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Center point scope serial no 09-081149 what size is it

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It should be printed right on the scope. Provide us with that information and we may be able to explain it to you.

Posted on Jun 23, 2014

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How to reset bushnell elevation adjustment to zero?


If you want to center the cross hair in the scope
Rotate elevation down to it stops then count up clicks to it stops then half number and rotate down that number then repeat with windage or you could use two v blocks and view a point through the scope and rotate scope and adjust cross hair until no deviation from a fixed point up or down left or right
Hope this helps

Dec 07, 2014 | Bushnell Optics

1 Answer

Need to know model scope is. serial #09-0801149


I'd call the company. We have no way to find out the size from just the serial number.

Apr 18, 2014 | Centerpoint Technologies Center Point...

1 Answer

Can't get any adjustment up or down


Sometime the factory set is pretty tight. You might need a bigger driver to loosen the screw.

Sep 19, 2013 | Centerpoint Technologies Center Point...

1 Answer

I need a new battery cap for my Center Point Scope. I need the cost and where to e-mail this information. Please answer as soon as possible! John H. Norman, Jr. 470 Parkway Road Tullahoma, Tennessee...


Hello jno... Here is the contact info for this company.

CenterPoint™ Hunting and Outdoors
7629 Routes 5 & 20
Bloomfield, NY 14469
1-866-726-1122

Call them directly and tell them what you need. Joe

Thanks for choosing Fixya!

Mar 04, 2011 | Centerpoint Technologies Center Point...

1 Answer

Just had a konusmotor 500 telescope and have built it to the instructions, but nothing on how to use. only a beginner but how do you increase the size of the object you are looking at,eg the moon looks the...


Are you viewing the moon through the small finder scope on top of the main tube? That is only used for aiming the scope, and has very little magnification. The moon should fill the field of view on even the lowest magnification on the main scope.

A reflector type scope has the eyepiece mount on the side of the main tube, near the top end, pointing into the side of the scope. This mount should have an eyepiece placed in it- use the one with the biggest number to start with (that will have the least magnification). Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope. You look into the side of the tube with this type of scope, not along it.

New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. This scope has a motor to track the scope and keep objects in view, but you will have to get the scope set up for that for it to work correctly. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece to start. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 22, 2011 | Konusmotor 500 (230 x 114mm) Telescope

1 Answer

How to use the BDC on my rifle scope



  1. Step 1 Take a rifle with a properly installed BDC bullet drop compensating reticle to a rifle range. Using ear protection zero the scope reticle so that the point of impact corresponds to the center of the cross hairs at the distance you have selected - typically 100 or 200 yds.
  2. Step 2 Determine the trajectory of the specific cartridge you have selected. There are several ways to do this. Ammo manufacturers publish trajectory and wind drift information. There are web based ballistic calculators like http://www.biggameinfo.com/BalCalc.aspx which will tell you how much your bullet drops at known distances.
  3. Step 3 Scope manufacturers like Leupold can be a valuable source of information about their reticle: "Leupold® Ballistic Aiming System: Boone and Crockett Club® Big Game Reticle aiming system provides a series of additional aiming points to improve your ability to shoot accurately at longer ranges. Nikon2_bing.gif also provides good information suggesting the marks on their reticle be used for zero at 100yds followed by circles below representing 200, 300, 400 and 500 yds if the cartridge travels around 2800 ft per sec. Nikon suggests the center cross hair be zeroed at 200 yds for magnum calibers traveling around 3000 ft per sec. We understant that each variation of different bullet weight and powder charge changes trajectory and a scope manufacturer can not build a different reticle for each different cartridge made so practice on the range to determine how well the marks relate to the actual impact of where your bullet strikes at a know distance is important. The one thing that people using BDC scopes typically have problems with is that a BDC scope has the reticle in the second focal plane of the scope. If the reticle was in the first focal plane of the scope the reticle would look smaller on low powers like 3x and grow proportionately larger as the power increased to say 9x top power. The problem is that while the marks on the BDC reticle correspond accurately to the bullet drop at the know distances 200, 300yds etc. What happens when you lower the power from the scopes maximum power to any other lower power is the reticle stays the same size and the field of view within the scope increases which means that the distance between these marks on the BDC reticle no longer corresponds to the point where the bullet will strike. In short BDC reticles only work at the maximum power of the scope or at a set specific power. At all other powers these BDC reticles do not accurately represent where the bullet will strike.
  4. Step 4 The center X always remains the same. If you zero at 100 yards and you know that your bullet drops 8 inches at 300 yards you could forget about the BDC marks and hold the center X 8 inches high - that works at any power 3x or 9x and should be used at lower powers. If you zero the center crosshair at 100yds and have the BDC scope at the maximum power 9X then the first line or circle below the center X should be the mark you place on the center of the 200 yard target----- the bullet strike should hit the center. If by some chance you put the scope on 3x and placed that first mark below the center cross hair on that 200 yard target you would shoot over the top of the target. This is because as the power of the scope decreases the field of view increases the angle increase and gets wider. You can experiment with known power settings and see at a specific power say 3x what that first circle down corresponds to and make notes because at any set power what the marks correspond to will be repeatable.
I got this from a website, hope it helps.

Apr 08, 2010 | Hammers Air Gun Rifle Scope 3-7x20 With...

1 Answer

What is the distance between the center reticle and the point where the lines thicken on the Leupold VX-III 6.5-20-40mm scope? (in terms of viewing a target at 100 yrds.)


This area is about the size of the kill zone of your typical white tail deer, about 18 inches at 100 yards. Try with a paper plate out at 100 yards and see how it fits inside this part of your cross hairs. Or use a life sized deer target for reference. Then use go up in power to see it work.

Feb 10, 2010 | Leupold VX-III 6.5-20x40mm Long Range...

1 Answer

How do you set a center point scope


the way i tell the guys to set there scopes up is this,,,first clamp the gun in a gun vice, fit scope or in your case a center point,,,aim at the target down the barrel then fire the rifle at target card,,,(a big one) at no more than 20yds away, look for the strike mark,,,and without moving the gun at all, after firing the first round, move the scope so that the cross or center point is over the hole in the target,,,then repeat this lot again till you have the bullet hitting were you point the cross, all you need to do then is move the target back and lower thee point of aim on the scope as it should be shooting at the moon

Nov 10, 2009 | Crosman Optics

1 Answer

I am trying to bore sight a rifle with a center point 4x16x40 and i run out of adjustment to get the lazer to align with the cross hairs


When bore sighting you need to adjust in small steps and "TAP" the bore or the main body of your scope to cause a golt, as when shooting your gun it will kick and cause the scope cross hairs to take their set.  Tap it with a med sized screw driver handle. Make a small adjustment and tap it, adjust and tap. 

Sep 23, 2009 | Centerpoint Technologies CenterPoint...

1 Answer

Seting a scope


Theoretically, point of impact should not change if you change the xoom.In practice it sometimes does, but rarely to a noticable extent. 25 yards is about right for most pellet guns.BBs ane well known for curving and hooking, less so with pellets.Try different brands of pellets to see which ones work best in your gun.Lube the bore with an oily patch before shooting for best results.Enjoy

Mar 25, 2009 | Tasco Target/Varmint 6-24x42mm Rifle Scope...

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