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A list of abbreviations

Pixels per inch

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Pixels per inch is "ppi".

Posted on Apr 22, 2014

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List of abbreviations for crochet


easiest Google ever! :>) There are images to in the main link at the bottom.

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Apr 30, 2017 | Sewing Machines

1 Answer

What's a quick way to convert pixels to inches?


pixels / DPI = inches

DPI is Dots Per Inch

Mar 13, 2017 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Why do scanned documents appear unclear in PDF format?


Perhaps you're scanning at too low resolution? If you want images to be clear at normal size, scan at 300 pixels per inch. Your scanner may be scanning at fax resolution, 100 by 200 pixels per inch.

May 15, 2015 | Office Equipment & Supplies

1 Answer

Why possible is 300 dpi printing images and text matter


What is DPI PPI and Why Do They Matter
To some extent, we're all photographers these days. With a camera on every phone and digital SLRs coming down in price, we've all got a trove of photos waiting to be shared. When it comes time to share online, print, or email our favorite images, many are unsure about how to set the image's resolution...
If you've found yourself in this spot, don't worry - dots per inch (shortened to DPI from here on out) is a concept that even confounds some professional graphic artists. Here's a primer DPI so you can stop worrying about technology and start sharing your photos.
Getting started
Digital photos are comprised of pixels, much like the individual boxes on a sheet of graph paper. DPI tells you how small those pixels will be when the image is printed. For example, "300 dots per inch" means that 300 pixels fit across each inch. If your photo is 600 pixels tall by 900 pixels wide, for example, it would come out at 2" x 3" inches if you were to print at 300 DPI. Keep in mind that most digital photos are several thousand pixels in either direction, but for the sake of simplicity, we'll use the more manageable 600 x 900 pixels.
Separating pixels from presentation
It's important to separate DPI from the raw pixel dimensions, and this is where even the pros slip up. DPI is not an indication of image quality or clarity. When you print that 600 x 900 pixel image at 300DPI, it'll likely look pretty sharp, because every inch is densely packed with pixels.
Now imagine printing that same image, with the same number of pixels, at a mere 30 DPI. As each inch would have only 30 pixels across, the density drops immensely and the image prints much larger: 20" by 30". What was once sharp now appears blurry, because each individual pixel is now ten times larger than before. By separating DPI from actual pixel count, we can understand that raising DPI doesn't magically improve a photo. DPI simply takes the same data (the original pixels) and alters how we'll view them.
Pin it It's all about context
Another factor is viewing distance. Just think of the eye chart at your doctor's office. If you're a bit nearsighted, the tiny letters at the bottom are illegible specks, while the letters at the top are easily discerned. In actuality, each tiny letter may be half an inch tall, but the distance makes them seem microscopic. Now consider our 600 by 900 pixel image. When we printed it at 30 DPI, the giant pixels made it look blurry. Were we to look at it across the doctor's office long hallway, however, it may look just as sharp as the 300 DPI print did in our hands. This illustrates how DPI is more about context than quality.

Pin it Pixels Per Inch
You'll notice I've been talking about DPI in relation to printing only. This is because while printers can produce a variety of DPI settings, a computer display's resolution is fixed - its pixel density is part of the physical hardware, and cannot be altered. When talking about displays instead of print, most use the term PPI, or "pixels per inch."
If you intend to put your 600 x 900 pixel image online, switching the resolution to 30, 300, or 3000 PPI is completely arbitrary, because the computer display can't change its density. As modern desktop displays usually have a PPI in the low 100s, the 600 x 900 pixel image will appear around 6" by 9" (mobile displays may be much higher). Of course, your web browser could display the image smaller if need be, but it will do so by averaging and eliminating pixels, not squeezing them to be physically smaller. This is why it's always important to keep your end goal in mind when working with images.
In summary:
• An image is defined by its pixel dimensions - # pixels tall by # pixels wide
• DPI/PPI determines the scale and pixel density at which image will be displayed
• What appears blurry from close up may look fine at a distance, so consider how an image will be seen
• Printers can produce a range of DPIs, while displays have fixed resolution
Whether you're a blogger dealing with an upload limit or are just trying to print a photo to hang on the wall, understanding DPI/PPI can go a long way. I hope these tips help you feel more in control of your images and how you share them with the world!


