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What is the best setting to take a picture of the moon

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Without knowing the make and model of your camera I can't give you a definitive answer, but with most cameras you'll want to set it to manual and pretend you're shooting landscapes under a midday sun.

Camera exposure meters are designed to render the entire scene an average gray. Since most of your picture will likely be a dark sky, the camera will try to expose long enough to bring up the sky to an average gray, making the moon into a featureless white blob. Since you probably want to see the moon and don't care if the sky goes black, you want to expose for the moon.

The moon is just a big rock under a bright sun. There is an old rule for taking pictures under a bright sun called the "Sunny-16 Rule." This rule basically states that the proper exposure under this condition is an aperture of f/16 with a shutter speed of 1/ISO. So, if your camera is set to ISO of 200 then you set the aperture to f/16 and the shutter speed to 1/200 seconds, or any equivalent exposure such as f/11 and 1/400.

Digital cameras make this easier, since you can see the picture and adjust the exposure if it didn't come out right. Take a picture, zoom in on the moon, and see if you can see any details. Use the histogram if available. If the peak is at the right edge of the histogram then you're overexposing---reduce the exposure. You want the peak near the right edge but not touching it.

All this depends on the make and model of your camera. Many point&shoot cameras don't have a manual setting. In that case you're pretty much out of luck and you won't get a good picture of the moon.

Posted on May 09, 2014

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SOURCE: fuji s700 taking good moon shots

shutter speed 50 to 80 ISO at 64 get your apature as small as it will go lagest f number set your focus to single point and single focus if you feel comfortable useing manual focus it is better but my manual focus stopped working here is the link to one of my moon shots on flickr

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2516/3966267384_90afc0b269.jpg

Posted on Oct 06, 2009

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How to shoot pictures of the moon


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4 days ago - Taking pictures of the moon is one of the more popular subjects in night photography - but it's also quite tricky to get right. Use this tried and ...

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Jun 11, 2015 - Aperture: Set your aperture to f/11. Shutter Speed: Set your shutter speed to 1/125 on cameras with base ISO 100, and to 1/250 on Nikon DSLRs with base ISO 200. Lens Focus: Set your lens to manual focus (either through a switch on the lens or on the camera) and set your focus to infinity.

How To Take Stunning Pictures Of The (Super) Moon :: Digital Photo ...

www.digital-photo-secrets.com/tip/779/how-to-take-stunning-pictures-of-the-moon/
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Aug 7, 2014 - Start with ISO 200, f11 aperture and 1/125 second. Try a test shot. Then use trial and error by changing the shutter speed until you can find the best exposure that works for your composition without overexposing the moon. Turn off auto focus.

How-To: Photograph The Moon ' Popular Photography

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How to shoot pictures of the moon Google Search

Nov 15, 2016 | Cameras

1 Answer

Shoot pictures of the moon best setting for that


Hi. I would recommend first you use a tripod or some stable support, second the best settings would be Aperture priority and use something in the region of f56-f8 or Manual and set f5.6-f8 and use the exposure indicator to adjust the shutter speed, use the spot meter function on the camera if you have it and vary the exposure by shooting at the recommended exposure and also by shooting overexposed and underexposed. Trial and error is really the only way to go.Set the ISO to 100 or 200 to get the best resolution as you will probably have to zoom it up to 200% on your computer screen to have a good image.

Apr 15, 2014 | Canon PowerShot SD1200 IS / Digital IXUS...

1 Answer

Moon pic


A digital P&S like the PowerShot A1100S is not exactly the best equipment for moon pics. But, mount the camera on a solid tripod, zoom the lens out as far as it will go, set your ISO to 1600, use spot metering on the moon, and utilize your exposure compensation in 1/3 stops to the fullest each way. Use the self-timer set for 2-seconds to avoid camera movement when you push the shutter button. Good luck!

Jun 21, 2013 | Canon PowerShot Cameras

2 Answers

I would like to be able to take a good picture of a full moon on a clear night.


You're going to face two separate problems here.

One, the moon occupies a rather small portion of the night sky. Even fully zoomed in, the moon is going to be not much more than a bright spot in the sky.

Two, the camera is designed to assume that almost every scene is an average brightness. Given how much of the scene is a black sky, the camera will attempt to render the sky as average (what photographers call a "medium gray"). This will result in a picture with a gray sky and a featureless white blob for the moon.

If you think about it, the full moon is nothing more than a really big rock under a midday sun. Thus what you want is the same exposure as when taking a picture on a clear sunny day. Unfortunately the camera is going to be fooled by all that dark sky and try to compensate for it. What you really need is to be able to bypass the camera's light meter and set the proper exposure yourself. The C195, unlike more sophisticated cameras, doesn't allow you to do so. Sorry, but that's just the way it is.

