATURE TO LOW
1;CHANGE THE DIRECTION FROM VENTS TO FLOUR TO WINDSHIELD. IF NOTHING HAPPEN IS THE VACUUM
2;RUN THE ENGINE INSIDE ON WARM PLACE ON IDLE.NOTE THE GAUGE IF PAS 1/2 TO 3/4. IF PAS 3/4 MARK REPLACE WATER PUMP
3;IF GAUGE STAY BELOW 1/2 REPLACE THERMOSTAT
GOOD LUCK

Mar 27, 2014 | 2005 Dodge Neon

1 Answer

Dryer will heat up then shut off


Most likely it's getting to hot, check your vent and the outside vent hood make sure you have proper air flow. Turn on the dryer check the vent exit to make sure you feel hot air coming out. Take the vent off and check the back of the dryer for air flow. If you have air flow and the unit is still over heating you may need to replace the operating Thermostat. Could tell you more with a good model number should be inside the door.

I’m happy to help further over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/william_e43a8a4d83a5f604

Oct 26, 2013 | Kenmore 62602 Electric Dryer

2 Answers

Carrier heat pump iceing I replace defrost bord 3 days good works but now iceing again


Air flow

Feb 03, 2013 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

I have a Mitsubishi heat pump that runs well but the outdoor unit does not defrost what could be the problem.


Why does my heat pump ice up in Winter?
Heat pumps naturally ice-up in the winter. It is normal for the entire coil to be covered in a white frost and even light ice, during cold weather conditions. However, it is bad for the entire unit to be encased in ice. This indicates ductless heat pump problems which should be addressed quickly to save energy and avoid serious damage to your ductless unit. These systems should periodically go into a defrost cycle. This keeps the unit running efficiently. If the coils are blocked by ice, proper heat transfer between the coil and the outside air will not occur.
How does the defrost mode work?
When the mini split heat pump goes into defrost, the reversing valve inside of the outdoor unit is energized, switching the system from heat to the air conditioning mode. The outdoor coil becomes the hot, the indoor coil becomes cold, and both - the outdoor and indoor fans shut off. This allows the outdoor coil to melt accumulated ice. When the built-in micro-computer analyzes that all ice have been melted, the heat pump heating system goes back to heating mode.
sanyo-mini-split-defrost.pngA cloud of water vapor may be seen rising over the outdoor unit and a "whoosh" sound can be heard as the refrigerant reverses direction. The entire process usually takes up to 10 minutes (depending on conditions).
How often does the system goes into defrost mode?
Ductless mini-split heat pumps have different ways of determining when to go into defrost. The built-in microcomputer determines outdoor temperature, refrigerant pressures, and several other factors. In colder temperatures the system will go into defrost more often than in warmer.
If a ductless mini split heat pump is severely iced-up in the winter it is possible that it isn't defrosting (though there could be many other causes). Let the manufacturer certified technician check your system

Oct 29, 2011 | Mitsubishi Mr. Slim MXZ30TN Air...

1 Answer

Ruud achiever series "10 seer"


You should see no ice. Turn it off for a while like and hour or so.. Do you feel air coming out of the vents?

Jun 26, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

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