Question about Jl Audio E6450 Car Audio Amplifier

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Friend adjusted 'boost' screws inside amp

Now doesnt sound as loud and distorts sound as sterio playing music seems to 'clip' before 50 volume on radio. WHAT ARE THEY SUPPOSED TO BE SET AS FROM THE FACTORY SHOW ME PLEASE I WANT IT TO SOUND LIKE IT DID BEFORE HE 'TUNED UP' MY AMP!!! I TOLD HIM TO DRAW PIC WHERE THEY WERE SET BEFORE HE DID THIS AND OF COURSE HE DIDN'T REMEMBER WHERE THEY WERE EXACTLY SET AT.

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SOURCE: sleuthing a 300/4 low-ohm issue. 300/4

Are you sure you getting enough power to push everything. I have seen when the voltage is too low coming in, the amps will shut down so they don't overheat. Once they've cooled off and the volume level is lowered they will kick in again. Low voltage and a heavy draw will create massive amounts of heat.

Posted on May 25, 2011

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When setting up xr8600 is it best to start mains and monitors master at 0DB?


1. Turn the main and monitor volumes all the way down (off). Plug a cd player into channel 9/10 and play a track of music of your liking. With the main/monitor volumes still off, adjust the gain on 9/10 until the clip light turns on, then back it down until the clip light just turns off. Put the channel volume at 12 o' clock.
2. With the music still playing, turn up the mains to the desired listening level first, and then adjust the graphic eq until the music sounds good in the room. Remember or mark the position of the volume control. Do not use the channel eq on 9/10 for music that has been mastered properly, leave the eq flat. Once this step is completed then you have now set the main eq.
3. Repeat the same for monitors. Turn off the main volume and then bring up the monitor main volume to the desired level first, then set eq. Now your monitor eq is set properly. Remember or mark the position of the monitor volume.
4. Set up microphone - plug a mic into channel 1 with volume all the way down. Speak or sing into the microphone and adjust the GAIN until you see the clip light, then back down a litttle on the gain. Put the monitor and main volumes back up to the mark from step 2. Now adjust the volume and monitor send on the mic channel to the desired loudness first before adjusting the mic channel eq. Use subtractive eq method to minimize distortion and feedback. ...i.e. if the mic is bassy then turn down the lows, do not ADD highs. If the mic needs bass, turn down the highs.

Jun 08, 2014 | Peavey Xr 8600 8 Channel Powered Mixer

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How to set gain controls on you car audio amplifier


HOW TO SET GAINS

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The ADD version -

1. Play a typically loud music CD in your headunit. Set volume to 75%. Wear ear protection.
2. Starting with the amp gains at their lowest setting, slowly raise one gain at a time until you hear clipping from the corresponding speaker. This will sound like audible distortion.
3. Once you've found the clipping point, back the gain down until you no longer hear the distortion.
4. Repeat for any addt'l gains on the amp/amps.
5. Your new maximum volume setting on the headunit is 75%, never exceed that for happy, healthy speaker life.

(This is the quick & dirty method, it'll get you 80% to proper settings. Read on for the other 20%.)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


How to do things right -

What's gain?
Also known as input sensitivity, gains are the small, typically recessed "volume knobs" on most equipment between the speakers & the headunit. All amps have them, also many EQ's, line output converters, some crossovers.

What's it for?
The idea is to properly match the output from different pieces of gear so that each communicates the cleanest signal to the other, resulting in maximum performance and minimal noise & risk of damage.

Know your enemy - Clipping.
Clipping is the tech term for the distortion that occurs when an amplifier is pushed beyond it's capabilities. In simple terms it sounds like significant distortion of the musical peaks. So for instance a big drum strike will sound muddy or distorted when turned up, but remains clear at a lower volume. That's clipping. What's happening is the amp momentarily runs out of power.

To properly understand this w/o an engineering degree you need to know the difference between constant power (RMS) and peak power. Constant power, very simply, is the amount of juice your amp can produce consistantly. Since there are some standards for measuring this it is one of the few benchmarks we have for amplifiers. But since sound waves are exactly that - waves, with peaks & valleys - understand that an amp's output is never constant, it has to increase & decrease with the music signal.

The amp's "reserve power" is what it uses to deal with the peaks in the music. This is called peak power, or my favorite, headroom. Headroom is typically about twice the RMS power of an amp, but can only be sustained for a few milliseconds before the amp gets totally winded.

So a good way to think of this is a 10 yr old jumping on a bed - that's the music signal. The bed is the amp's RMS power, the ceiling above is the headroom limit. If the kid jumps too high he whacks his head - that's clipping. Do it a couple times & he'll survive. Do it repeatedly & there WILL be permanant damage. This is the single biggest speaker killer out there.

