Question about Jamis Durango 2.0

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What size chain do i need for this bike

I bought a chain with a master link and replaced the old chain but now the chain won't mesh with the sprocket consistantly.

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  • 40 Answers

Why don't you just take off the old chain and take it with you to the bike store, since you have to return your new chain anyway and buy a new one. You don't even need to know the size, because they will match the old chain with the new chain. No guesswork required.

Posted on May 10, 2014

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Bike chain broken, how to fix this?


Sometimes all it takes is a master link or "quick link," but you can't count on that. How to fix it depends on several factors. There are different chains for the various number of cogs/gears on the rear of the bike, and an older chain may require a different procedure than a newer one. Further, if the chain is badly worn it may need to be replaced, but then may not mesh well if the gears aren't replaced as well. Finally, just taking out the rest of the link (one full link is one outer and one inner) may make the chain too short, which could damage the bike.

It's best to take the chain and bike into a bike shop, or a bike co-op if there's one available. If you really want to know all the in's and out's see this link: Chain Maintenance

Oct 31, 2016 | Cycling

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I need to know the size of the center hole on a 19 tooth transmission sprocket for an apc mini chopper Thanks


Why do you need to know the size of the centre hole. That one look in great condition. The size is the size of the shaft it fits on, so you measure the narrower distance, which is between the sprocket tooth that is under the middle of your thumb nail, to the second tooth past your index finger. All this links have info.

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  • Apr 08, 2016 | APC Motorcycles

    1 Answer

    Heyy I have a problem with my kawasaki kx 85. I replaced the front+ rear sprockets and drive chain but didn't leave enough slack so when I started the bike It drove fine in 1st then I put it in 2nd and the...


    The chain and the engine starting sound like two different problems. So we'll deal with the chain first. You can add a couple linksof chain using a master link to the chain which you can pick up at just about any hardware store for cheap money. Just bring your chain with you so you get the right size links. Next time if/when you order a chain (maybe you were planning on using the old chain?) you usually order the chain a little bigger and you can cut off any extra links to make the chain fit better. On most bikes there is some adjustment to slide the tire either forward or back to make the chain fit properly. Is you tire moved all the way forward? Lots of questions about the engine that you didn't mention. Does the piston move freely or is it seized? Maybe needs a new spark plug? They can get fouled on 2 strokes especially if you have a load on the engine because your chain is too tight. FIx the chain issue, then go through the usual checks of the engine...Is it getting fuel, Spark, Air, etc

    Nov 01, 2014 | Motorcycles

    2 Answers

    Adjust primary chain on 2000 fatboy


    hi,

    Sooner or later, every bike will need a new chain and sprockets. Once a chain begins to wear, its pitch changes and wears the sprocket teeth. Then the chain begins to wear even faster. Then it's time for a new chain, and a new pair of sprockets.
    The rear wheel on my motorcycle had been misaligned (I had used the inaccurate etched indicators on the swingarm-rather than a ruler against the sprocket-to set wheel alignment) and ridden hard through a gritty, salty winter. The rear sprocket was in rough shape, and the chain was making lots of popping sounds as the bike went down the road.
    Changing a chain is a fairly basic job that requires a chain breaker / riveting tool and whatever is needed to remove the rear wheel and sprockets. It's nice to have a blow torch and a torque wrench on hand for this job, too.
    The ingenious Terra-X chain tool is made in Australia out of tool steel, and weighs just 150 grams. A big hollow bolt threads into the bigger of the two holes, and is used when pressing outer plates onto new master links. A smaller bolt with a pin can thread into the hollow bolt, and is used to push link pins out of old chains or to peen new master link pins by pushing them against a grub screw threaded into the steel body's other hole. That little grub screw with a rounded steel end screws into the smaller hole of the chain breaker. It fits into and peens the hole of the new master link.
    When changing a chain, the first step is to loosen the bolts on the front sprocket. It's good to get those loose while the chain is still on the bike, partly to avoid putting undue stress on the transmission, and partly to avoid getting deep into the job and finding that the front sprocket bolts are stuck. In this case, the small allen bolts needed a bit of heat to come undone.
    After the bolts are loose, it's time to break the chain. With the Terra-X chain tool, you remove the small grub screw and use the small bolt with the pin to push out one of the chain's pins. No grunting or swearing required.
    Then comes sprocket replacement. Six nuts on the rear sprocket, the two bolts on the front sprocket, and that step is done. I had a torque wrench handy, so I could get the torque values just right when putting everything back together.
    The next step is the big one: installing the master link that joins the ends of the new chain together. The master link comes with a little bag with some X-Rings, a master link, and some sticky tan lube. Smear the lube on the pins and inside the X-Rings, then begin to assemble the master link around the two ends of the chain, making sure to get the X-Rings in the right spots.
    Pressing the outer plate onto the master link is the hardest part of the job. I removed the pin bolt from the Terra-X tool and used the hollow bolt to push the outer plate onto the master link's pins. It took a few tries, but eventually I got it in the correct position.
    After the sprockets are on and the master link is in position, the master link's pins need to be peened. With the Terra-X, the pin bolt pushes the master link pin against the grub screw's steel ball, and flares the pin. It takes a lot of effort-mostly because it's not easy to get a lot of leverage on tools when they're underneath a motorcycle.
    Position the wheel for proper chain tension, torque everything to the correct specs, and you're back on the road. The new chain is smooth, nearly silent, and ready for thousands of miles of high-speed running.


