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I have a john deete 185 hydro the starter voltage drops when the switch is engaged to the start position, the voltage drops to 7.8 volts, and will not turn the motor. If I wire straight from the battery positive pole to the starter, it will start. The switch has been replaced, and the starter checked by a service facility. sometimes the mower will start with no problem.

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Hi..my name is Keith..and if you can use a jumper wire from the battery to the starter then the problem lies within the battery wires..i would suspect either corroded connections at the battery..so i would clean the terminals and i would also make sure the ground wire to the frame was clean..or the power wire has drawn too many amps at some point and it has become hard and brittle and it wont let current flow..i hope this has helped ..if not please write me back

Posted on Jun 30, 2009

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When I start her she starts but the electric starter wont shut off , even once id turned the scooter off it keeps turning over the electric starter, any ideas


Hi, Dominic in order to diagnose the starter circuit you must start with a fully charged battery, 12.5 volts or better and be able to pass a proper load test if necessary. The battery cables and terminals must be clean and tight. The "NEGATIVE" cable is famous for corroding and or breaking inside the harness, check the connectors at both ends. Check your starter relay with a test light for continuity, it could be faulty due to corrosion and sticking in a closed configuration, another claim to fame. Finally, there is the starter solenoid, low battery voltage or faulty battery connections will cause extremely high amperage at the plate and contact shoes and rob the hold in coils of much-needed voltage. In extreme cases, the solenoid plunger plate will literally weld itself to the contact shoes, keeping the circuit closed and thus permanent engagement. Another scenario is unacceptable voltage drop to the starter solenoid from the ignition switch to the starter relay to the starter button, and finally to the solenoid. Remove the green wire from the starter solenoid and hook up the positive lead of your voltmeter to the green wire connector and ground the negative lead. Turn on the ignition switch and depress starter button, the voltage reading should be no more than .5 volt less than the battery voltage. If it is more than .5 volt you need to backtrack that part of the circuit with your volt meter until you find the voltage robbing offender. Next, remove the 3 screws that secure the solenoid cover and remove the plunger, dress the plate and the contact shoes of arching residue and make sure the contact shoes are tight and secure. If you have done all of the above, replace the green starter button wire, hook up your voltmeter to the battery and check the voltage drop when you start the engine, anything below 9 volts could indicate a faulty battery and a proper load test should be performed. For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please visit the websites below. Good luck and have a nice day. My GL1500 starter stays engaged
78 SHOVEL STARTER STAYS ENGAGED Harley Davidson Forums
http://www.starbikeforums.com/forums/49-v-star/67825-starter-clutch-stays-engaged.html
Starter stays engaged Honda Tech

Mar 15, 2016 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

1974 XLH Sportster. Power from battery to bendix. Why nothing to starter or anything else?


Hi John, check # 6 first and it should be noted that in order to "PROPERLY" diagnosis any electric starter issue it is "IMPERATIVE" that you begin with a fully charged battery 12.5 volts or better and be able to pass a proper load test, and the usual suspects are:
1. Battery terminals have loose or corroded connections.
2. Battery cables faulty due corroded or broken internal wiring at the cable connector especially the "NEGATIVE" cable which needs to be checked at "BOTH" ends.
3. Battery voltage, 12.5 volts or better,to the main circuit breaker to the ignition switch to the security/ignition fuse to the TSM/TSSM module to the engine stop/run switch to the starter button to the starter relay to the green wire that connects to the starter solenoid has dropped more than 1/2 volt.
4. With a voltmeter connected to the battery, the ignition switch in the on position, the kill switch in the run position, the starter button depressed, starter engagement should not bring voltage below 8-9 volts.
If a lower voltage is produced a proper battery load test should be performed with a load tester to validate battery integrity or battery replacement.
5. Faulty starter relay, check continuity.
6. Faulty starter solenoid, check contact plate and shoes for excessive electrical erosion/etching, refurbish as necessary or invert contact plate and use the virgin backside. Check contact shoes for being loose. Replace solenoid if the negative function is still a final outcome.
7. Faulty starter, bench test starter with a 12-volt battery if negative function check, decontaminate and undercut armature commutator segments as necessary, check segments with an ohm-meter probe each one and the segment next to it for shorts. Have the armature tested with a growler and field coils, and brush plate with an ohm-meter for opens, shorts or grounds. Replace brushes if less than .438" It is generally cheaper to overhaul/refurbish a starter motor than buy a new one.
For more information about your issue, please visit the websites below, and for specific information or questions, please feel free to contact me at xlch@mail.com. Good luck and have a nice day.
Harley Davidson Wiring Diagrams and Schematics
Harley Davidson Manuals Mark Workshop Starter solenoid relay

