Question about Health & Beauty

1 Answer

What is the cause of low sodium in your blood?

Low blood pressure,blood tests showed low sodium,feel tired no energy.

Posted by Anonymous on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Master:

    An expert who has achieved Level 3.

  • Master
  • 570 Answers

Probably caused by a low sodium diet, or being in a hot climate when not used to it.

Posted on Oct 28, 2015

3 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 34124 Answers

SOURCE: Does high blood pressures med.cause you to have memory problems? And is there a way to get back off high blood pressure meds.?

You mom should refer this to her doctor.

Posted on Jan 06, 2014

ladywritr2
  • 948 Answers

SOURCE: Does high blood pressures med.cause you to have memory problems? And is there a way to get back off high blood pressure meds.?

As you know from watching television, all medications have many potential side effects. However, having said that, as a working RN for 25 years, I have never heard of blood pressure meds causing memory problems. If anything, it is the other way around: high blood pressure may cause decreased circulation to the brain and therefore possibly cause some memory loss. The thing about blood pressure meds is this: they are very very important! If you allow high blood pressure to go untreated, you can damage your eyes and your kidneys, both which have tons of small blood vessels. You can also wind up having a stroke. Generally, it is unsafe to get off blood pressure medications on your own.

Posted on May 10, 2015

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

When I take my blood pressure, the lower reading is regularly in the 50's. If it was higher would I have more energy?


Possibly. Low blood pressure is good in that you will live longer, but can make you a bit fatigued. The ideal is 140/80

Ideally, you should have a blood test to check your levels of iron, and a general check up. I am only an amateur doctor :>)

Symptoms By Mayo Clinic Staff For some people, low blood pressure can signal an underlying problem, especially when it drops suddenly or is accompanied by signs and symptoms such as:
  • Dizziness or lightheadedness
  • Fainting (syncope)
  • Lack of concentration
  • Blurred vision
  • Nausea
  • Cold, clammy, pale skin
  • Rapid, shallow breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Depression
  • Thirst

When to see a doctor

In many instances, low blood pressure isn't serious. If you have consistently low readings but feel fine, your doctor is likely to monitor you during routine exams.
Even occasional dizziness or lightheadedness may be a relatively minor problem - the result of mild dehydration from too much time in the sun or a hot tub, for example. In these situations, it's not a matter so much of how far, but of how quickly, your blood pressure drops.
Still, it's important to see your doctor if you experience any signs or symptoms of hypotension because they sometimes can point to more-serious problems. It can be helpful to keep a record of your symptoms, when they occur and what you were doing at the time.
low blood pressure Google Search

Jan 25, 2017 | The Health & Beauty

1 Answer

I am 79 years old and have a iron blood level at 11. Am told the norm is 400. Im trying to understand. This being investigated.


Your iron level in blood is what carries the oxygen to your brain, if the blood level is low 10 is low you may have lack of energy and feel tired.
it depends what your normal level has been all along, everyone has a different level that's how they get the averages. If yours is dropped radically then that's why they're doing the investigation.
You can add iron to your diet by eating leafy green vegetables as well as possibly trying a multivitamin that has an iron component to it or there are iron tablets that you can take over the counter but you have to be very careful because they cause severe constipation. And usually with the constipation the cure is worse than the disease.
When you don't understand what the doctor tells you it's important for you to tell him that so that he can put it in language that you do understand.
Good luck stay well

Nov 28, 2016 | Health & Beauty

1 Answer

I just took my blood pressure it was 111/70 I am 78 yrs. old Is this good or low?


Sounds just about right how do you feel.
Blood pressure is just one indicator of your health I find the more I check the sicker I feel.
If you have a good energy level are eating a good diet don't get dizzy when you stand up or faint or feel like you're heads busting open when you do stand up or move quickly then your blood pressure is probably just fine.
Listen to the signs are body is giving you.
Good luck and stay active.

Nov 22, 2016 | Health & Beauty

1 Answer

What is pearinda plus tablets to treat


PEARINDA belongs to a class of medicines called ACE inhibitors. ACE stands for angiotensin converting enzyme. It works by blocking ACE, an enzyme involved in narrowing blood vessels and causing sodium and fluid retention by the kidneys. This causes blood vessels to relax, allowing blood to flow more freely and at a lower pressure, and increasing the heart's ability to pump blood in some types of heart failure.
source
PEARINDA

Oct 20, 2016 | Tablets & eReaders

3 Answers

What causes low blood pressure?