    adjust-primary-chain-2000-fatboy-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-3-0.jpg

    adjust-primary-chain-2000-fatboy-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-3-2.jpg

    adjust-primary-chain-2000-fatboy-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-3-5.jpg

    Oct 07, 2014 | 2003 Harley Davidson FLSTFI Fat Boy

    2 Answers

    2000 flstc how to adjust primary chain ?


    hi,

    Sooner or later, every bike will need a new chain and sprockets. Once a chain begins to wear, its pitch changes and wears the sprocket teeth. Then the chain begins to wear even faster. Then it's time for a new chain, and a new pair of sprockets.
    The rear wheel on my motorcycle had been misaligned (I had used the inaccurate etched indicators on the swingarm-rather than a ruler against the sprocket-to set wheel alignment) and ridden hard through a gritty, salty winter. The rear sprocket was in rough shape, and the chain was making lots of popping sounds as the bike went down the road.
    Changing a chain is a fairly basic job that requires a chain breaker / riveting tool and whatever is needed to remove the rear wheel and sprockets. It's nice to have a blow torch and a torque wrench on hand for this job, too.
    The ingenious Terra-X chain tool is made in Australia out of tool steel, and weighs just 150 grams. A big hollow bolt threads into the bigger of the two holes, and is used when pressing outer plates onto new master links. A smaller bolt with a pin can thread into the hollow bolt, and is used to push link pins out of old chains or to peen new master link pins by pushing them against a grub screw threaded into the steel body's other hole. That little grub screw with a rounded steel end screws into the smaller hole of the chain breaker. It fits into and peens the hole of the new master link.
    When changing a chain, the first step is to loosen the bolts on the front sprocket. It's good to get those loose while the chain is still on the bike, partly to avoid putting undue stress on the transmission, and partly to avoid getting deep into the job and finding that the front sprocket bolts are stuck. In this case, the small allen bolts needed a bit of heat to come undone.
    After the bolts are loose, it's time to break the chain. With the Terra-X chain tool, you remove the small grub screw and use the small bolt with the pin to push out one of the chain's pins. No grunting or swearing required.
    Then comes sprocket replacement. Six nuts on the rear sprocket, the two bolts on the front sprocket, and that step is done. I had a torque wrench handy, so I could get the torque values just right when putting everything back together.
    The next step is the big one: installing the master link that joins the ends of the new chain together. The master link comes with a little bag with some X-Rings, a master link, and some sticky tan lube. Smear the lube on the pins and inside the X-Rings, then begin to assemble the master link around the two ends of the chain, making sure to get the X-Rings in the right spots.
    Pressing the outer plate onto the master link is the hardest part of the job. I removed the pin bolt from the Terra-X tool and used the hollow bolt to push the outer plate onto the master link's pins. It took a few tries, but eventually I got it in the correct position.
    After the sprockets are on and the master link is in position, the master link's pins need to be peened. With the Terra-X, the pin bolt pushes the master link pin against the grub screw's steel ball, and flares the pin. It takes a lot of effort-mostly because it's not easy to get a lot of leverage on tools when they're underneath a motorcycle.
    Position the wheel for proper chain tension, torque everything to the correct specs, and you're back on the road. The new chain is smooth, nearly silent, and ready for thousands of miles of high-speed running.