Dec 05, 2015 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

HEAD LIGHT NOT COMING ON AFTER ENGINE IS STARTER. ORGINALLY HAD A STATOR GO OUT. REPLACED STATOR, REGULATOR, BATTERY, AND STARTER RELAY.


Hi, Anonymous in order to diagnose the starter circuit you must start with a fully charged battery, 12.5 volts or better and be able to pass a proper load test if necessary. The battery cables and terminals must be clean and tight. The "NEGATIVE" cable is famous for corroding and or breaking inside the harness, check the connectors at both ends. Check your starter relay with a test light for continuity, it could be faulty due to corrosion and sticking in a closed configuration, another claim to fame. Finally, there is the starter solenoid, low battery voltage or faulty battery connections will cause extremely high amperage at the plate and contact shoes and rob the hold in coils of much-needed voltage. In extreme cases, the solenoid plunger plate will literally weld itself to the contact shoes, keeping the circuit closed and thus permanent engagement. Another scenario is unacceptable voltage drop to the starter solenoid from the ignition switch to the starter relay to the starter button, and finally to the solenoid. Remove the green wire from the starter solenoid and hook up the positive lead of your volt meter to the green wire connector and ground the negative lead. Turn on the ignition switch and depress starter button, the voltage reading should be no more than .5 volt less than the battery voltage. If it is more than .5 volt you need to backtrack that part of the circuit with your volt meter until you find the voltage robbing offender. Next remove the 3 screws that secure the solenoid cover and remove the plunger, dress the plate and the contact shoes of arching residue and make sure the contact shoes are tight and secure. If you have done all of the above, replace the green starter button wire, hook up your voltmeter to the battery and check the voltage drop when you start the engine, anything below 9 volts could indicate a faulty battery and a proper load test should be performed. Good luck and have a nice day.

Aug 22, 2015 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

2008 flhx starter will not ingage


Does the start relay click, if not the problem is somewhere before the relay, in the fuse block, start/run switch or the starter switch. If it clicks all is okay up to that point and so the problem is somewhere between the relay and the solenoid if the solenoid then does not also click, or in the solenoid itself. If the solenoid rattles you likely have a discharged, weak or no god battery or corroded battery posts and terminals or solenoid stud. If the solenoid gives a click but the starter drive does not engage the drive may be defective and if the motor spins but does not engage you have a starer drive problem. If the starter engages but does not turn the engine over you may also have a weak battery, poor connection or poor ground or mechanical problems. DO a voltage drop test if you can.

First do a voltage reading on the battery and note what it is.