Conditions that can cause low blood pressure:


low_blood_pressure_s1_what_is_blood_pressure-4xwaymabyncayl4wodcgvxkn-4-0.jpg
1. Dehydration. When your body loses more water than it takes in, it can cause weakness, dizziness and fatigue.
2. Endocrine problems. Thyroid conditions such as parathyroid disease, adrenal insufficiency (Addison's disease), low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and, in some cases, diabetes can trigger low blood pressure.3. Lack of nutrients in your diet. A lack of the vitamins B-12 and folate can keep your body from producing enough red blood cells (anemia), causing low blood pressure.4. Heart problems. Some heart conditions that can lead to low blood pressure include extremely low heart rate (bradycardia), heart valve problems, heart attack and heart failure.
5.
Pregnancy. Because the circulatory system expands rapidly during pregnancy, blood pressure is likely to drop.

Oct 19, 2016 | Health & Beauty

1 Answer

How to control blood pressure?


If you've been diagnosed with high blood pressure, you might be worried about taking medication to bring your numbers down.
Lifestyle plays an important role in treating your high blood pressure. If you successfully control your blood pressure with a healthy lifestyle, you might avoid, delay or reduce the need for medication.
Here are 10 lifestyle changes you can make to lower your blood pressure and keep it down.
1. Lose extra pounds and watch your waistlineBlood pressure often increases as weight increases. Being overweight also can cause disrupted breathing while you sleep (sleep apnea), which further raises your blood pressure.
Weight loss is one of the most effective lifestyle changes for controlling blood pressure. Losing just 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) can help reduce your blood pressure.
Besides shedding pounds, you generally should also keep an eye on your waistline. Carrying too much weight around your waist can put you at greater risk of high blood pressure.
In general:
Men are at risk if their waist measurement is greater than 40 inches (102 centimeters).Women are at risk if their waist measurement is greater than 35 inches (89 centimeters).These numbers vary among ethnic groups. Ask your doctor about a healthy waist measurement for you.
2. Exercise regularlyRegular physical activity - at least 30 minutes most days of the week - can lower your blood pressure by 4 to 9 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg). It's important to be consistent because if you stop exercising, your blood pressure can rise again.
If you have slightly high blood pressure (prehypertension), exercise can help you avoid developing full-blown hypertension. If you already have hypertension, regular physical activity can bring your blood pressure down to safer levels.
The best types of exercise for lowering blood pressure include walking, jogging, cycling, swimming or dancing. Strength training also can help reduce blood pressure. Talk to your doctor about developing an exercise program.
3. Eat a healthy dietEating a diet that is rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products and skimps on saturated fat and cholesterol can lower your blood pressure by up to 14 mm Hg. This eating plan is known as the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet.
It isn't easy to change your eating habits, but with these tips, you can adopt a healthy diet:
Keep a food diary. Writing down what you eat, even for just a week, can shed surprising light on your true eating habits. Monitor what you eat, how much, when and why.Consider boosting potassium. Potassium can lessen the effects of sodium on blood pressure. The best source of potassium is food, such as fruits and vegetables, rather than supplements. Talk to your doctor about the potassium level that's best for you.Be a smart shopper. Read food labels when you shop and stick to your healthy-eating plan when you're dining out, too.4. Reduce sodium in your dietEven a small reduction in the sodium in your diet can reduce blood pressure by 2 to 8 mm Hg.
The effect of sodium intake on blood pressure varies among groups of people. In general, limit sodium to less than 2,300 milligrams (mg) a day or less. However, a lower sodium intake - 1,500 mg a day or less - is appropriate for people with greater salt sensitivity, including:
African-AmericansAnyone age 51 or olderAnyone diagnosed with high blood pressure, diabetes or chronic kidney diseaseTo decrease sodium in your diet, consider these tips:
Read food labels. If possible, choose low-sodium alternatives of the foods and beverages you normally buy.Eat fewer processed foods. Only a small amount of sodium occurs naturally in foods. Most sodium is added during processing.Don't add salt. Just 1 level teaspoon of salt has 2,300 mg of sodium. Use herbs or spices to add flavor to your food.Ease into it. If you don't feel you can drastically reduce the sodium in your diet suddenly, cut back gradually. Your palate will adjust over time.5. Limit the amount of alcohol you drinkAlcohol can be both good and bad for your health. In small amounts, it can potentially lower your blood pressure by 2 to 4 mm Hg.
But that protective effect is lost if you drink too much alcohol - generally more than one drink a day for women and for men older than age 65, or more than two a day for men age 65 and younger. One drink equals 12 ounces of beer, five ounces of wine or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor.
Drinking more than moderate amounts of alcohol can actually raise blood pressure by several points. It can also reduce the effectiveness of blood pressure medications.
http://electronicshelponline.blogspot.com/
http://meditreatsold.blogspot.com/

