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Removing stem on quartz movement G10.211-n4 - Watches

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: Removing the crown/stem of CASIO EF-321

Other case for a simple Casio quartz watch :

ef77e0e.jpg

Posted on Jan 08, 2010

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I have a FOSSIL mens wristwatch model # AM3423. I recently had a watch repair person replace the battery. Battery type and charge confirmed. I received the watch used as a gift from a relative who was...


Quartz watches stop working most often for one of three reasons: (1) dead battery; (2) dirt in the gears blocking the train; and (3) a bad crystal. This is the order in which I typically troubleshoot watches.

If the watch isn't working after you change the battery, first check to see that the stem is fully pushed in. A watch movement can shift just enough inside the case that a stem sometimes looks pushed in, but isn't quite in far enough to re-engage the movement. Pull out and push in the stem a few times to see if that changes anything.

Next, assuming that the battery is indeed fine, look closely at the second hand. Is it moving at all, even a tiny bit? Hold the watch up to your ear. Is there any kind of "chunk" sound about once every second? If you can answer "yes" to either of these questions, a speck of dirt has gotten into the movement and is preventing the gears from moving freely. It doesn't take more than a a big spec of dust to cause this. Sometimes, advancing the time will move the gears enough to cause the dirt to fall out. Some watch repair places also have a special machine that spins the hands rapidly to blow out or compact any dirt in the train. It's usually not economically rational to have the movement professionally cleaned beyond this point.

Finally, if you don't hear anything coming from your watch, the battery is good, and the setting stem is pushed firmly and completely into the watch movement, you may have a bad quartz timing crystal. It does happen, and when it does, the only repair is to replace the entire watch movement. Sometimes, that's affordable; sometimes, it just doesn't make sense.

Good luck!

Sep 20, 2012 | Fossil AM3424 Wrist Watch

1 Answer

My watch keeps stoping but my battery is new


If your watch keeps time for a while, then stops and starts erratically, you most likely have one of several common problems.
1. You might have a bad battery. Sounds silly, but watch batteries have a limited shelf life, and if you installed a battery that's already been in a blister pack for a few years, the battery itself could be the problem.
2. Your "set stem" is not completely pushed in. Quartz watches are designed to stop ticking when the set stem is pulled out. They'll start up again when you push the stem completely in. There's a little finger or spring-loaded prong to keep the stem in or out. Sometimes, that little prong can break off from natural use. When that happens, the stem will work itself out enough to stop the watch from ticking. Natural movement on your hand will push it back in, and the movement will take off again. Check to see that you feel a firm "click" when you push the stem all the way in. Sometimes, when changing a battery, the movement will shift inside the case just enough that the stem doesn't quite catch in the locked, "full-in" position.
3. Your battery has a bad connection. Make sure that the positive and negative terminals of the battery are in good contact with the appropriate surfaces. I have used a tiny piece of aluminum foil at times to increase pressure on the watch battery so that it makes better contact.
4. Your watch movement has dirt in it that is jamming the gears. Modern quartz watches are amazing devices--a tiny amount of force from the pulse motor operates an intricate gear system that moves all the watch hands and day/date wheels. Even a tiny speck of dust in the wrong place on a gear can gum up the works and cause a watch to start and stop. Usually this will happen at set time intervals or at the same time every day, because that's when a particular gear tooth comes into play.
Closely related to this is an actual bent or broken gear tooth. Same symptoms.
A watchmaker can test the gear train by placing your watch in a special testing machine that spins the gears much faster than usual. If the watch hangs up from time to time, it's suggestive of problems in the gear train. Sadly, fixing the problem by cleaning the watch may cost more than replacing the entire watch.
These are the most common causes for this behavior. Hands that rub up against one another, or a defective quartz crystal are two other potential causes, but this should serve as a fairly good checklist for obvious problems.
Good luck!

Mar 09, 2012 | Watches

1 Answer

I haven't worn my fossil watch (FS 4337 model) for some time & decide to wear it & shook it, adjust it, & it dosn't work. Usually when I don't wear it for about 2 weeks, I shake it...


If you have a Fossil FS4337 Chronograph, shaking the watch shouldn't be doing anything other than exercising your muscles; the movement is a battery-driven quartz movement whose movement is controlled only by whether the stem has been pulled out (stopping the movement and saving power) or whether the battery still has enough power to activate the stepping motors that move the watch hands. Based on the symptoms that you've described, I would suggest that it's probably time to change your watch battery.

