Question about Televison & Video

1 Answer

Even with addition of an amplified antennae I get no satisfacton. Unable to set-up this brand new TV I received yesterday, June 19, 2009.

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Genius:

    An expert who has answered 1,000 questions.

  • Master
  • 1,689 Answers

Hi dhenrie,

what is the brand and model of your TV?

Posted on Jun 20, 2009

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of.(from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones)
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

FM antenna for Sony DE545 with coaxiial connection to the receiver/amplifier


The coax connector is an F-type (just like the one on a TV set). Just about any aftermarket "rabbit ears" antenna will do.

Sep 06, 2015 | Sony Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

What antenna works on Toshiba 20VL43U? I purchased Mediasonic Homeworx HW110AN Super Thin Indoor HDTV Antenna - 25 Miles Range.


I recently went through a whole song & dance about HDTV antennas for my RV. I bought two different directional high-gain antennas, only to find that they wouldn't even receive signals at my home! When I'd reorient the antenna and initiate another channel search, I would sometimes get ONE or TWO channels... then I'd lose them when I'd try to reorient the antenna.
What I figured out is that DIRECTIONAL HDTV ANTENNAS ARE, ESSENTIALLY, WORTHLESS. There is really no way of knowing precisely which direction the broadcast towers are and, even if you knew, they will not all usually be clustered in one small area... they may be scattered here & there around your area.
What I eventually did is bought an OMNIDIRECTIONAL HIGH GAIN ANTENNA, which was no more expensive than the DIRECTIONAL antennas I tried. Did a channel search, and got almost all of the channels in my area!
Any omnidirectional HDTV antenna will work with your television, but I'd recommend buying the one with the highest GAIN (expressed in "dB" or "dBi" with the highest number being best). Try to find a POWERED antenna with an internal SIGNAL AMPLIFIER.
Also, if you live far away from broadcast towers as I do, you may wish to consider adding an additional SIGNAL AMPLIFIER as well.

May 21, 2015 | Toshiba Televison & Video

1 Answer

TV reception breaking up pretty bad because of rainy weather here in Brooklyn New York I live in an apartment and I'm using a Winegard amplified antenna does anyone have any suggestions what improving...


Television signals are at such high frequencoies they will be reflected form buildings and other objects, and attentuated by moisture in the air and through the leqaves of trees, etc. In large cities yourt TV singals can arrive from different paths Digital TV signals bounce as di the old "analog TV" signals but the technology allows the receiver to ignor singals that are out of phase so the picture is "clean" despite multipleversions of the signal arriving at the antenna at slightly different times. That said, if the signal is weak, there is little you can do other than experimanet with positioning the receivng antenna. Typically, building walls attentuate televisoin signals so locating the receving antenna close to a window often provides for stronger signal reception.

Amplified antennas cannot amplify what is not there. Moisture in the form of fog, rain and snow will attenuate television signals and if thre signals are marginal in good weather, they may be virtually not-existent in wet weather. Digital TV signals are threshold dependent. When they are toow eak, you won't see anything. Back in the old analog TV days, you could see a "snowy picture" but digital TV doesn't allow for that. The signal is either strong enough to be viewed or it is not.

You have few real options if you do not subscribe to cable or a satellite tv provider. Amplified antennas can help but if you need them you live in a marginal TV reception area to begin with and more prone to the vagaries of weather and the seasons.

Jan 18, 2015 | Winegard FL5500A FlatWave Amped Indoor...

1 Answer

Unable to pickup digital tv signals even with amplified digital aerial


You may not have a digital tuner in the tv / vcr. There are digital tuners available that solve the problem. They connect to the digital antenna and then to the tv through A/V cables or thru a coax antenna input to the tv.

Jan 05, 2014 | Alba Televison & Video

1 Answer

JVC HD-56G886 tuner stopped working


My (unfortunate) guess would be the Tuner received a static discharge when you were changing the antennas... this time of the year is bad for static - if you're in a "Winter" climate.

Receivers have a very sensitive FET or MMIC amplifier right inside from the antenna connection to make it better for picking up distant stations.

However, this same "sensitive" amplifier is also prone to being destroyed by even a small static discharge... especially if the tuner had its power turned ON.

Sad to say, it's likely toasted... :-(
(I hope I'm wrong... but you have already tried all other possible solutions)

Jan 12, 2013 | JVC HD-56G886 56" Rear Projection HDTV

2 Answers

Tried to hook up a HD antenna but it won't work


HD is pretty critical and if a indoor antenna do not expect much or anything for that matter.

Jun 17, 2012 | Televison & Video

1 Answer

FM antenna is not providing reception, despite cable connected to powered antenna amplifier. TV also connected to powered antenna amplifier (splitter) works fine. FM mode produces only static. I purchased...


