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Does not read map - Garmin Gpsmap 4008

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Smog code p0108


this is for the MAP sensor , it can also be a wiring fault and not the actual sensor so i've copied and pasted to save time a guide
Symptoms Possible sumptoms of OBD code P0108
MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) will likely be on Engine may run poorly Engine may not run at all Fuel mileage may decrease Presence of black smoke at exhaust
Causes Possible causes of OBD code P0108
Bad MAP sensor Leak in vacuum supply line to MAP sensor Engine vacuum leak Short on signal wire to PCM Short on reference voltage wire from PCM Open in ground circuit to MAP Worn engine causing low vacuum
Possible Solutions A good way to diagnose if the MAP sensor is to blame would be to compare the KOEO (key on engine off) MAP sensor reading on a scan tool with the Barometric pressure reading. They should be the same because they both measure atmospheric pressure. If the MAP reading is greater than 0.5 volt off of the BARO reading, then replacing the MAP sensor would likely fix the problem. Otherwise, start the engine and observe the MAP reading at idle. It should normally be about 1.5 volts (varies according to altitude). a. If it is, the problem is likely intermittent. Check all the vacuum hoses for damage and replace as necessary. You can also try wiggle testing the harness and connector to reproduce the problem. b. If the scan tool MAP reading is more than 4.5 volts, check the actual engine vacuum reading with the engine running. If it is less than 15 or 16 in. Hg, then the PCM is probably not seeing enough vacuum (due to a worn engine, perhaps) for a given operating condition (which causes a higher than normal voltage signal to the PCM) and setting the code. Repair the engine vacuum problem and retest. c. But, if the actual engine vacuum reading is 16 in. Hg or more, then unplug the MAP sensor. The scan tool MAP reading should indicate that there is no voltage present. Check that the ground from the PCM is intact and also that the MAP sensor connector and terminals are tight. If the connection is good, then replace the map sensor. d. However if, with KOEO, & the MAP sensor unplugged, the scan tool shows a voltage reading, then there may be a short in the harness to the MAP sensor. Turn the ignition off. At the PCM unplug connector and remove the MAP signal wire from the connector. Re-attach the PCM connector and see if with KOEO, the scan tool MAP reading shows voltage. If it still does, replace the PCM. If not, check for voltage on the signal wire you just removed from the PCM. If there is voltage on the signal wire, find the short in the harness and repair.

hope this helps

Jul 08, 2014 | 2001 Pontiac Sunfire

2 Answers

DTC code P109


It states 94 cadi and it is not OBD2 so the code is P109 and not P0109.
your information is incorrect.
P109 and p052 is internal to PCM ck sum issues, Possible due to battery connections loss of voltage.

Jun 22, 2012 | 1994 Cadillac Seville

1 Answer

P0108 engine light


Hi there:
DTC P0108 - Manifold Absolute Pressure/BARO Sensor High Input




Check the potential causes of a P0108 code:

Bad MAP sensor
Leak in vacuum supply line to MAP sensor
Engine vacuum leak
Short on signal wire to PCM
Short on reference voltage wire from PCM
Open in ground circuit to MAP
Worn engine causing low vacuum


Now, about the possible solutions... a good way to diagnose if the MAP sensor is to blame would be to compare the KOEO (key on engine off) MAP sensor reading on a scan tool with the Barometric pressure reading. They should be the same because they both measure atmospheric pressure.

If the MAP reading is greater than 0.5 volt off of the BARO reading, then replacing the MAP sensor would likely fix the problem. Otherwise, start the engine and observe the MAP reading at idle. It should normally be about 1.5 volts (varies according to altitude).