Often, when a watch battery is running low but isn't completely dead, pulling the stem into time-setting mode will stop the movement and permit the battery to "rest," giving it (briefly) a bit more reserve amperage to put out when you push the stem back in. That's how you can sometimes get a quartz watch to run for a few minutes after the battery appears to be dead. That may also be why your watch has started running again after you've set the time and date.

Fossil analog quartz watches tend to use silver oxide (usually #377 or #379) batteries instead of longer-lasting lithium batteries. In ordinary use, I would expect a silver oxide battery to provide between 1 and 2 years of service before it needs to be replaced. I can't remember if Fossil chronographs (which also use quartz movements) use a silver oxide or lithium battery. Lithium batteries often provide an additional year or two of service in analog watches, compared to silver oxide cells; digital watches using them supposedly may last as long as 10 years with a lithium battery, assuming you don't use the backlight or audible alarm functions. Note, however, that these batteries are different sizes and different voltages, so you can't substitute one for the other.

Finally, none of this advice applies if you have a Fossil watch with a true mechanical movement in it. In that case, gently shaking the watch may spin the winding rotor enough to start the watch back up again. However, an even faster way of winding those watches is to use the winding / time set crown to wind the mainspring directly instead of relying on the geared-down action of the winding rotor. Automatic watches can bind up if they are not used for a period of time; the lubricating oil used in some of the pivots can harden--or at least provide enough resistance that the movement may require more initial force to start running than to continue running. That behavior usually indicates that it's time to have the mechanical movement cleaned and re-lubricated.

May 31, 2011 | Fossil Brushed Brown Dial Chronograph...

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Should i pull the crown to save battery if i store my quartz watch for a few months


I don't think storing a watch with the crown out accomplishes much. That I am aware of, pulling the crown out does not break the electrical connection between the battery and the watch. At least in looking at quartz movements, I don't see any electrical apparatus that insulates the crown in any way so that it could act as a switch. I think that in quartz watches that hack, pulling the crown out mechanically disengages or interferes with the drive train, but it doesn't stop the oscillator or stepper motor from running.
With quartz movements, at least those I have seen the internals of, (most ETA and ISA designs, some Rondas, a few Seikos), pulling the crown to the setting position does one of two things:
1) On better, jeweled movements - it breaks contact between the coil and battery, thus stopping the motor. The oscilator continues to be powered, but most of the current consumption is from the motor. These pulling the crown out does save battery life. Or,

2) On cheaper non-jeweled movements - it blocks the rotation of the second hand gear, and stalls the motor. These are observable by a "twitchy" second hand when the stem is out. This method actually kills the battery faster, as a stalled electric motor draws more current.

May 08, 2011 | Watches

1 Answer

Watch does not work after changing the battery


mcdevito75 here, You can try, double check the battery instalation in the watch, If all is good, try to pull out the stem and move the hands as if setting the time, then push stem back in. It"s also possible you have a weak or even dead battery, even though it was bought new.

Jul 02, 2010 | Jules Jurgensen 7793IF ( ) : Swiss Quartz...

2 Answers

Removing the crown/stem of CASIO EF-321


Other case for a simple Casio quartz watch :

ef77e0e.jpg

Jan 15, 2009 | Casio Edifice EF106D2AV Wrist Watch

1 Answer

New watch..Jules Jurgenson day-date..the stem cap is loose.


remove the cap and put a tiny drop of locktite glue on it. spill some glue onto a piece of glass or an old plate and use a sewing needle to put a tiny drop of glue in the hole then screw it back on and wait till the remaing glue on the glass is gone hard before pushing the stem back in .. this last bit is important so as not to glue the stem to the watch. if this helps please rate me joe

Nov 12, 2008 | Jules Jurgensen 5004PB ( ) : Swiss Quartz...

1 Answer

Removing the watch stem


Hi, it depends on the watch . Look carefully ,if there is a release button , somethin you can press on or lift up. Sometimes a needle is enough to do the job. On some quartz movements (the cheap ones) you just can't remove the stem ...
hope this will be helpfull!
K.

Apr 09, 2008 | Watches

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