Question about Freezers

1 Answer

How do you gain access to the thermostat and defrost element

There is an ice build up and the tube that runs down to the evaporator tray on the top of the compressor freezes up

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Night Owl:

    An expert who has answered 10 or more questions between 12 midnight and 6am on the same day.

    Hot-Shot:

    An expert who has answered 20 questions.

  • Contributor
  • 50 Answers

You have to remove everything from the freezer and remove the back panel, usually has 4 to 6 screws and your thermostat has 2 wires going to it and is clipped on the line going to the coil. The element is under the coil with a wire on both ends. If you have a multi meter you can check both. The element should read close to 0 if it is good,if it is bad the meter will not change reading when a leads off the meter are attached to both ends. the thermostat is checked the same way except if at room temp it will not show a reading and if you put it in a glass of ice water when it reaches around 32 degrees it should read 0 or close if it does not then it needs replaced. hope this helps

Posted on Apr 17, 2014

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Ice forms on the bottom. Looks like an iceberg


DEFROST PROBLEM
The evaporator coil behind the cover on the back wall inside the freezer will ice up under normal conditions. Every 8 to 10 hours for around 20 minutes the defrost timer (or in most newer models the electronic adaptive defrost control) will turn the defrost heater on to melt the built up ice. There is a defrost thermostat which prevents the heater from overheating the freezer by breaking the heater circuit when the temp reaches close to 32 degrees F. The entire cooling system shuts off during the defrost cycle and starts back when the timer advances through the cycle.

If this ice is not melted it will continue to build up until the air can't flow over the coil to circulate the cold air through the freezer and into the fridge. The temperature change in the fridge is usually noticed first followed by the freezer.

If the defrost thermostat is bad, it can prevent the heater from coming on OR it won't turn the heater off when it gets too warm. It is clamped to the evaporator coil at the top to sense the temp. If it appears to be misshapen it is bad.
With an ohm meter it should show continuity when cold and none when warm.
You can also bypass(disconnect the two wires plugged into it and twist them together) the thermostat to see if the heater comes on then. If it does then you know the thermostat is bad and needs replaced.

The defrost heater is located on the evaporator. It is in a tube which is at the bottom and can also go up the sides of the evaporator. On some types you can see a burnt spot if it's bad. With an ohm meter it should show continuity from end to end when disconnected from the wiring in the freezer. You can also test the wiring for voltage when it's in the defrost mode.

If you have a defrost timer you can test it. It can be located under the fridge behind the kick panel on the front. Some are in the fridge with the controls at the top. You can turn the defrost timer till it clicks and everything shuts down. The heater should now come on. If it does, replace the timer because that means the timer is not running. If it doesn't, check the heater and defrost thermostat. Turn the timer again till everything starts back up to end the defrost cycle.

If you have an adaptive defrost control instead of a timer, replace it if the heater and thermostat test good. It is located in the fridge with the controls in some models and on the back in others.

Jul 10, 2011 | Crosley CFUM21LW Upright Freezer

1 Answer

Ice build up in the bottom of a woods upright freezer. have romvoed ice and taken hair blower to the tube and water drains. Does not solve problem ice continues to build up


ic Defrost Thermostat
This is the component that controls how long the heater stays on when the machine is in defrost mode. Say the defrost cycle is thirty minutes, the heater may only be on for ten of those thirty minutes on the timer controls. On Adaptive Defrost Controls, when the heater shuts off, shortly after the machine exits defrost mode. Basically if the heater only stays on for ten minutes, the whole defrost cycle will only be about 12 or 13 minutes longe is continueing to build up due to one of the defrost cycle parts not fucntioning properly this is the most likely piece to be causing your ice up issue do a continuity test on the thermostat to assure that it is working properly
Basically when the heater comes on, it starts to melt the frost on the evaporator. Once all the ice and frost is gone, the temperature behind the panel will start to rise. Once the temperature behind the panel rises to a certain temperature, the thermostat will break the current of electricity going to the heater. Bam, it shuts off and prevents your freezer from becoming a sauna, or an oven. I'm sure you get the drift. The heater is on the bottom of the evaporator coils and the defrost thermostat sits on top of the evaporator coils.
Defrost Heater
This is the last component in the defrost system. This one should be pretty simple. By now if you have read this far you should already know what this does and how important is it. Some defrost heaters are a coil of wire in a glass tube under the evaporator coils. Works like a light bulb basically. The other style looks like the bake element in your stove. They both get red hot either way and melt the frost
Defrost control or timer.refrigerator-defrost-timers.jpg Some refrigerators have a defrost timer. This type works like a clock. Every eight hours or so the machine hits the defrost spot and that's when defrost occurs