a. If it is, the problem is likely intermittent. Check all the vacuum hoses for damage and replace as necessary. You can also try wiggle testing the harness and connector to reproduce the problem.
b. If the scan tool MAP reading is more than 4.5 volts, check the actual engine vacuum reading with the engine running. If it is less than 15 or 16 in. Hg, then the PCM is probably not seeing enough vacuum (due to a worn engine, perhaps) for a given operating condition (which causes a higher than normal voltage signal to the PCM) and setting the code. Repair the engine vacuum problem and retest.
c. But, if the actual engine vacuum reading is 16 in. Hg or more, then unplug the MAP sensor. The scan tool MAP reading should indicate that there is no voltage present. Check that the ground from the PCM is intact and also that the MAP sensor connector and terminals are tight. If the connection is good, then replace the map sensor.
d. However if, with KOEO, & the MAP sensor unplugged, the scan tool shows a voltage reading, then there may be a short in the harness to the MAP sensor. Turn the ignition off. At the PCM unplug connector and remove the MAP signal wire from the connector. Re-attach the PCM connector and see if with KOEO, the scan tool MAP reading shows voltage. If it still does, replace the PCM. If not, check for voltage on the signal wire you just removed from the PCM. If there is voltage on the signal wire, find the short in the harness and repair.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Jun 20, 2012 | 2005 Lincoln LS V8

1 Answer

95 cadillac reading code current p105 sometimes engine light comes on sometimes harder to start than normal, idles up and down up on stopping


Symptoms Symptoms of a P0105 check engine light code may include:
  • Poor running engine
  • Engine runs rich
  • Engine won't idle
  • Engine backfires through tailpipe
  • Engine misfire under load or at idle
  • MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
  • In some extreme cases there may be no symptoms other than MIL illumination
Causes A P0105 DTC could be caused by:
  • MAP sensor vacuum hose disconnected or plugged
  • Bad MAP Sensor
  • Bad TPS
  • Damaged or problematic MAP sensor connector
  • Damaged or problematic TPS connector
  • Damaged wiring
  • Short to reference voltage on signal circuit of MAP Sensor
  • Loss of ground to MAP sensor or TPS
  • Open on signal circuit of MAP sensor
  • Bad PCM
Possible Solutions Using a scanner or code reader, turn the ignition on and engine OFF; what does the MAP sensor voltage read? It should be about 4 Volts for sea level. If you are at a higher altitude, it should decrease about half a volt or so for each 1,000 ft. of altitude (this will vary from model to model) Or if you have a separate MAF (Mass air flow) sensor on your vehicle, they are usually equipped with a Barometric pressure reading. If so, the Baro reading should match the MAP reading (they both measure ambient air pressure). If they're roughly equal, then, check for Freeze Frame data of the MAP sensor (if available).
NOTE: Freeze Frame data is the PCM recording a fault when it happens. It captures the readings of the various PIDS (parameter identifiers)available to troubleshoot what happened. It's like a recording of the problem as it happened. At idle a typical MAP sensor Voltage reading should be about a volt, and at WOT (wide open throttle) it should approach 4.5 to 5 Volts. As for the TPS, at idle, the voltage reading is about 1 Volt or less. As the throttle is opened the reading will increase to 4.5 Volts at WOT. Do the two readings make sense? For example, if the TPS reading on Freeze Frame data shows 2.5 Volts (indicating partial throttle) does the MAP sensor indicate a reading that isn't at either extreme? Using the Freeze Frame data (if available) compare the MAP reading to the TPS when the problem occurred. This can help you identify what happened
If you have no access to Freeze Frame data then check if the MAP sensor voltage changes when you apply vacuum to it. You can do this by mouth or a vacuum pump. The voltage should increase as you apply vacuum. If the reading doesn't change as you apply vacuum, make sure there are no obstructions in the hose to the sensor. If the hose is clear, the MAP sensor is usually bad, but it doesn't rule out the following from causing the problem: Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at less than .5 Volts? Then:
NOTE: This code shouldn't set if the MAP is stuck at extremely low voltage, however, I'm adding it in because there's no way to know for certain for which vehicles a low voltage condition may set a P0105
  1. Inspect the wiring harness and MAP sensor connector. Repair any damage
  2. Unplug the MAP sensor connector. Also, at the PCM connector, remove the MAP sensor signal wire and check for continuity to the MAP sensor connector. If there is infinite resistance, then repair open in MAP signal circuit. If the signal wire has continuity to the MAP sensor connector, then check for 5 volt reference voltage to the connector and a good ground. If both are present, then re-install all removed wiring and replace the MAP sensor.
Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at full 4.5 voltage? Then:
  1. Inspect the wiring harness for damage. Repair as needed
  2. Remove the MAP sensor signal wire from the PCM connector. With a voltmeter measure the voltage with KEY ON ENGINE OFF. Is there 4.5 Volts? If so, unplug the MAP sensor and recheck. If it is still present, then repair short between the signal wire and 5 volt reference wire.
  3. If unplugging the MAP sensor causes the voltage to disappear, check that the ground is intact. If it is, then replace the MAP sensor due to internal short.