If I understand your setup, you've connected the receiver antenna terminal to the output of the antenna amplifier. If this is true, I'd suggest trying the receiver using a plain old FM dipole antenna (available at Radio Shack and other stores) or even just a piece of wire hooked to the antenna terminal. You should be able to pick up some local FM stations then.

What might be happening is that the FM is being filtered out by the amplifier. Some amps made mainly as a TV signal booster have an FM trap designed to block the FM broadcast band. In the analog broadcast days, the FM band was right near the sound part of a TV signal, and the trap was there to prevent interference. It may be filtering out your FM band.It may also be possible that you're just overloading the FM antenna input with the amplified signal. Sometimes a signal can be too strong. Using a simple wire antenna will let you test the receiver by itself.

Other than connecting an antenna you shouldn't have to do any setup for FM reception. If you still get no stations at all when using a simple antenna, then the receiver may need service. But I doubt Circuit City would have sold a floor model that was defective, even at the very end, unless it was clearly marked as such and sold "as-is". I'm pretty sure you'll find that the receiver works with an antenna made for FM.

Sep 14, 2011 | Denon DRA-37

1 Answer

We want to hook our small Magnavox tv to a rabbit ear antennae to get only local stations. How to do this?


Unless this a new TV with ATSC (digital) tuning built in, you will need a digital adapter for off-the-air reception. Older TV sets have analog tuners, and analog broadcasting ended in June 2009. Wal-Mart and Radio Shack carry the adapters, as do other retailers. Your antenna connects to the adapter, and the adapter sends the converted signal to the TV on channel 3 or 4.

With digital broadcasting, a strong signal is necessary. Unlike the analog days, when a weak signal just meant a fuzzy picture, a weak digital signal will cause pixellation (blockiness) or freezing of the picture, or may not even be detected by the tuner. Depending on how far you are from the station's transmitter, you may find that rabbit-ears may not work too well. You may need an amplified antenna or even one outside to get best performance.

Aug 07, 2011 | Televison & Video

2 Answers

Why won't my new Vizio DTV work on an antenna without the digital box?


Do you have the antenna aimed correctly and the correct antenna for the distance between your location and the stations? Check antennaweb.org and tvfool.com for the directions to the stations you should be able to receive. Antennaweb assumes an external antenna and is very conservative in the station list. TVfool gives the stations you should get with various different types of antennas. Tall trees and buildings will block signal strength so consider the environment around you.

With digital signals, if you do not have enough signal strength for a given tuner, the channel will not come in. An amplifier may help you get the signal, particularly if the signal is shared to several devices. Failure of an amplifier or lightning surge protection can stop the signal from reaching the TV. A surge through the antenna can damage the tuner.

A damaged cable can also be a source of a problem. Check the outside portion of the wire as well as the interior wires. Replace any that have damaged insulation or ends.

For this TV, if you have done a channel scan with the TV set to the Input TV/DTV, and the Signal Source set to Antenna. Turn the antenna and then set the Additional Scan to On. (Menu > TV > Channels > Additional Scan.) Then do another channel scan.

If you need a copy of the manual, see: http://www.vizio.com/m220va.html#support .