Aug 22, 2016 | Health & Beauty

1 Answer

Low blood sodium symptons


Please go to this link on the Mayo clinic website. They have good advice. I hope you are feeling better soon:
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hyponatremia/basics/causes/con-20031445
Here is part of the information they have:
Sodium plays a key role in your body. It helps maintain normal blood pressure, supports the work of your nerves and muscles, and regulates your body's fluid balance.
A normal sodium level is between 135 and 145 milliequivalents per liter (mEq/L) of sodium. Hyponatremia occurs when the sodium in your blood falls below 135 mEq/L.
Many possible conditions and lifestyle factors can lead to hyponatremia, including:
  • Certain medications. Some medications, such as some water pills (diuretics), antidepressants and pain medications, can cause you to go to the bathroom and empty your bladder or perspire more than normal.
  • Heart, kidney and liver problems. Congestive heart failure and certain diseases affecting the kidneys or liver can cause fluids to accumulate in your body, which dilutes the sodium in your body, lowering the overall level.
  • Syndrome of inappropriate anti-diuretic hormone (SIADH).In this condition, high levels of the anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) are produced, causing your body to retain water instead of excreting it normally.
  • Chronic, severe vomiting or diarrhea. This causes your body to lose fluids and electrolytes, such as sodium.
  • Drinking too much water. Because you lose sodium through sweat, drinking too much water during endurance activities, such as marathons and triathlons, can dilute the sodium content of your blood. Drinking too much water at other times can also cause low sodium.
  • Dehydration. Taking in too little fluid can also be a problem. If you get dehydrated, your body loses fluids and electrolytes.
  • Hormonal changes. Adrenal gland insufficiency (Addison's disease) affects your adrenal glands' ability to produce hormones that help maintain your body's balance of sodium, potassium and water. Low levels of thyroid hormone also can cause a low blood-sodium level.
  • The recreational **** *******. This amphetamine increases the risk of severe and even fatal cases of hyponatremia.

Apr 28, 2016 | The Health & Beauty

1 Answer

Low blood sodium levels symptoms


sodium is a necessary electrolyte, electrolyte imbalance will cause many uncomfortable symptoms... Pounding heart, fatigue, confusion, and a craving for salty foods (if you didn't have that already.)

Apr 28, 2016 | Health-O-Meter Health & Beauty

1 Answer

Blood test abbreviations list


Common Blood Test Abbreviations
  • ALT - Alanine Transaminase (part of liver function test)
  • ANA - Antinuclear Antibody (part of liver function test)
  • AST - Alanine Aminotransferase (part of liver function test)
  • BAC - Blood Alcohol Concentration
  • BMP - Basic Metabolic Panel (a group of tests)
  • BNP - Beta Natriuretic Peptide (testing for congestive heart failure)
  • BUN - Blood Urea Nitrogen (part of kidney function test)
  • CA - Calcium (test blood calcium levels)
  • CBC - Complete Blood Count (test red and white blood cells)
  • CK - Creatine Phosphokinase (test for muscle damage)
  • CR - Creatinine (part of kidney function test)
  • ESR - Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (tests for inflammation)
  • HCT - Hematocrit (part of the CBC test)
  • HDL/LDL - High Density Lipoproteins/High Density Lipoproteins (testing for good and bad cholesterol)
  • INR - International Normalized Ratio (blood clotting test)
  • K - Potassium (test for potassium levels)
  • Mg - Magnesium (test for magnesium levels)
  • Na - Sodium (test for sodium levels)
  • PSA - Prostate Specific Antigen (prostate cancer test)
  • PT - Prothrombin Time (test blood clotting)
  • RBC - Red Blood Cell Count (part of the CBC test)
  • TPO - Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies (test for antibodies to thyroid)
  • Trig - Triglygerides (part of cholesterol test)
  • TSH - Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (one of the main tests of a thyroid test)
  • WBC - White Blood Cell Count (part of the CBC test)

Jan 29, 2014 | Health & Beauty

Not finding what you are looking for?
Health & Beauty Logo

Related Topics:

882 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Health & Beauty Experts

Robin Hill
Robin Hill

Level 3 Expert

1263 Answers

wcdoc1953
wcdoc1953

Level 2 Expert

278 Answers

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

75797 Answers

Are you a Health and Beauty Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...