Jun 17, 2011 | 1995 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

Engine Code P0108. The engine revs up high and back low about 10 times before idling normally when first turned on. then there is other idling issues when accelerating to hard or at a stop. Are there...


P0108 - MAP Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit High Input

The MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor measures engine manifold negative air pressure. It's usually a three wire sensor: a ground wire, a 5 volt reference wire from the PCM (Powertrain Control Module) to the MAP sensor, and a signal wire that informs the PCM of the MAP sensor voltage reading as it changes. The higher the engine vacuum, the lower the voltage reading. The voltage should range between about 1 volt (at idle) to about 5 volts (WOT wide open throttle).

If the PCM sees the voltage reading from the MAP sensor is greater than 5 Volts, or if the voltage reading is higher than what the PCM considers normal under certain circumstances, a P0108 DTC will set.


Symptoms of a P0108 DTC code may include:
* MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) will likely be on
* Engine may run poorly
* Engine may not run at all
* Fuel mileage may decrease
* Presence of black smoke at exhaust


Causes: Potential causes of a P0108 code:
* Bad MAP sensor
* Leak in vacuum supply line to MAP sensor
* Engine vacuum leak
* Short on signal wire to PCM
* Short on reference voltage wire from PCM
* Open in ground circuit to MAP
* Worn engine causing low vacuum


Possible Solutions
A good way to diagnose if the MAP sensor is to blame would be to compare the KOEO (key on engine off) MAP sensor reading on a scan tool with the Barometric pressure reading. They should be the same because they both measure atmospheric pressure.

If the MAP reading is greater than 0.5 volt off of the BARO reading, then replacing the MAP sensor would likely fix the problem. Otherwise, start the engine and observe the MAP reading at idle. It should normally be about 1.5 volts (varies according to altitude).

a. If it is, the problem is likely intermittent. Check all the vacuum hoses for damage and replace as necessary. You can also try wiggle testing the harness and connector to reproduce the problem.
b. If the scan tool MAP reading is more than 4.5 volts, check the actual engine vacuum reading with the engine running. If it is less than 15 or 16 in. Hg, then the PCM is probably not seeing enough vacuum (due to a worn engine, perhaps) for a given operating condition (which causes a higher than normal voltage signal to the PCM) and setting the code. Repair the engine vacuum problem and retest.
c. But, if the actual engine vacuum reading is 16 in. Hg or more, then unplug the MAP sensor. The scan tool MAP reading should indicate that there is no voltage present. Check that the ground from the PCM is intact and also that the MAP sensor connector and terminals are tight. If the connection is good, then replace the map sensor.
d. However if, with KOEO, & the MAP sensor unplugged, the scan tool shows a voltage reading, then there may be a short in the harness to the MAP sensor. Turn the ignition off. At the PCM unplug connector and remove the MAP signal wire from the connector. Re-attach the PCM connector and see if with KOEO, the scan tool MAP reading shows voltage. If it still does, replace the PCM. If not, check for voltage on the signal wire you just removed from the PCM. If there is voltage on the signal wire, find the short in the harness and repair.


Hope helps (remember to rate this answer).

Apr 05, 2011 | 2003 Chrysler PT Cruiser

1 Answer

Code po105 pops up i had it reset and every 3-4 days it lights back up what does it mean ?


Generic code results from http://www.obd-codes.com/p0105 :

P0105 - MAP Circuit Malfunction

Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit Malfunction

The MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor is part of the fuel management system. It reacts to changes in engine manifold pressure. The PCM (Powertrain Control Module) monitors the MAP sensor continually to properly run the engine. Changes in engine load require changes in the amount of fuel injected, and timing of the ignition system, etc. An engine under load has more manifold pressure(or less vacuum) than an engine that is coasting. As the load changes, the MAP sensor voltage signal to the PCM changes accordingly. To check the MAP sensor operation, though, the PCM watches other sensors to verify that the MAP sensor is working properly.