Oct 07, 2014 | Canon LASER SHOT LBP-2900 Printer

3 Answers

My writing is so small i can't read any thing on my computer because of this i can't read anthing you write back so can someone call me at 901-283-0239


You can increase the size of text by pressing control + or - buttons press control button first. Also there is zoom in the tools section and also you can increase the size of text in the control panel or the web page under tools sections of most browsers. If we new the browser or what you text is small in or even if it was small every where you can change the resolution size of your Windows. Win 7 you can incease text by going to control panel click on display once there go to where it says increase your text size. Not sure what your operating system is either. So assuming it is Win 7 I hope that this assists you. John

Jan 26, 2011 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

When scanning dots show up in a vertical pattern


Printer DPI and PPI Ratings, General Dots per inch stands for the maximum number of tiny spots of ink that the printer can place in a straight line where the spots are theoretically small enough (i.e. ignoring spreading or smearing effects of ink on paper) that if placed in every other such dot position leaving white space between them, the spots can be individually distinguished. Pixels per inch stands for the maximum number of unique positions in a straight line that the printer can place an ink spot under control from the outside world, namely from a computer connected to the printer. Lines per inch stands for how close thin parallel lines can be printed and still be distinguished in the finished printout. The spaces between the lines count as "lines". Pixels per inch and dots per inch originally referred to the same thing. The printer mechanism was under the direct control of the computer and was physically positioned and placed dots as directed by the computer. Back then, most printer mechanisms were limited to placing dots only in positions suggested by a grid of dots X per inch horizontally and Y per inch vertically, for example 100x100 dpi Nowadays, many printers put dots "wherever they want" as opposed to in positions suggestive of a horizontal/vertical grid. Still there is a minimum dot size and a minimum dot spacing. A picture file (image file) represents pixels in a uniform horizontal/vertical grid pattern. And the printer needs to make a finished picture of the size, say 5x7 inches, that the user chose regardless of the number of pixels in the picture file. To simplify the process of relating the pixel count in the picture file to the possibly non-uniformly spaced dots on the paper, the printer or its supporting software may generate a temporary intermediate picture file with a set number of pixels per inch. The printer may have, internally, several choices of ratio of pixels to dots and the published rating can be the largest ratio except that the published rating may not exceed the dpi rating. Therefore there might be three "per inch" values involved at a given time, the pixels of the original picture file, the pixels per inch that the printer works with, and the dots per inch of the printer mechanism. Pixels per inch is usually not mentioned with printers. All printers come with their own software (including parts called drivers) to install on your computer. Usually the software does not let you exercise control over individual dots using your picture file. Rather the printer takes your picture file or data file and uses its own built in logic to lay down the dots and create the printed output. We are led to believe that a printer's ppi is usually a fraction such as a half or a third of its dpi rating. When a temporary picture file is created, there are at least two levels of software in use. High level software (which may run in your computer) takes your picture file and creates the temporary file. Low level software runs in the printer, takes the temporary file and controls the dot size and dot placement on the paper. Sometimes a printer is advertised using a phrase such as "300 dpi 1200 dpi quality". This means that the printer has some way of making dark edges on a light background appear smoother than the first number would otherwise suggest. A printer with 300 dpi 1200 dpi quality definitely cannot resolve alternating dark and light pixels less than 1/300'th inch each. But curved and diagonal lines and color boundaries should not have jagged edges suggesting individual dots rigidly positioned on a grid with a 1/300'th inch pitch.

Oct 24, 2010 | HP LaserJet 3050 All-In-One Printer

2 Answers

Pixels per inch


Pixels per inch (PPI) is a measure of the sharpness

Apr 05, 2010 | Dell GX270 P4 256/40/48X/XPP/NONE...

1 Answer

Pixelates when zooming or printing


Increase the resolution to 300 in image size menu

Mar 18, 2008 | Adobe Photoshop CS2 for PC

2 Answers

Canon 5D resolution question


The 5D has a 12.8 mega pixel sensor.

2 x 4 ft. is 24 x 48 inches, so you have to cover 1152 sq. inches using 12.5 million pixels.

Spreading 12.5 million pixels over 1152 sq. inches means 10,850 pixels per sq. inch. Taking the square root gives you a maximium resolution of 104 pixels per inch (or 'dpi')

Photoshop will allow you to increase the resolution by a process known as 'interpolation' .. increasing to 300 dpi using Photoshop before printing will give a better result.

NB. Depending on your printing process, you may end up dealing with files up to 500Mb in size ....

Mar 12, 2008 | Canon EOS-5D Digital Camera

1 Answer

What are high resolution and standard resolution?


All pictures have 24-bit pixel depth, or 16 million colors at 144 dots per inch. The high resolution setting produces a standard size photo, 4.44" x 3.33" at 640 x 480 pixels. A wallet size photo of 2.22" x 1.67" at 320 x 240 pixels is produced using the standard resolution setting. Example: A picture with dimensions of 4.44" x 3.33" at a pixel count of 640 x 480 will have the same dpi as the same picture at a 320 x 240 pixel count with dimensions of 2.22" x 1.67" (dpi=144 x 144 or 20736 pixels per square inch). The larger picture will have a much higher resolution due to the fact that four times the pixels will define the same section of the picture in the larger photograph.

Sep 12, 2005 | Epson PhotoPC 500 Digital Camera

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