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Get blade off from wind machine - Lasko 3300 Wind Machine Fan

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I have a TS300 table saw and the blade does turn immediately when power upped, the blade speed seem low, and the blade easily stall when cutting - even 1/4" ply.


There are two windings in the motor, a starting winding and a running winding. There's also a centrifugal starting switch in the motor that switches from the starting winding to the running winding once the motor gets up to speed. Sometimes the switch can get stuck and you almost have to give the blade a spin with your hand to get it moving-- and then it moves slowly till it picks up speed.
A rating on that saw complains it doesn't have a whole lot of power, but yours doesn't sound like its under-designed -- it sounds like there's something wrong. Does it smell hot when running? Does the arbor turn freely? Are you using a long extension cord? (dont!)
I hope you don't need a new motor ($255)
If you do, I'd sell the thing for parts on CraigsList and look for another saw in the same place. I bought one table saw on craigslist for $60 and another for $45. (You might have to watch the listings every day for a year or so to get those kind of prices.) Both of the ones I bought are belt-drive contractor's saws with a 1.5 hp motor outside the box on the back side of the saw.

Oct 17, 2014 | Saws

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Laser Lidar Guidance Adds Power to Wind Turbines The wind industry may soon be...


Laser Lidar Guidance Adds Power to Wind Turbines

The wind industry may soon be dependent on a different kind of environmental awareness that has more to do with lasers than ecology.
A new laser pointer 100mw system that can be mounted on wind turbines allows them to prepare for the wind rushing toward their blades.

The lasers act like sonar for the wind, bouncing off microscopically small particulates and back to a fiber optic detector. That data is fed to an on-board processor that generates a three-dimensional view of the wind speed and direction. Subtle adjustments in the turbine blade's angle to the window allows it to capture more energy and protect itself in case of strong gusts.
The startup company that developed the Vindicator system, Catch the Wind, recently deployed a wind unit on a Nebraska Public Power District turbine. It increased the production of the unit (.pdf) by more than 10 percent, according to the company's white paper. If those numbers held across the nations' 35 gigawatts of installed wind capacity, the laser lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) sensors could add more than 3.5 gigawatts of wind capacity without adding a single additional turbine.
"This is what they call disruptive technology," said William Fetzer, vice president of business development for Catch the Wind. "There are roughly 80,000 to 90,000 wind turbines out in the world, and they don't have this technology."
Wind farms are only as good as their data. There have been revolutions in assessing wind resources over long time-scales, but the short-term gustiness of the wind has remained a problem.
Current wind turbines rely on wind-measuring instruments known as anemometers that are mounted to the back of the turbine's gear-housing unit, called a nacelle. The data from the wind is fed to a computer that optimizes the blades' configuration to capture the most energy from the wind.

In many cases, cup anemometers, which took their current form in the 1930s, are still used. They work well enough, but have to be positioned behind the blades, which subjects them to turbulence. And, importantly, they can only tell you how fast the wind was blowing after it passed. That doesn't help you with a freak gust of wind or any of the odd behavior that renewable energy developers have caught the wind exhibiting.
Fort Felker, director of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center, said he saw great potential in laser pointer 200mw lidar and similar sound-wave-based systems generally.
"Once you have a detailed knowledge of the coming wind, there are a lot of opportunities," said Felker told Wired.com.
While he estimates the amount of energy that could be captured is below Catch the Wind's 10 percent, he said the systems could really help reduce the wear-and-tear on machines caused by strong winds hitting improperly positioned blades.
"Researchers have already demonstrated that substantial reduction of loads is certainly possible," Felker said.
laser lidar, despite first being demonstrated for wind measurement in the 1970s, has been slow to catch on. The systems have been too expensive.
"Widespread deployment of the technique has so far been hampered by the expense and complexity of laser lidar systems," a 2005 NREL research report found. "However, the recent development of laser lidar systems based on optical fiber and components from the telecommunications industry promises large improvements in cost, compactness, and reliability so that it becomes viable to consider the deployment of such systems on large wind turbines."
Now, even the most venerable R&D testing group in the world, the Danish National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy's Ris?e wind outfit, is working on a turbine-mounted laser lidar system, though they only claim a 5 percent increase in electricity production.