For example, the PCM compares the TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) signal to the MAP signal to verify the MAP signal isn't "sticking". If the PCM doesn't see a MAP sensor change immediately follow a change in the throttle pedal sensor, it knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor and sets P0105. Or, if the PCM notices that the TPS indicates the engine is under load, but the MAP signal indicates that the engine is "coasting" it, again, knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor or TPS and sets P0105.

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Symptoms of a P0105 check engine light code may include:

  • Poor running engine
  • Engine runs rich
  • Engine won't idle
  • Engine backfires through tailpipe
  • Engine misfire under load or at idle
  • MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
  • In some extreme cases there may be no symptoms other than MIL illumination

A P0105 DTC could be caused by:

  • MAP sensor vacuum hose disconnected or plugged
  • Bad MAP sensor
  • Bad TPS
  • Damaged or problematic MAP sensor connector
  • Damaged or problematic TPS connector
  • Damaged wiring
  • Short to reference voltage on signal circuit of MAP sensor
  • Loss of ground to MAP sensor or TPS
  • Open on signal circuit of MAP sensor
  • Bad PCM

Using a scanner or code reader, turn the ignition on and engine OFF; what does the MAP sensor voltage read? It should be about 4 Volts for sea level. If you are at a higher altitude, it should decrease about half a volt or so for each 1,000 ft. of altitude (this will vary from model to model) Or if you have a separate MAF (Mass air flow) sensor on your vehicle, they are usually equipped with a Barometric pressure reading. If so, the Baro reading should match the MAP reading (they both measure ambient air pressure). If they're roughly equal, then, check for Freeze Frame data of the MAP sensor (if available).

NOTE: Freeze Frame data is the PCM recording a fault when it happens. It captures the readings of the various PIDS (parameter identifiers)available to troubleshoot what happened. It's like a recording of the problem as it happened. At idle a typical MAP sensor Voltage reading should be about a volt, and at WOT (wide open throttle) it should approach 4.5 to 5 Volts. As for the TPS, at idle, the voltage reading is about 1 Volt or less. As the throttle is opened the reading will increase to 4.5 Volts at WOT. Do the two readings make sense? For example, if the TPS reading on Freeze Frame data shows 2.5 Volts (indicating partial throttle) does the MAP sensor indicate a reading that isn't at either extreme? Using the Freeze Frame data (if available) compare the MAP reading to the TPS when the problem occurred. This can help you identify what happened

If you have no access to Freeze Frame data then check if the MAP sensor voltage changes when you apply vacuum to it. You can do this by mouth or a vacuum pump. The voltage should increase as you apply vacuum. If the reading doesn't change as you apply vacuum, make sure there are no obstructions in the hose to the sensor. If the hose is clear, the MAP sensor is usually bad, but it doesn't rule out the following from causing the problem: Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at less than .5 Volts? Then:

NOTE: This code shouldn't set if the MAP is stuck at extremely low voltage, however, I'm adding it in because there's no way to know for certain for which vehicles a low voltage condition may set a P0105.

  1. Inspect the wiring harness and MAP sensor connector. Repair any damage
  2. Unplug the MAP sensor connector. Also, at the PCM connector, remove the MAP sensor signal wire and check for continuity to the MAP sensor connector. If there is infinite resistance, then repair open in MAP signal circuit. If the signal wire has continuity to the MAP sensor connector, then check for 5 volt reference voltage to the connector and a good ground. If both are present, then re-install all removed wiring and replace the MAP sensor.

Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at full 4.5 voltage? Then:

  1. Inspect the wiring harness for damage. Repair as needed
  2. Remove the MAP sensor signal wire from the PCM connector. With a voltmeter measure the voltage with KEY ON ENGINE OFF. Is there 4.5 Volts? If so, unplug the MAP sensor and recheck. If it is still present, then repair short between the signal wire and 5 volt reference wire.
  3. If unplugging the MAP sensor causes the voltage to disappear, check that the ground is intact. If it is, then replace the MAP sensor due to internal short.

Feb 27, 2011 | Jaguar X-Type Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have this eobd code problem p0105 in my elantra, where those sensors?