    2000-flstc-adjust-primary-chain-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-4-0.jpg

    2000-flstc-adjust-primary-chain-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-4-2.jpg

    2000-flstc-adjust-primary-chain-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-4-5.jpg

    Jun 23, 2012 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLSTC Heritage...

    2 Answers

    Do you have any idea how to check the chain adjustment on a 2002 Dyna Low


    hi,

    Sooner or later, every bike will need a new chain and sprockets. Once a chain begins to wear, its pitch changes and wears the sprocket teeth. Then the chain begins to wear even faster. Then it's time for a new chain, and a new pair of sprockets.
    The rear wheel on my motorcycle had been misaligned (I had used the inaccurate etched indicators on the swingarm-rather than a ruler against the sprocket-to set wheel alignment) and ridden hard through a gritty, salty winter. The rear sprocket was in rough shape, and the chain was making lots of popping sounds as the bike went down the road.
    Changing a chain is a fairly basic job that requires a chain breaker / riveting tool and whatever is needed to remove the rear wheel and sprockets. It's nice to have a blow torch and a torque wrench on hand for this job, too.
    The ingenious Terra-X chain tool is made in Australia out of tool steel, and weighs just 150 grams. A big hollow bolt threads into the bigger of the two holes, and is used when pressing outer plates onto new master links. A smaller bolt with a pin can thread into the hollow bolt, and is used to push link pins out of old chains or to peen new master link pins by pushing them against a grub screw threaded into the steel body's other hole. That little grub screw with a rounded steel end screws into the smaller hole of the chain breaker. It fits into and peens the hole of the new master link.
    When changing a chain, the first step is to loosen the bolts on the front sprocket. It's good to get those loose while the chain is still on the bike, partly to avoid putting undue stress on the transmission, and partly to avoid getting deep into the job and finding that the front sprocket bolts are stuck. In this case, the small allen bolts needed a bit of heat to come undone.
    After the bolts are loose, it's time to break the chain. With the Terra-X chain tool, you remove the small grub screw and use the small bolt with the pin to push out one of the chain's pins. No grunting or swearing required.
    Then comes sprocket replacement. Six nuts on the rear sprocket, the two bolts on the front sprocket, and that step is done. I had a torque wrench handy, so I could get the torque values just right when putting everything back together.
    The next step is the big one: installing the master link that joins the ends of the new chain together. The master link comes with a little bag with some X-Rings, a master link, and some sticky tan lube. Smear the lube on the pins and inside the X-Rings, then begin to assemble the master link around the two ends of the chain, making sure to get the X-Rings in the right spots.
    Pressing the outer plate onto the master link is the hardest part of the job. I removed the pin bolt from the Terra-X tool and used the hollow bolt to push the outer plate onto the master link's pins. It took a few tries, but eventually I got it in the correct position.
    After the sprockets are on and the master link is in position, the master link's pins need to be peened. With the Terra-X, the pin bolt pushes the master link pin against the grub screw's steel ball, and flares the pin. It takes a lot of effort-mostly because it's not easy to get a lot of leverage on tools when they're underneath a motorcycle.
    Position the wheel for proper chain tension, torque everything to the correct specs, and you're back on the road. The new chain is smooth, nearly silent, and ready for thousands of miles of high-speed running.

    any-idea-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-5-0.jpg

    any-idea-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-5-2.jpg

    any-idea-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-5-4.jpg

    any-idea-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-5-7.jpg

    May 14, 2011 | 2000 Harley Davidson FXDWG Dyna Wide Glide

    1 Answer

    Chain broke and the new one wont quite fit how do i adjust the back wheel to make it fit, do I have to loosen the big lug b4 adjusting the screws


    The large axle bolt holds the wheel in place. The adjusters are only used for setting the position of the wheel , mainly for chain and sprocket alignment. First remove the cotter pin and loosen the large nut on the axle bolt. Now you can loosen the adjuster bolts and slide the wheel forward. If you have the correct length chain for the sprockets every thing should fit perfectly. When you unhook the old master link do not remove the chain. Hook the new chain to the old chain using the old master link ( do not lock it on) just use it to pull the chain around the front sprocket. This will save you having to take off the front sprocket cover. I usually find it helpful to count the links on the old chain and lay the chains side by side to make sure the new chain does not get cut too short. If the chain is too short , you may have to get another master link and add some chain back in to get the correct length. Hope this helps.