Some refrigerators have an Adaptive Defrost Control. This is what makes a refrigerator energy efficient. It varys the length of time it takes the machine to go into defrost. So instead of the energy hogging heater 240545401adc-board.jpgcoming on every eight hours, it may be 24 hours, 18 hours, 10.5 hours, who knows. It depends on how many times you have opened the doors, how long the compressor has run. This is good because the refrigerator may not need to go into defrost every eight hours. Now you are saving energy.

and lastly there is the fan also if it is not working will not allow the flow of air to leave the inside of the freezer. Continuity test can also be done on the heater as well and the least likely would be the timer to go bad in some models they have a board on the back of the machine instead of a defrost timer if you have any further questions please message me back and please remember to rank how this opinion has helped as well Thanks again Rick

Jan 15, 2011 | Kenmore 16.7 cu. ft. / 473 liter Upright...

1 Answer

Evaporator ice up and unit has a temp at 31F not going down in singles digits


Melt the iced up evaporator with a hairdryer for a temp. fix. The auto defrost system isn't working. I can't find diagrams of yours but here is basically how it works.

The evaporator coil behind the cover on the back wall inside the freezer will ice up under normal conditions. Every 8 to 10 hours for around 20 minutes the defrost timer (or in most newer models the electronic adaptive defrost control) will turn the defrost heater on to melt the built up ice. There is a defrost thermostat which prevents the heater from overheating the freezer by breaking the heater circuit when the temp reaches close to 32 degrees F. The entire cooling system shuts off during the defrost cycle and starts back when the timer advances through the cycle.

If this ice is not melted it will continue to build up until the air can't flow over the coil to circulate the cold air through the freezer and into the fridge. The temperature change in the fridge is usually noticed first followed by the freezer.

If the defrost thermostat is bad, it can prevent the heater from coming on OR it won't turn the heater off when it gets too warm. It is clamped to the evaporator coil at the top to sense the temp. If it appears to be misshapen it is bad.
With an ohm meter it should show continuity when cold and none when warm.
You can also bypass(disconnect the two wires plugged into it and twist them together) the thermostat to see if the heater comes on then. If it does then you know the thermostat is bad and needs replaced.

The defrost heater is located on the evaporator. It is in a tube which is at the bottom and can also go up the sides of the evaporator. On some types you can see a burnt spot if it's bad. With an ohm meter it should show continuity from end to end when disconnected from the wiring in the freezer. You can also test the wiring for voltage when it's in the defrost mode.

If you have a defrost timer you can test it. It can be located under the fridge behind the kick panel on the front. Some are in the fridge with the controls at the top. You can turn the defrost timer till it clicks and everything shuts down. The heater should now come on. If it does, replace the timer because that means the timer is not running. If it doesn't, check the heater and defrost thermostat. Turn the timer again till everything starts back up to end the defrost cycle.

If you have an adaptive defrost control instead of a timer, replace it if the heater and thermostat test good. It is located in the fridge with the controls in some models and on the back in others.

Jan 09, 2011 | Traulsen RLT232NUTHHS Commercial Freezer

1 Answer

Ice up on the coil


DEFROST PROBLEM The evaporator coil behind the cover on the back wall inside the freezer will ice up under normal conditions. Every 8 to 10 hours for around 20 minutes the defrost timer (or in most newer models the electronic adaptive defrost control) will turn the defrost heater on to melt the built up ice. There is a defrost thermostat which prevents the heater from overheating the freezer by breaking the heater circuit when the temp reaches close to 32 degrees F. The entire cooling system shuts off during the defrost cycle and starts back when the timer advances through the cycle.
If this ice is not melted it will continue to build up until the air can’t flow over the coil to circulate the cold air through the freezer and into the fridge. The temperature change in the fridge is usually noticed first followed by the freezer.
If the defrost thermostat is bad, it can prevent the heater from coming on OR it won’t turn the heater off when it gets too warm. It is clamped to the evaporator coil at the top to sense the temp. If it appears to be misshapen it is bad. With an ohm meter it should show continuity when cold and none when warm. You can also bypass(disconnect the two wires plugged into it and twist them together) the thermostat to see if the heater comes on then. If it does then you know the thermostat is bad and needs replaced.
The defrost heater is located on the evaporator. It is in a tube which is at the bottom and can also go up the sides of the evaporator. On some types you can see a burnt spot if it’s bad. With an ohm meter it should show continuity from end to end when disconnected from the wiring in the freezer. You can also test the wiring for voltage when it’s in the defrost mode.
If you have a defrost timer you can test it. It can be located under the fridge behind the kick panel on the front. Some are in the fridge with the controls at the top. You can turn the defrost timer till it clicks and everything shuts down. The heater should now come on. If it does, replace the timer because that means the timer is not running. If it doesn't, check the heater and defrost thermostat. Turn the timer again till everything starts back up to end the defrost cycle.
If you have an adaptive defrost control instead of a timer, replace it if the heater and thermostat test good. It is located in the fridge with the controls in some models and on the back in others.