P0105 - Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit Malfunction
The MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor is part of the fuel management system. It reacts to changes in engine manifold pressure. The PCM (Powertrain Control Module) monitors the MAP sensor continually to properly run the engine. Changes in engine load require changes in the amount of fuel injected, and timing of the ignition system, etc. An engine under load has more manifold pressure(or less vacuum) than an engine that is coasting. As the load changes, the MAP sensor voltage signal to the PCM changes accordingly. To check the MAP sensor operation, though, the PCM watches other sensors to verify that the MAP sensor is working properly.

For example, the PCM compares the TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) signal to the MAP signal to verify the MAP signal isn't "sticking". If the PCM doesn't see a MAP sensor change immediately follow a change in the throttle pedal sensor, it knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor and sets P0105. Or, if the PCM notices that the TPS indicates the engine is under load, but the MAP signal indicates that the engine is "coasting" it, again, knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor or TPS and sets P0105.

Symptoms of a P0105 check engine light code may include:
* Poor running engine
* Engine runs rich
* Engine won't idle
* Engine backfires through tailpipe
* Engine misfire under load or at idle
* MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
* In some extreme cases there may be no symptoms other than MIL illumination

Causes: A P0105 DTC could be caused by:
* MAP sensor vacuum hose disconnected or plugged
* Bad MAP sensor
* Bad TPS
* Damaged or problematic MAP sensor connector
* Damaged or problematic TPS connector
* Damaged wiring
* Short to reference voltage on signal circuit of MAP sensor
* Loss of ground to MAP sensor or TPS
* Open on signal circuit of MAP sensor
* Bad PCM

Possible Solutions:
Using a scanner or code reader, turn the ignition on and engine OFF; what does the MAP sensor voltage read? It should be about 4 Volts for sea level. If you are at a higher altitude, it should decrease about half a volt or so for each 1,000 ft. of altitude (this will vary from model to model) Or if you have a separate MAF (Mass air flow) sensor on your vehicle, they are usually equipped with a Barometric pressure reading. If so, the Baro reading should match the MAP reading (they both measure ambient air pressure). If they're roughly equal, then, check for Freeze Frame data of the MAP sensor (if available).

NOTE: Freeze Frame data is the PCM recording a fault when it happens. It captures the readings of the various PIDS (parameter identifiers)available to troubleshoot what happened. It's like a recording of the problem as it happened. At idle a typical MAP sensor Voltage reading should be about a volt, and at WOT (wide open throttle) it should approach 4.5 to 5 Volts. As for the TPS, at idle, the voltage reading is about 1 Volt or less. As the throttle is opened the reading will increase to 4.5 Volts at WOT. Do the two readings make sense? For example, if the TPS reading on Freeze Frame data shows 2.5 Volts (indicating partial throttle) does the MAP sensor indicate a reading that isn't at either extreme? Using the Freeze Frame data (if available) compare the MAP reading to the TPS when the problem occurred. This can help you identify what happened

If you have no access to Freeze Frame data then check if the MAP sensor voltage changes when you apply vacuum to it. You can do this by mouth or a vacuum pump. The voltage should increase as you apply vacuum. If the reading doesn't change as you apply vacuum, make sure there are no obstructions in the hose to the sensor. If the hose is clear, the MAP sensor is usually bad, but it doesn't rule out the following from causing the problem: Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at less than .5 Volts? Then:

NOTE: This code shouldn't set if the MAP is stuck at extremely low voltage, however, I'm adding it in because there's no way to know for certain for which vehicles a low voltage condition may set a P0105.

1. Inspect the wiring harness and MAP sensor connector. Repair any damage
2. Unplug the MAP sensor connector. Also, at the PCM connector, remove the MAP sensor signal wire and check for continuity to the MAP sensor connector. If there is infinite resistance, then repair open in MAP signal circuit. If the signal wire has continuity to the MAP sensor connector, then check for 5 volt reference voltage to the connector and a good ground. If both are present, then re-install all removed wiring and replace the MAP sensor.

Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at full 4.5 voltage? Then:
1. Inspect the wiring harness for damage. Repair as needed
2. Remove the MAP sensor signal wire from the PCM connector. With a voltmeter measure the voltage with KEY ON ENGINE OFF. Is there 4.5 Volts? If so, unplug the MAP sensor and recheck. If it is still present, then repair short between the signal wire and 5 volt reference wire.
3. If unplugging the MAP sensor causes the voltage to disappear, check that the ground is intact. If it is, then replace the MAP sensor due to internal short.