Jan 22, 2011 | Vizio M220VA 22 in. LCD HDTV

1 Answer

I get no stations on my tv


Use an Antenna that Provides Good Reception of All Channels
  • Most existing antennas used by consumers will provide good reception of DTV signals. (Before making any changes, try your existing antenna first to see of it allows you to receive all the stations you normally watch.)
  • For watching DTV signals, you will need an antenna that provides good reception of both VHF signals (channels 2-13) and UHF signals (channels 14-51) to reliably receive all of the digital signals broadcast in your area.
  • Many antennas are designed only for reception of either VHF or UHF signals (but not both). For example, the commonly used “rabbit ears” indoor antenna is only suitable for receiving VHF signals. To receive UHF signals, an indoor antenna should also include a wire loop or other feature for reception in that band.
  • The reception capabilities of TV antennas also vary considerably, so be sure to talk to retail consultants and look at information on the packaging and/or the Internet to make sure that any new antenna you may choose provides good reception of both VHF and UHF channels. In addition, if you use an indoor antenna and receive signals on VHF channels, you may need to use an antenna with amplification.
  • Many antennas currently being sold as “HDTV Antennas,” perform best at receiving UHF signals; some of these models state that they provide reception of signals on channels 7-13 but actually perform less well receiving those channels. If you obtain one of these antennas, be sure it provides good reception of all the VHF channels as well as the UHF channels.
  • To check for the DTV signals that are available at your location, use the DTV Reception Maps available at www.fcc.gov/mb/engineering/maps.
Check Your Connections
  • Check that your digital-to-analog converter box or digital television is connected properly. Make sure your antenna is connected to the antenna input of your digital-to-analog converter box or digital television. If using a digital-to-analog converter box, also ensure that the antenna output of your converter box is connected to the antenna input of your analog TV. Refer to the owner’s manuals of your components if you are unsure of the proper connections.
  • Ensure that your components are plugged in and have their power turned on.
  • If you have a digital-to-analog converter box, tune your analog TV to channel 3. You should see a set-up menu or picture displayed on your TV screen. If you do not see a set-up menu or picture, tune your TV to channel 4. If you still do not see a set-up menu or picture, recheck your connections.
Perform a Channel Scan
  • Digital-to-analog converter boxes and digital televisions have a button, usually on the remote control, that is labeled “set-up” or “menu” or some similar term. Press that button to access the set-up menu. Using the directional arrow buttons on your remote, scroll to the option that allows you to perform a “channel scan.” The channel scan will automatically search for digital broadcast channels that are available in your area. Consult the owner’s manual of your digital-to-analog converter box or digital television for detailed instructions on how to perform a channel scan for your device.
  • Once the channel scan is complete, you will be able to tune to the digital channels received by your antenna. You should perform a channel scan periodically to check whether additional digital channels have become available.
Adjust Your Antenna
  • Small adjustments to your antenna can make a big difference in the number of digital channels you can receive. If you have an indoor antenna, try elevating it and moving it closer to an exterior wall of your home. After adjusting your antenna, perform another channel scan to see if your reception is improved.
  • While adjusting your antenna, it may be helpful to access the “signal strength meter” on your digital-to-analog converter box or digital television to determine whether your adjustments are improving the signals’ strength. The signal strength meter is usually accessed through the menu feature on your remote control. Refer to the owner’s manual of your device for detailed instructions on how to access its signal strength meter. Remember to do another channel scan after you have adjusted your antenna.
  • Television stations broadcasting in digital use both the VHF band (channels 2-13) and UHF band (channels 14-51). Many indoor antennas use “rabbit ears” for the VHF band and a “loop” or “bow-tie” antenna for the UHF band. Make sure you are using an antenna that covers both the VHF and UHF bands and have connected it properly.
If You are Still Having Difficulty:
  • Until June 12, 2009, some stations will be operating at reduced power levels. If you are not receiving certain digital TV stations, this does not necessarily mean there is a problem with your antenna or digital-to-analog converter box or digital television. Check with the TV station to find out whether they are planning changes that will improve reception.
  • When an analog TV signal is weak or receives interference, static, snow, and distortion will often appear on the screen. Digital broadcasting will provide a clear picture; however, if the signal falls below a certain minimum strength, the picture can disappear. This “cliff effect” means that if you watch analog TV stations that have static and distortion, you may have to adjust or upgrade your antenna system.
  • Simple indoor antennas provide minimal performance that may not be suitable for your location. If you are unable to obtain satisfactory DTV reception with your current indoor antenna, you may wish to obtain an indoor antenna that includes features for better reception of UHF signals, as well as VHF, and/or an amplifier to boost the received signal (often referred to as an active indoor antenna).
  • Generally, an outdoor antenna will get better reception than an indoor antenna. However, the performance of outdoor antennas can degrade over time due to exposure to the weather. If you are having problems, check for loose or corroded wiring, broken antenna elements and that the antenna is pointed in the right direction.
  • Try to keep the length of wire between your antenna and digital-to-analog converter box or digital television as short as possible for best reception.
  • “Splitters” that are used to connect a single antenna to multiple digital-to-analog converter boxes or digital televisions reduce the amount of signal available to each device. If you are having problems, check whether reception is improved without the splitter. In some cases an “active” splitter that includes an amplifier can solve the problem.
  • If you are near a station’s broadcast tower, reception of that station, as well as other stations, can be impeded by strong signal “overload.” Consider using an “attenuator” or removing amplifiers to improve your reception.
  • If you decide to replace or upgrade your indoor or outdoor antenna, many types are available from electronics retail stores at a variety of prices. Websites such as www.antennaweb.org provide information on the locations of broadcast towers and the types of outdoor antennas appropriate for the stations you wish to receive. If you need assistance with upgrading your antenna system, check with a local antenna retailer or antenna installer.
  • To check for the DTV signals that are available at your location, use the DTV Reception Maps available at www.fcc.gov/mb/engineering/maps.
Hope it may helps:

Regards:
VOTIT

Jun 15, 2009 | Insignia Digital-to-Analog Converter for...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Televison & Video Logo

Related Topics:

28 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Televison & Video Experts

The Knight
The Knight

Level 3 Expert

74459 Answers

Donald DCruz
Donald DCruz

Level 3 Expert

17130 Answers

Electro Med Services...
Electro Med Services...

Level 3 Expert

6694 Answers

Are you a Televison and Video Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...