So the object of the game is to adjust the bed height (by using the gains) to the right height so the kid can jump around like a caffeinated monkey without ever whacking into the ceiling. So setting the gains properly allows you to get the amp's maximum output without overtaxing the equipment. With me so far?

A few other basics -
To do this properly you'll need a few things:

Ear protection. Stuff some cotton in your ears if you don't have anything better.

A test CD with a sine wave set to 0db, a 50-80hz stereo tone is ideal. This is important - it's far more accurate than using a music CD. You can purchase these at most any guitar or pro music stores, Amazon, or download a program to make your own. Making your own isn't recommended since there are a lot of variables in computers that can affect the final product.

If you have a crossover, you'll need test tones within the frequency range for each amp. For instance if you have a dedicated sub amp crossed over at 80hz, get a 60hz test tone. For your mains, work with a 120hz tone. If you have a 3-way or more crossover, adjust appropriately, just be sure the test frequency is within the bounds of the speaker range. Test each frequency seperately.

Fader, tone controls, loudness/expansion, etc.
Ideally you'll have the sound from your headunit/EQ completely flat on a normal basis. If so, be sure everything's this way before you test. However, if you KNOW you'll have the bass boost activated, some sort of expansion, or the tone controls preset in some way then go ahead & set them before you test.

Otherwise it's best to have everything flat. If you choose to adjust the tone controls later & leave them that way you can always repeat the process. Regardless, be sure the fader & balance are zeroed out.

Dedicated sub volume controls
A lot of amps have outboard sub volume knobs & headunits frequently have dedicated internal sub volume adjustments. If you plan on using these they should be maxed before setting your gains. If you're not going to use them, best to de-activate them.

Set all amp gains to their lowest point before starting. Usually full counter-clockwise.

Input sensitivity switches
If your amp has a selector switch for different input sensitivities, start by setting it to the highest setting. These are typically expressed in voltages, for example .2-1v, 1-3v, 3-8v. Start with the higher numbers (ex. 3-8v) (lowest sensitivity). If you can't get the amp to clip at those settings, try the next one down until you find the clipping point. You can disregard generally what the markings themselves say since there's no real standard for measuring that stuff. Never trust your system's well-being to those voltage numbers, they're just a guideline best ignored.

Work with one gain at a time.
For example, if you have a L&R gain for your front speakers, you'll be working with each side seperately. If multiple amps, unplug all but the amp you're working with. If a 4+ channel amp, typically you'll have only a single L & R gain, so treat it like a 2 channel. If it has more gains, isolate each & adjust seperately.

Play your test tone thru the headunit. Adjust your headunit volume to 75% of max.
This doesn't need to be precise, just be sure you know where this setting is b/c it's now the HIGHEST you'll ever turn up the volume on the headunit.

(But the amps go to 11...! You're using 75% volume because some CD's will be louder than others. Also b/c there's a small amp in the headunit that will clip if pushed too far. Trust me on this one.)

Now turn up the gain you're working with until you hear the tone quality change - it'll be a distinct change in the tone, there will be distortion. This is where your amp clips. Now turn the gain back down to just below where that distortion occurs. That gain's now set. Repeat for all other gains. Repeat for all other amps.


Final tweaking -
Have an EQ? Want to use the "loudness" button? Want to adjust the bass/mid/treble controls? If you're making minor tweaks (+/-1) there's no real need to worry about gains. If you're talking about bigger changes (+4/-3, etc) you may want to run the tones again to be sure you're still set right.

Also now that the gains are properly set you can adjust them DOWN to balance your system. Need more front volume but don't have a fader? Turn down the rear gains. Sub underpowered? Turn down the mains. The important thing is to never turn them UP from where they are, just down.


A few other notes -

Can't I just use an O-scope or DMM to set gains?
Sure, IF you know the exact output (rarely the rated output) of your amp and you're a freakin' genius with your toys. Generally more accurate & far easier to use your ears.

What about the gains on the EQ/X-over/line-output converter?
Ooh, good question. The general idea here is to follow the same process but use the gains that are the furthest UPSTREAM (I.E. closest to the headunit) and set all the others to their lowest setting. This will send the hottest signal possible thru all the components. Just remember that anywhere the signal splits you'll have to set them there also. For example, if you have a LOC & an outboard crossover you'll need to set gains on both, starting with the LOC. This can get tricky. Let your ears guide you.

What if my headunit says "9v output" and the amp only says "5v input?"
Eh, doesn't really matter. Again, there isn't really any set standard for measuring this stuff & it's usually just marketing. Also remember that music is a wave, not a line, so that rated output is usually a max, not a constant. Just set everything according to the above process, nothing changes.

on Mar 27, 2010 | Car Audio & Video

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How Loud Can it Go?