MAP sensor codes include P0106, P0107, P0108 and P0109 .


LOCATIONS:
Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) Sensor: The MAP sensor is located against the firewall to the left side of the engine.
Barometric Pressure Sensor: This sensor is installed on the VAF sensor; Volume Air Flow Sensor Is located in the air intake plenum assembly.

Hope this helps.

Jan 24, 2011 | 2001 Hyundai Elantra

1 Answer

My 2004 forenza start good but when i step on gas it dont have power even shut off the intake manifold is dirty in the inside and the scanner give me code p0108 . PLEASE HELP!!!


P0108 Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit High Input

What does that mean? The MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor measures engine manifold negative air pressure. It's usually a three wire sensor: a ground wire, a 5 volt reference wire from the PCM (Powertrain Control Module) to the MAP sensor, and a signal wire that informs the PCM of the MAP sensor voltage reading as it changes. The higher the engine vacuum, the lower the voltage reading. The voltage should range between about 1 volt (at idle) to about 5 volts (WOT wide open throttle).
If the PCM sees the voltage reading from the MAP sensor is greater than 5 Volts, or if the voltage reading is higher than what the PCM considers normal under certain circumstances, a P0108 DTC will set.

Symptoms Symptoms of a P0108 DTC code may include:
  • MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) will likely be on
  • Engine may run poorly
  • Engine may not run at all
  • Fuel mileage may decrease
  • Presence of black smoke at exhaust
Causes Potential causes of a P0108 code:
  • Bad MAP sensor
  • Leak in vacuum supply line to MAP sensor
  • Engine vacuum leak
  • Short on signal wire to PCM
  • Short on reference voltage wire from PCM
  • Open in ground circuit to MAP
  • Worn engine causing low vacuum
Possible Solutions A good way to diagnose if the MAP sensor is to blame would be to compare the KOEO (key on engine off) MAP sensor reading on a scan tool with the Barometric pressure reading. They should be the same because they both measure atmospheric pressure.
If the MAP reading is greater than 0.5 volt off of the BARO reading, then replacing the MAP sensor would likely fix the problem. Otherwise, start the engine and observe the MAP reading at idle. It should normally be about 1.5 volts (varies according to altitude).
a. If it is, the problem is likely intermittent. Check all the vacuum hoses for damage and replace as necessary. You can also try wiggle testing the harness and connector to reproduce the problem.
b. If the scan tool MAP reading is more than 4.5 volts, check the actual engine vacuum reading with the engine running. If it is less than 15 or 16 in. Hg, then the PCM is probably not seeing enough vacuum (due to a worn engine, perhaps) for a given operating condition (which causes a higher than normal voltage signal to the PCM) and setting the code. Repair the engine vacuum problem and retest.
c. But, if the actual engine vacuum reading is 16 in. Hg or more, then unplug the MAP sensor. The scan tool MAP reading should indicate that there is no voltage present. Check that the ground from the PCM is intact and also that the MAP sensor connector and terminals are tight. If the connection is good, then replace the map sensor.
d. However if, with KOEO, & the MAP sensor unplugged, the scan tool shows a voltage reading, then there may be a short in the harness to the MAP sensor. Turn the ignition off. At the PCM unplug connector and remove the MAP signal wire from the connector. Re-attach the PCM connector and see if with KOEO, the scan tool MAP reading shows voltage. If it still does, replace the PCM. If not, check for voltage on the signal wire you just removed from the PCM. If there is voltage on the signal wire, find the short in the harness and repair.

Dec 22, 2010 | 2004 Suzuki Forenza

1 Answer

I have a p0105 error. They say this is a dirty body throttle. How can I clean this myself? My car is a 2002 Chevy Envoy.


DTC P0105 - Crankshaft Position Sensor B Circuit Malfunction or Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit Malfunction


What does that mean?
The MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor is part of the fuel management system. It reacts to changes in engine manifold pressure. The PCM (Powertrain Control Module) monitors the MAP sensor continually to properly run the engine. Changes in engine load require changes in the amount of fuel injected, and timing of the ignition system, etc. An engine under load has more manifold pressure(or less vacuum) than an engine that is coasting. As the load changes, the MAP sensor voltage signal to the PCM changes accordingly. To check the MAP sensor operation, though, the PCM watches other sensors to verify that the MAP sensor is working properly.