    Jul 07, 2010 | Honda CB 100 Motorcycles

    2 Answers

    How to change primary chain tension on 2007 Harley Dyna Low Rider


    hi,

    Sooner or later, every bike will need a new chain and sprockets. Once a chain begins to wear, its pitch changes and wears the sprocket teeth. Then the chain begins to wear even faster. Then it's time for a new chain, and a new pair of sprockets.
    The rear wheel on my motorcycle had been misaligned (I had used the inaccurate etched indicators on the swingarm-rather than a ruler against the sprocket-to set wheel alignment) and ridden hard through a gritty, salty winter. The rear sprocket was in rough shape, and the chain was making lots of popping sounds as the bike went down the road.
    Changing a chain is a fairly basic job that requires a chain breaker / riveting tool and whatever is needed to remove the rear wheel and sprockets. It's nice to have a blow torch and a torque wrench on hand for this job, too.
    The ingenious Terra-X chain tool is made in Australia out of tool steel, and weighs just 150 grams. A big hollow bolt threads into the bigger of the two holes, and is used when pressing outer plates onto new master links. A smaller bolt with a pin can thread into the hollow bolt, and is used to push link pins out of old chains or to peen new master link pins by pushing them against a grub screw threaded into the steel body's other hole. That little grub screw with a rounded steel end screws into the smaller hole of the chain breaker. It fits into and peens the hole of the new master link.
    When changing a chain, the first step is to loosen the bolts on the front sprocket. It's good to get those loose while the chain is still on the bike, partly to avoid putting undue stress on the transmission, and partly to avoid getting deep into the job and finding that the front sprocket bolts are stuck. In this case, the small allen bolts needed a bit of heat to come undone.
    After the bolts are loose, it's time to break the chain. With the Terra-X chain tool, you remove the small grub screw and use the small bolt with the pin to push out one of the chain's pins. No grunting or swearing required.
    Then comes sprocket replacement. Six nuts on the rear sprocket, the two bolts on the front sprocket, and that step is done. I had a torque wrench handy, so I could get the torque values just right when putting everything back together.
    The next step is the big one: installing the master link that joins the ends of the new chain together. The master link comes with a little bag with some X-Rings, a master link, and some sticky tan lube. Smear the lube on the pins and inside the X-Rings, then begin to assemble the master link around the two ends of the chain, making sure to get the X-Rings in the right spots.
    Pressing the outer plate onto the master link is the hardest part of the job. I removed the pin bolt from the Terra-X tool and used the hollow bolt to push the outer plate onto the master link's pins. It took a few tries, but eventually I got it in the correct position.
    After the sprockets are on and the master link is in position, the master link's pins need to be peened. With the Terra-X, the pin bolt pushes the master link pin against the grub screw's steel ball, and flares the pin. It takes a lot of effort-mostly because it's not easy to get a lot of leverage on tools when they're underneath a motorcycle.
    Position the wheel for proper chain tension, torque everything to the correct specs, and you're back on the road. The new chain is smooth, nearly silent, and ready for thousands of miles of high-speed running.

    change-primary-chain-tension-2007-harley-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-5-0.jpg

    change-primary-chain-tension-2007-harley-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-5-2.jpg

    change-primary-chain-tension-2007-harley-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-5-5.jpg

    Mar 22, 2010 | Harley Davidson FXDL Dyna Low Rider...

    1 Answer

    How to replace chain and front sprocket on a 2005 yamaha r1.


    This is just a guese ive never worked on a R1 but most bikes are similar with chains.