Catch the Wind grew out of a small-business grant that the company's predecessor, Optical Air Data Systems, received from the U.S. military. They developed a laser lidar system for helicopters working in the dusty Iraq and Afghanistan terrain. The company developed their rugged and relatively lightweight laser lidar systems by marrying aerospace knowledge with emerging telecommunications tech like better fiber optic cables and laser pointer 300mw diodes.
Still, Catch the Wind may have a tough road ahead. The energy industry is notoriously risk averse. Besides, wind electricity in many places is already cheaper than wholesale electricity prices.
Erin Edholm, a representative for National Wind, a wind-farm developer that's put in more than 4,000 megawatts of turbines, said that the company's wind resource assessment team "has not used [laser lidar] or considered using it to date."
But that doesn't dim the hopes of Catch the Wind's Fetzer for the company's ultimate success.
"When you do disruptive technologies, it takes time," Fetzer said. "People don't believe that things are as bad as they are until they can see what we can do."
It helps that they don't need the wind turbine manufacturers to incorporate their technology to jump start their business. They've got what's known as a "bolt-on" solution, meaning it can be attached to existing turbines. They don't need manufacturers to incorporate their product to sell it to wind farms.
Still, some wind farmers may worry that the warranties they have on their turbines would be voided by adding a laser lidar system. Fetzer said Catch the Wind is working out the warranty issues.
General Electric, which is the largest wind turbine manufacturer in the United States, is not using or developing laser lidar specifically, either. Catch the Wind did recently sell one of their machines to a large, unnamed turbine manufacturer.
Though Catch the Wind is not discussing pricing for their products, Fetzer maintains that their customers will make their money back in the three-to-five year range that he says wind developers are looking for. The 2005 NREL report calculated a preliminary cost for a generic laser lidar system of less than $95,000, once production was up and running.
The development of controls for capturing the most energy from the wind has been a constant theme in wind energy research. But it's not always the company that develops the technology that reaps the rewards from its commercialization. Wind turbines in the 1980s struggled mightily to convert the wind's gusty capriciousness into steady rotary power.
At the time, the turbine's rotor had to turn at a constant rate. Researchers realized that their machines could operate over a larger range of speeds if the rotor could speed up or slow down in response to the wind, but they would need power electronics to translate the power into electricity suitable for the grid.

A multimillion dollar R&D program launched by laser pointer U.S. Windpower and the Electric Power Research Institute to commercialize a variable-speed rotor resulted in a mostly defective turbine design that helped push U.S. Windpower out of business. The variable-speed rotor went on to become a standard part of wind turbine designs.
Catch the Wind obviously is hoping not to suffer the same fate. They are exploring a variety of business models including sharing the revenue from the extra power they say their systems can generate. If they don't generate any more electricity, the wind turbine owner doesn't pay anything. If they do, Catch the Wind gets half the take.

on May 19, 2016 | Infiniter 2000 Green 532nm Laser Pointer

1 Answer

How does a wind turbine work?


A Wind turbine operates on a simple principle .The energy in the wind turns 2 or 3 propellor like blades around a rotor .The rotor is connected to the main shaft which spins a generator to create electricity. Wind turbines are mounted on a tower to capture the most wind energy.

Aug 31, 2014 | Vacuums

1 Answer

Why won't my ride on mower start makes winding noise ?


Check the blade on the mower. Make sure it is tight and that the shear pin has not been broken. There is a shear pin on the crankshaft that keeps the blade from turning along with the nut that holds the blade on. designed to break off if you hit something with the blade. That is so it doesn't bend the crankshaft. Also make sure that the starter works and that the gear that turns the flywheel has not broken off a tooth.

Aug 08, 2014 | Briggs & Stratton Garden

1 Answer

How is the fan blade separated from the motor


Should be 2 screws attaching it to motor . 2 screws per blade. They may be above lite kit to where you can't easily see them and the screws are same color as blade arms .

Jan 24, 2012 | Lasko 3300 Wind Machine Fan

1 Answer

Is there a means for a technically competent handyman to lubricate the bearings of the lasko wind machine 3300?


The fan and motor are both easily disassembled with a Phillips screwdriver and some gentle force to remove the blades. Try to use even pressure when removing both the blades and opening the motor housing. The only questions are whether to flush the existing lubricant out of the bearings and what to replace it with. If you know what to use it shouldn't be a problem. If anyone could suggest an oil or grease, please do.

Apr 03, 2011 | Lasko 3300 Wind Machine¿ Floor / Box...

2 Answers

Fan rattles when running. It appears that the fan blade hits the inner plastic piece behind the fan blade.


Open it up by removing screws and plastic backing. See this black round rubber fixture? Apply some WD-40 inside it and you'll be back to quiet fan operation.
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Jan 15, 2011 | Lasko 3300 Wind Machine Fan

2 Answers

How do you take off the spinning part off of a lasko fan?


Just hold the blade and use a sharp knife and cut the string. It's really not that hard!

Jul 28, 2009 | Lasko 3300 Wind Machine¿ Floor / Box...

1 Answer

Lasko electric fan purchased from Walgreen's; called "wind machine"; turned on fan yesterday and blades barely move.


is the motor getting hot? try lubricating the main bearings.sounds like dry bearings .farr64

Apr 29, 2009 | Dryers

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