For example, the PCM compares the TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) signal to the MAP signal to verify the MAP signal isn't "sticking". If the PCM doesn't see a MAP sensor change immediately follow a change in the throttle pedal sensor, it knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor and sets P0105. Or, if the PCM notices that the TPS indicates the engine is under load, but the MAP signal indicates that the engine is "coasting" it, again, knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor or TPS and sets P0105.

Symptoms: Symptoms of a P0105 check engine light code may include:
* Poor running engine
* Engine runs rich
* Engine won't idle
* Engine backfires through tailpipe
* Engine misfire under load or at idle
* MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
* In some extreme cases there may be no symptoms other than MIL illumination

Causes: A P0105 DTC could be caused by:
* MAP sensor vacuum hose disconnected or plugged
* Bad MAP sensor
* Bad TPS
* Damaged or problematic MAP sensor connector
* Damaged or problematic TPS connector
* Damaged wiring
* Short to reference voltage on signal circuit of MAP sensor
* Loss of ground to MAP sensor or TPS
* Open on signal circuit of MAP sensor
* Bad PCM

Possible Solutions: Using a scanner or code reader, turn the ignition on and engine OFF; what does the MAP sensor voltage read? It should be about 4 Volts for sea level. If you are at a higher altitude, it should decrease about half a volt or so for each 1,000 ft. of altitude (this will vary from model to model) Or if you have a separate MAF (Mass air flow) sensor on your vehicle, they are usually equipped with a Barometric pressure reading. If so, the Baro reading should match the MAP reading (they both measure ambient air pressure). If they're roughly equal, then, check for Freeze Frame data of the MAP sensor (if available).

NOTE: Freeze Frame data is the PCM recording a fault when it happens. It captures the readings of the various PIDS (parameter identifiers)available to troubleshoot what happened. It's like a recording of the problem as it happened. At idle a typical MAP sensor Voltage reading should be about a volt, and at WOT (wide open throttle) it should approach 4.5 to 5 Volts. As for the TPS, at idle, the voltage reading is about 1 Volt or less. As the throttle is opened the reading will increase to 4.5 Volts at WOT. Do the two readings make sense? For example, if the TPS reading on Freeze Frame data shows 2.5 Volts (indicating partial throttle) does the MAP sensor indicate a reading that isn't at either extreme? Using the Freeze Frame data (if available) compare the MAP reading to the TPS when the problem occurred. This can help you identify what happened

If you have no access to Freeze Frame data then check if the MAP sensor voltage changes when you apply vacuum to it. You can do this by mouth or a vacuum pump. The voltage should increase as you apply vacuum. If the reading doesn't change as you apply vacuum, make sure there are no obstructions in the hose to the sensor. If the hose is clear, the MAP sensor is usually bad, but it doesn't rule out the following from causing the problem: Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at less than .5 Volts? Then:

NOTE: This code shouldn't set if the MAP is stuck at extremely low voltage, however, I'm adding it in because there's no way to know for certain for which vehicles a low voltage condition may set a P0105.

1. Inspect the wiring harness and MAP sensor connector. Repair any damage
2. Unplug the MAP sensor connector. Also, at the PCM connector, remove the MAP sensor signal wire and check for continuity to the MAP sensor connector. If there is infinite resistance, then repair open in MAP signal circuit. If the signal wire has continuity to the MAP sensor connector, then check for 5 volt reference voltage to the connector and a good ground. If both are present, then re-install all removed wiring and replace the MAP sensor.

Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at full 4.5 voltage? Then:

1. Inspect the wiring harness for damage. Repair as needed
2. Remove the MAP sensor signal wire from the PCM connector. With a voltmeter measure the voltage with KEY ON ENGINE OFF. Is there 4.5 Volts? If so, unplug the MAP sensor and recheck. If it is still present, then repair short between the signal wire and 5 volt reference wire.
3. If unplugging the MAP sensor causes the voltage to disappear, check that the ground is intact. If it is, then replace the MAP sensor due to internal short.

MAP sensor codes include P0105, P0106, P0107, P0108 and P0109 .


Hope helps (remember rated this).

Jul 09, 2010 | 2002 GMC Envoy

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