    Firstly to loosen the axel and the chain tightners and pull the wheel as far foward as you can. then to find the master link in the chain its a funny looking link with a clip on it, it might not have one if its a compressed link chain, but for this sake lets hope you have it, when you find it use some needle nose pliars and take the clip off and then pull the link outwards it will come off like a washer and push the other side out, theres the chain broken so it can come off, its its a new chain your installing you could cut the old chain off with a hack saw or grind on one of the links. as long as the new chain comes as one long peice not a circle with no master link.

    to get the sprocket off the front find where the chain goes too and un bolt the cover for it it should not be water tight. then the sprocket will have a Circlip or a bolt on it, if its a circlip get a flat screw driver in the space and turn or use the right tool. if its a bolt nock it in gear and try to undo it with a ratchet if it just turns the engine you will need to undo the timing plug on one side of the engine and put a ratchet on the flywheel while un bolting the sprocket you could also do this while the chain is on the bike and put the rear brakes on and un bolt the sprocket, this will stretch the chain but your changing it anyway.

    new sprocket is same way just slide it on and clip or bolt get your chain all the way around all sprockets and the master link will probly be an O-Ring chain, if so you need some vice grips and a 8 or 10mm nut or a 1/4 american nut and you put the rubbers on either side and the plate
    and put the nut over the link heads and clamp down til the clip slots are showing do this to both sides of the link. then put your clip on with needle nose pliars and pull the wheel back with the chain tensioners and tighten your axel
    you want a bit of play with your chain so it can stretch when you sit on the bike, you will need to tighen it for a few hundred miles dayly while the chain stretchs and wears in.

    if you need any more assistance email me ( Skuly@hotmail.com )

    Feb 16, 2010 | 2005 Yamaha YZF-R1

    2 Answers

    How to install hd self adjusting primary chain tensioner in O4 Ultra.



    Sooner or later, every bike will need a new chain and sprockets. Once a chain begins to wear, its pitch changes and wears the sprocket teeth. Then the chain begins to wear even faster. Then it's time for a new chain, and a new pair of sprockets.
    The rear wheel on my motorcycle had been misaligned (I had used the inaccurate etched indicators on the swingarm-rather than a ruler against the sprocket-to set wheel alignment) and ridden hard through a gritty, salty winter. The rear sprocket was in rough shape, and the chain was making lots of popping sounds as the bike went down the road.
    Changing a chain is a fairly basic job that requires a chain breaker / riveting tool and whatever is needed to remove the rear wheel and sprockets. It's nice to have a blow torch and a torque wrench on hand for this job, too.
    The ingenious Terra-X chain tool is made in Australia out of tool steel, and weighs just 150 grams. A big hollow bolt threads into the bigger of the two holes, and is used when pressing outer plates onto new master links. A smaller bolt with a pin can thread into the hollow bolt, and is used to push link pins out of old chains or to peen new master link pins by pushing them against a grub screw threaded into the steel body's other hole. That little grub screw with a rounded steel end screws into the smaller hole of the chain breaker. It fits into and peens the hole of the new master link.
    When changing a chain, the first step is to loosen the bolts on the front sprocket. It's good to get those loose while the chain is still on the bike, partly to avoid putting undue stress on the transmission, and partly to avoid getting deep into the job and finding that the front sprocket bolts are stuck. In this case, the small allen bolts needed a bit of heat to come undone.
    After the bolts are loose, it's time to break the chain. With the Terra-X chain tool, you remove the small grub screw and use the small bolt with the pin to push out one of the chain's pins. No grunting or swearing required.
    Then comes sprocket replacement. Six nuts on the rear sprocket, the two bolts on the front sprocket, and that step is done. I had a torque wrench handy, so I could get the torque values just right when putting everything back together.
    The next step is the big one: installing the master link that joins the ends of the new chain together. The master link comes with a little bag with some X-Rings, a master link, and some sticky tan lube. Smear the lube on the pins and inside the X-Rings, then begin to assemble the master link around the two ends of the chain, making sure to get the X-Rings in the right spots.
    Pressing the outer plate onto the master link is the hardest part of the job. I removed the pin bolt from the Terra-X tool and used the hollow bolt to push the outer plate onto the master link's pins. It took a few tries, but eventually I got it in the correct position.
    After the sprockets are on and the master link is in position, the master link's pins need to be peened. With the Terra-X, the pin bolt pushes the master link pin against the grub screw's steel ball, and flares the pin. It takes a lot of effort-mostly because it's not easy to get a lot of leverage on tools when they're underneath a motorcycle.
    Position the wheel for proper chain tension, torque everything to the correct specs, and you're back on the road. The new chain is smooth, nearly silent, and ready for thousands of miles of high-speed running.


    install-hd-self-adjusting-primary-chain-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-3-0.jpg

    install-hd-self-adjusting-primary-chain-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-3-1.jpg

    Mar 30, 2009 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

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