Mar 24, 2013 | Kodak C195 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Can I take clear good pictures of a full moon on a clear night?


You're going to face two separate problems here.

One, the moon occupies a rather small portion of the night sky. Even fully zoomed in, the moon is going to be not much more than a bright spot in the sky.

Two, the camera is designed to assume that almost every scene is an average brightness. Given how much of the scene is a black sky, the camera will attempt to render the sky as average (what photographers call a "medium gray"). This will result in a picture with a gray sky and a featureless white blob for the moon.

If you think about it, the full moon is nothing more than a really big rock under a midday sun. Thus what you want is the same exposure as when taking a picture on a clear sunny day. Unfortunately the camera is going to be fooled by all that dark sky and try to compensate for it. What you really need is to be able to bypass the camera's light meter and set the proper exposure yourself. The C195, unlike more sophisticated cameras, doesn't allow you to do so. Sorry, but that's just the way it is.

Mar 24, 2013 | Kodak Easyshare C195 14 Mega Pixels...

1 Answer

How do I set the settings to take a night moon shot?


Assuming you mean pictures of the moon itself and not a night shot with the moon in it, set your camera to the manual exposure mode and ignore the light meter.

There's an old rule-of-thumb called the "Sunny Sixteen Rule." This states that the proper exposure under a midday sun is an aperture of f/16 and a shutter speed of 1 over the ISO. For example with an ISO 200 film or a digital sensor set at ISO 200 the proper exposure is f/16 and 1/200 second.

What does this have to do with night shots of the moon? Well, the moon is simply a large piece of rock under a cloudless midday sun. Thus the Sunny Sixteen Rule gives you a starting point for the exposure. You can then refine it by reviewing the picture on the LCD and looking at the histogram. The sky will go completely black and you won't see any stars, but you should be able to see at least some of the features of the lunar landscape.

Aug 31, 2012 | FujiFilm FinePix S2940 18X Ultra Zoom 14MP...

1 Answer

How do i take picture of the moon


I assume you want a picture of the moon and don't particularly care what the sky looks like.
Consider a full moon. Just what are you taking a picture of? It's a landscape, right? Mountains, craters, etc. All under a bright midday sun without a cloud in the sky (the sky on the moon, not your sky). So what if the moon's a quarter of a million miles away from you, it's under the same sun. Yeah, it's a quarter of a million miles farther from the sun, but given the nearly one hundred million miles between the earth and the sun, the difference is negligible.
There's an old photography rule called the "Sunny-16 Rule." It says that the proper exposure under sunny conditions is f/16 at a shutter speed that is a reciprocal of the film's ISO rating. So, at ISO 200 the proper exposure would be f/16 at 1/200 second (or equivalent, such as f/11 at 1/400 second). You'll have to switch the camera to the Manual exposure mode to do this. Ignore anything the camera's light meter says.
Use this as a starting guideline. Take a picture and review it on the screen. Don't worry about the sky going pure black. You don't want the highlights to get blown out, or the moon will look like a white blob.

Feb 07, 2012 | Canon EOS 40D Digital SLR Camera Digital...

1 Answer

I live in the Florida Keys and going to try and take some photos of the supper moon tonight. What settings do you suggest for a Sony SLT-A55V. I tried to use my longer lens last night without a tripod...


Take you camera off the automatic exposure setting. Left to itself, the camera will try to make the black sky a middle gray. You want to treat the moon as a landscape under noon sun. If you think about it, that's all it is. The moon is simply a large rock or mountain, lit by the same sun you get at noon. This is where the "Sunny-16" rule comes in. The proper exposure for a full moon is an aperture of f/16 and a shutter speed of 1/ISO. For example, if your ISO is set for 200, the shutter speed should be about 1/200 second. Any equivalent exposure will work as well, for example f/11 at 1/400. You can then review the picture on your display and adjust accordingly. The sky will go pure black, but that's okay. You're not taking a picture of the sky, but of the moon.

Mar 20, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

Fuji s700 taking good moon shots


shutter speed 50 to 80 ISO at 64 get your apature as small as it will go lagest f number set your focus to single point and single focus if you feel comfortable useing manual focus it is better but my manual focus stopped working here is the link to one of my moon shots on flickr

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2516/3966267384_90afc0b269.jpg

Jun 23, 2008 | Fuji FinePix S700 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Trouble with Fossil ME1014


I looked at a picture of the watch. I see the date. the dial that is right below the hands is a moon dial which does the phases of the moon & below that you have a separate second hand. A lot of times on a watch that looks like that if you pull the crown where you set the watch with out half a click it will set the date if you turn it on way and the moon dial if you turn it the other way. To set the moon dial on the watch you need to put it on the full moon when the moon is full again then it will keep up with the phases of the moon. I hope this helps.

Mar 09, 2008 | Watches

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