Jul 20, 2010 | Hoshizaki 48.5 cu. ft. / 1373 liter...

1 Answer

My freezer has begun to collect ice in the bottom of the freezer compartment. We clean it out and then it comes back, building up over a few days. There have been no spills in the freezer and the...


A couple of things can be the source of your problem.

1. The cabinet drain from the evaporator coils can be clogged or iced over. The 60 deg F thermostat is well above this drain and can cycle the defrost timer even if this drain is obstructed.

2. You could very well have an auto deftosting problem with your unit. I.e it is not defrosting at all and the ice build up you see is a result of that.

a. Possible causes

1) Defrost timer
2) 60 Deg F cycle thermostat
3) Heating element
4) wiring


3. You can have an evaporator fan that is not running at full speed or not running at all.

These are the most common problems but there are rare occasions when something as simple as a badly torn door seal can cause the exact symptom you described.


4. You also did not mention if you had an icemaker or not. A leaking / opverflowing / frozen inlet on the TOP rear of the icemaker can also cause this.

Jan 21, 2010 | Freezers

1 Answer

Freezer won't freeze



If the evaporator coils behind the back panel of the freezer are icing up because of auto defrost failure that will stop the circulation of cold air and eventually affect the freezer too.
The evaporator coil behind the cover on the back wall inside the freezer will ice up under normal conditions. Every 8 to 10 hours for around 20 minutes the defrost timer (or in most newer models the electronic adaptive defrost control) will turn the defrost heater on to melt the built up ice. There is a defrost thermostat which prevents the heater from overheating the freezer by breaking the heater circuit when the temp reaches close to 32 degrees F. The entire cooling system shuts off during the defrost cycle and starts back when the timer advances through the cycle.

If this ice is not melted it will continue to build up until the air can’t flow over the coil to circulate the cold air through the freezer and into the fridge. The temperature change in the fridge is usually noticed first followed by the freezer.

If the defrost thermostat is bad it can prevent the heater from coming on OR it won’t turn the heater off when it gets too warm. It is clamped to the evaporator coil at the top to sense the temp. If it appears to be misshapen it is bad.
With an ohm meter it should show continuity when cold and none when warm.
You can also bypass the thermostat to see if the heater comes on then. If it does then you know the thermostat is bad and needs replaced.

The defrost heater is located on the evaporator. It is in a tube which is at the bottom and can also go up the sides of the evaporator. On some types you can see a burnt spot if it’s bad. With an ohm meter it should show continuity from end to end when disconnected from the wiring in the freezer. You can also test the wiring for voltage when it’s in the defrost mode.

If you have a defrost timer you can test it. It can be located under the fridge behind the kick panel on the front. Some are in the fridge with the controls at the top. You can turn the defrost timer till it clicks and everything shuts down. The heater should now come on. If it does, replace the timer because that means the timer is not running. If it doesn't, check the heater and defrost thermostat. Turn the timer again till everything starts back up to end the defrost cycle.

If you have an adaptive defrost control instead of a timer, replace it if the heater and thermostat test good. It is located in the fridge with the controls in some models and on the back in others.

Nov 08, 2009 | Frigidaire Freezers

1 Answer

Electrolux premier eco freezer leaking. Water appearing on the floor. Ice building up inside the freezer.


Your evaporator coils frost up in normal use and every eight hours or so the entire unit shuts down and the defrost heater comes on to melt the frost. This cycle last about 20 minutes. The melted frost drips into a drain pan and through a drain tube to the drain tray under the freezer/refrigerator where it's evaporated by the condenser fan.