I don't know if I ever installed a sound system to any concert fan who didn't ask me this question. So how loud can I safely play my sound system?

If you have a receiver or amplifier that has an analog dial that goes from 7 o'clock to 5 o'clock the majority of units will output maximum volume at around 1 o'clock assuming a line level signal is sent to it (again it varies a lot from piece to piece). Anything higher then that and the unit will send out a distorted signal colloquially referred to as "clipping". Most modern units now use digital volume controls and everyone is different. The only way to detect this distortion is listen to when the music sounds tinny and harsh instead of clean and musical.

If you do not find it is loud enough for your liking you must invest in a more powerful amplifier or higher efficiency speakers; or you will continue to destroy your innocent speakers and blame them for your over driven amplifier.

on Jan 27, 2010 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

PA speakers distort even at low volume


Firstly check if you R getting clipping at the input ,if U have it, then lower the vol of the music source andif their is no clipping at the source then U must have you speakers checked for it may have some voice coils burnt .with best wishes .system tech.

Apr 13, 2014 | Yamaha S215V Main / Stereo Speaker

1 Answer

What frequency do i need to have my speakers on??


Different speakers perform better under different frequencies.
The sound you receive also depends on the box you use, and the type of car its in. In my opinion the best sound is what "I like" not what others set.
There is two ways of finding your optimum settings.
But my favorite way is to do the following.
1) Set every frequency on radio, preamp, cross over to amp and 0.
2) Turn the volume to about 50% - 75% using a song with different types of base.
3)Adjust your base gain, sonic, boost, punch or what ever settings until it sounds it's deepest. Don't over do the gain or base boost.
4)Adjust the other setting to fine tune clear sound.
5)Add the highs to see if they match up.
6)Now fine tune the amps but remember you should only need to bring the gain up or down because you had already found your deepest base. This should be the last amp adjustment unless u realize u want it lower or higher.
7)Adjusting the equalizer or EQ on the sterio will depend on the song your playing.
Note: It's best to max out at about 80%-90% sterio volume.
"I max out at 60%, but that's because I don't like twisting and twisting to get my sound up or down." One twist and im setting off car alarms.

Mar 16, 2010 | Car Audio & Video

1 Answer

Itunes music sounds distorted somtimes and not others


The fault is from your laptop speaker. I think it has a hole inside and maybe that's why it distorts. Or maybe the sound/volume is too loud and the speaker does not have the capacity.

I would advice you to get an external speaker for your laptop.

Take care.

Dec 01, 2009 | Acer Aspire 5600 Series 5630-6951 Laptop

2 Answers

My subwoofers don't perform consistantly. Sometimes they work flawlessly, other times they make a loud thumping that is not coming from the music (but it does interfere with the music). To be more...


Try turning the gain, or output level down on the amp, if that doesnt solve the problem then check the aux wires and the remote wire for shorts...

Aug 06, 2009 | Car Audio & Video

1 Answer

What duz level adjustment do


Hello,

The level control controls the input level coming from your head unit (receiver) to the amp.

Your Sony users manual is a little vague on how to best adjust the level and other controls.

Here is one method that some installers use and works well with most amps.

Most 10" subs sound best between about 80-100hz and below, so start out by setting the LPF at about 80hz. The HPF will not be used. Next turn the bass boost and gain all the way down. Turn on the radio and set all tone controls, bass, midrange, treble to flat, usually "0" on most head units. Turn the volume up to approximately 3/4 volume level or just until you begin to hear distortion. Now, back the volume down until the distortion is gone. Next turn up the gain control on the amp until you hear the subs start to distort then back the gain down until the distortion disappears. Next turn the bass boost up again until the subs begin to distort, then either back the bass boost down or back the gain down until the distortion is gone. You may need to play around with the bass boost and gain controls to get exactly the sound you prefer.

Hope this helps.

Mar 28, 2009 | Sony Xplod 1100 Watt Max 10" Subwoofer,...

1 Answer

Poor sound/ Unable to play anything load without distortion.


i can tell you right now base on the vehicle you have a bad system hook wosrt if you are using factory head unit

Mar 25, 2009 | Kenwood KAC-8151D Car Audio Amplifier

1 Answer

My amp won't play distortion.


Hello all you have to do is turn your master volume down to just barley on then turn your pre amp volume somwhere about 2:oclock depending on how much distortion you want ajust your volume on your guitar a little past halfway to give yourself some headroom in case you need to turn up some while you are playing! just think of it as your guitar is your first pre-amp then your amp is second preamp in line ,that is your over drive ,then the master volume is how loud you want the overall volume i hope this help's ya!

Dec 26, 2008 | Peavey Audio Players & Recorders

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