Question about Kellogg's Austin Cheese Crackers with Cheddar Cheese - 7.4 oz. box, 12 per case

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Date codeP06294AN Austin cheese crackers with cheddar

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What is the hard cheese method called?


Harder cheeses have a lower moisture content than softer cheeses. They are generally packed into moulds under more pressure and aged for a longer time than the soft cheeses. Cheeses that are classified as semi-hard to hard include the familiar Cheddar, originating in the village of Cheddar in England but now used as a generic term for this style of cheese, of which varieties are imitated worldwide and are marketed by strength or the length of time they have been aged. Cheddar is one of a family of semi-hard or hard cheeses (including Cheshire and Gloucester), whose curd is cut, gently heated, piled, and stirred before being pressed into forms. Colby and Monterey Jack are similar but milder cheeses; their curd is rinsed before it is pressed, washing away some acidity and calcium. A similar curd-washing takes place when making the Dutch cheeses Edam and Gouda.

Jan 18, 2017 | Cooking

1 Answer

I want to bulk buy a block of cheese mild cheddar from Cosco wholesaaler and would like to know how long it would last in the fridge wrapped up or can freeze it thanks x


it will last indefinitely wrapped properly (saran wrap) in fridge, you might have to cut a little mold off, that's no problem. your problem would be putting cheese in freezer.

Dec 04, 2016 | Refrigerators

1 Answer

What does not go well with cheese


A broad question. Please send more info if you'd like - glad to help. I am posting regardless:

(from website:)
http://www.thekitchn.com/what-not-to-pair-cheese-pairin-148014)

What Not To Pair: Cheese Pairings to Avoid


(We) talk a lot about what makes a great pairing when it comes to cheese, wine, and food. And since cheese is so rarely-- really, too rarely, in our opinion-- enjoyed just entirely on its own, it's especially important to know what foods will heighten your experience of the cheeses you serve.

Equally vital is knowing what not to do. (Oranges and carrots, for example, are just a preview of two things that just won't make your cheese sing.) Here, some don'ts to keep in mind when putting together a cheese plate.

When pairing foods with cheese, your goal should be to highlight both elements equally. Ideally, go for flavors that will accentuate rather than overpower the cheese itself. Similarly, cheeses shouldn't overwhelm what you choose as accompaniments.
The exceptions to the rules below may be fresh cheeses, which act as excellent foils to stronger flavors. But generally speaking, the following things are examples of what to stay away from when constructing a cheese plate with a variety of different styles, ages, and flavors:

Spicy things: There may not be a worse way to kill the flavors of your cheese. While a searingly spicy hot pepper jelly is actually great with a cooling, sprightly puck of goat cheese (see above disclaimer regarding the fresh cheese exception), it wouldn't do anything for the subtle flavors of a semi-soft, natural rinded sheep milk cheese, for example. Veer from olive mixes speckled with dried red pepper flakes, really spicy pickled items, spicy meats, hot jellies, mustards, or chutneys, and even crackers with black peppercorns. While delicious, these accompaniments will linger on your palate and hinder your experience of the cheese in its natural state. Lightly spiced things can be great with cheese, liked sweet, spiced nuts and herbaceous olives. But beware of things that taste more of what was used for flavoring than of the food itself!

Garlic- or Onion-flavored Crackers and Bread: Unless you want to be left tasting the bits of dehydrated onion or garlic that so often sully the surface of breads and crackers, save these items for other moments. And beware of the "Everything" flavor, too, which may have lots of onion and garlic lurking within. Some cheeses, like stronger mountain cheeses and some funky natural rinded wheels, actually have subtle notes of spring garlic or onion. Breads and crackers infused with onion-y flavors can mar these compelling undertones, so beware.

Vegetables: Clearly this is a category that may be a bit too large to generalize, so to be more specific, stick with vegetables that have relatively mild flavors, like sliced fennel and endive spears. Slightly peppery greens like arugula or radicchio can be great compliments to cheese if you're thinking of making a cheese-laced salad. But on a cheese platter, stay away from the most vegetal of vegetables, like broccoli, carrots, green beans, celery, and cauliflower. While these all may make great additions to a crudite platter (and broccoli and cheddar soup is undeniably delicious), they seem straight-up strange to pair raw with nice cheeses.

Citrus or high-acid fruits: Orange segments, grapefruit, kiwi, and pineapple have their place, but not on a cheese plate. While so many different kinds of fruits go seamlessly with cheese-- like apples, pears, grapes, and figs, not to mention all of the dried fruit that compliments cheese so well-- those fruits that are higher in acid tend to turn cheese acrid. My mouth nearly cringes with the thought of the curdling effect these fruits would have on cheese!

Tannic Red Wines are similar to citrus in their ability to turn cheeses bitter. The lingering effect of tannin on cheese can be so negative, you may walk away with an inaccurate opinion of what you're tasting. You'll ruin not only your impression of the cheese, but of the wine, too!

- - - -

On a final note:
What do you call cheese that 'isn't yours'?

Give up?
"NACHO cheese"
:)


Jul 11, 2014 | Games

1 Answer

How many ounces needed do I need to make 1/2 pound ?


1/2 lb of cheese is about 227 grams of cheese.

Apr 25, 2014 | Office Equipment & Supplies

1 Answer

Can you freeze cheddar cheese?


https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=freeze+cheese

Nov 05, 2013 | Cooking

2 Answers

I have lactose intolerance. Which dairy products can I consume?


When you're lactose intolerant, you may cringe at the thought of eating dairy products.
But there's really no need. In this day and age, there are plenty of nutrient-rich dairy products you can enjoy, without suffering the all-too-familiar consequences. Those may be Yogurt, Aged cheeses, Low-fat dairy products in small amounts, Lactase-fortified dairy products, Dairy products eaten with a lactase pill, ..
To know how to treat it, see at:
Home Remedies for Lactose Intolerance Authority Remedies
lactose-intolerance-dairy-products-m2ksmnypn3q4fwum3pjpeotr-4-0.jpg

Feb 04, 2013 | Cooking

2 Answers

I have a cheese dispenser from AFP Dispensers, Model is Sierra and I do not know how to work it. PLus I need to know what types of cheese it dispenses.


Hi there. It dispenses nacho cheese sauce.. you can call your local rep. to order and get particulars. contact your local AFP sales representative for details, or call 866-239-8475

Aug 06, 2009 | Kitchen Appliances - Others

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