Your drain tube may be stopped up with ice at the upper end because it drains too slow because it's stopped up at the lower end in the evaporator pan under the unit at the floor. It can get dust and mold in it. Once you get the ice out at the top a little pressure with a turkey baster will usually clear it out. Flushing it out with hot water and clorox may help

Oct 11, 2009 | Freezers

2 Answers

My upright freezer won't self defrost. Frost builds up right awa


The evaporator coil behind the cover on the back wall inside the freezer will ice up under normal conditions. Every 8 to 10 hours for around 20 minutes the defrost timer (or in most newer models the electronic adaptive defrost control) will turn the defrost heater on to melt the built up ice. There is a defrost thermostat which prevents the heater from overheating the freezer by breaking the heater circuit when the temp reaches close to 32 degrees F. The entire cooling system shuts off during the defrost cycle and starts back when the timer advances through the cycle.

If this ice is not melted it will continue to build up until the air can’t flow over the coil to circulate the cold air through the freezer and into the fridge. The temperature change in the fridge is usually noticed first followed by the freezer.

If the defrost thermostat is bad it can prevent the heater from coming on OR it won’t turn the heater off when it gets too warm. It is clamped to the evaporator coil at the top to sense the temp. If it appears to be misshapen it is bad.
With an ohm meter it should show continuity when cold and none when warm.
You can also bypass the thermostat to see if the heater comes on then. If it does then you know the thermostat is bad and needs replaced.

The defrost heater is located on the evaporator. It is in a tube which is at the bottom and can also go up the sides of the evaporator. On some types you can see a burnt spot if it’s bad. With an ohm meter it should show continuity from end to end when disconnected from the wiring in the freezer. You can also test the wiring for voltage when it’s in the defrost mode.

If you have a defrost timer you can test it. It can be located under the fridge behind the kick panel on the front. Some are in the fridge with the controls at the top. You can turn the defrost timer till it clicks and everything shuts down. The heater should now come on. If it does, replace the timer because that means the timer is not running. If it doesn't, check the heater and defrost thermostat. Turn the timer again till everything starts back up to end the defrost cycle.

If you have an adaptive defrost control instead of a timer, replace it if the heater and thermostat test good. It is located in the fridge with the controls in some models and on the back in others.

If you need help finding your model number see here> http://www.appliancepartspros.com/modelnumber_locator.aspx

To locate your timer, motherboard, control or adaptive defrost control , enter your model number and search for the part or post back on Fixya.
http://www.searspartsdirect.com/partsdirect/index.action?psid=26129238&sid=PSx20071217x00001a

Sep 19, 2009 | Kenmore 13.7 cu. ft. / 388 liter Upright...

1 Answer

Panel is hot and freezer does not work!


Check the condenser fan underneath the unit accessable form the back behind the cardboard cover. It should be running when the compressor runs. OR Check the evaporator behind the rear cover inside the freezer. Check for ice build up. . Light frost everywhere(NORMAL) or a partial pattern of ice(LOW ON FREON) or nothing(LOW FREON OR COMPRESSOR PROBLEM).
If the evaporator coils behind the back panel of the freezer are icing up because of auto defrost failure that will stop the circulation of cold air and eventually affect the freezer too.

check defrost timer, defrost heater, defrost thermostat. In most newer models the timer has been replaced by an electronic control board. If the heater and thermostat are ok it’ll be the control

Sep 09, 2009 | Freezers

7 Answers

Ice build up in my frost free upright freezer


I looked at the BACK at the bottom underneath of my Sears Kenmore frost free upright freezer and what was causing the ice buildup was very simple. At the factory, the assembler looped the little hose too high and when the water went into the hose it could not get out due to being too high in one spot! An ice dam will form, blocking ALL water coming through
and freezing up any more water coming down giving you a HUGE wad of ice that is scary!!! I just removed the screw holding the loop that holds the hose and put a bit of warm water down the little hole on the INSIDE (Behind the grate) to melt the remaining ice in the tube.You need to take out 4 screws and remove the grate to see this. I could not believe that this was the problem! I haven't had any ice build up since.Now don't tear your freezer apart before you try this trying to fix the compressor, thermostat etc. It may be the only thing wrong with it!

Nov 11, 2006 | Kenmore 16.7 cu. ft. / 473 liter Upright...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Freezers Logo

Related Topics:

201 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Freezers Experts

Dennis Boxerman

Level 3 Expert

1070 Answers

AJMAL KHAN

Level 2 Expert

382 Answers

John Tripp
John Tripp

Level 3 Expert

4654 Answers

Are you a Freezer Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...