Using a voltmeter attach the red meter lead to the most positive part of the circuit, which would be the positive post of the battery and attach the black meter lead to the final destination or component in the circuit (if testing a starter circuit this would be the terminal on the starter, not the solenoid). THEN try to activate the starter and observe the meter reading. The meter will read the voltage dropped or the difference in potential between the source and the destination. An ideal circuit voltage drop reading would be 1 volt or less. If there is an open in the circuit (i.e. NO electricity is reaching the terminal) the voltmeter should read source voltage volts which means all the voltage was dropped. A normal good starter circuit should not show more than a one volt drop. If more than 1 volt is dropped there is a problem somewhere in the circuitry before the starter terminal. In this case leaving the red voltmeter lead on the battery positive post, move the negative voltmeter lead to the solenoid stud where the battery cable attaches and activate the starter circuit again. If the voltage reading is now 1 volt or less clean, repair, tighten the starter solenoid to starter terminal stud connections and test again and if no change clean/repair the internal solenoid contacts or replace the solenoid with a new/good one. If there is still a voltage drop greater than 1 volt move the negative voltmeter lead from the solenoid terminal stud to the actual battery cable terminal end at the solenoid terminal stud and again activate the starter circuit. If there is a 1 volt or less reading the battery cable terminal end and/or solenoid terminal stud and/or the connection between the two is faulty, loose, corroded or etc. Clean and tighten and retest. If there is still more than a 1 volt reading on the voltmeter the problem is a loose or corroded or otherwise bad connection between the battery cable terminal end and the battery positive post or the battery cable itself is bad. Clean and tighten the battery cable terminal and battery positive post and test again. If there is still more than a one volt reading on the voltmeter the battery cable is bad and will need to be replaced.

If there is less than a 1 volt reading when the test is done at the starter terminal the circuit up to that point is good so the next step will be to do a negative or ground circuit voltage drop test by connecting the negative or black voltmeter lead to the most negative point which is normally the negative battery post (or the closest thing thereto if, like some Sportsters, the battery post is hard or impossible to get to) and then connect the positive or red voltmeter lead to the starter mounting studs. Then activate the starter circuit again and if the voltage reading is greater than 1 volt clean the battery negative cable ends and battery post and negative cable to motorcycle frame or other grounding point, tighten same and similarly the starter mounting points and studs because there is a problem with the starter ground (could be looseness, corrosion, powder coat/paint problems etc). If the voltage reading is 1 volt or less than 1 volt in this test the ground circuit is okay and it will be necessary to perform a starter current draw test on the vehicle (and/or a starter current free draw test on the bench). If the results are within the specifications for the starter in these tests remove the spark plugs, raise the rear wheel so it can spin unimpeded, put the transmission in 5th gear and rotate the rear wheel to check for engine, transmission, primary and/or crankshaft resistance/bind. If the results are not within the amperage specifications for the particular starter replace or repair the starter motor to bring within the system amperage specifications.

Jun 07, 2014 | 2008 Harley Davidson FLHX Street Glide

1 Answer

2011 cpi jv50


Hi, Anonymous it should be noted that in order to "PROPERLY" diagnosis any electric starter issue it is "IMPERATIVE" that you begin with a fully charged battery 12.5 volts or better and be able to pass a proper load test, and the usual suspects are:
1. Battery terminals have loose or corroded connections.
2. Battery cables faulty due corroded or broken internal wiring at the cable connector especially the "NEGATIVE" cable which needs to be checked at "BOTH" ends.
3. Battery voltage, 12.5 volts or better,to the main circuit breaker to the ignition switch to the security/ignition fuse to the TSM/TSSM module to the engine stop/run switch to the starter button to the starter relay to the green wire that connects to the starter solenoid has dropped more than 1/2 volt.
4. With a voltmeter connected to the battery, the ignition switch in the on position, the kill switch in the run position, the starter button depressed, starter engagement should not bring voltage below 8-9 volts.
If a lower voltage is produced a proper battery load test should be performed with a load tester to validate battery integrity or battery replacement.
5. Faulty starter relay, check continuity.
6. Faulty starter solenoid, check contact plate and shoes for excessive electrical erosion/etching, refurbish as necessary or invert contact plate and use the virgin backside. Check contact shoes for being loose. Replace solenoid if the negative function is still a final outcome.
7. Faulty starter, bench test starter with a 12-volt battery if negative function check, decontaminate and undercut armature commutator segments as necessary, check segments with an ohm-meter probe each one and the segment next to it for shorts. Have the armature tested with a growler and field coils, and brush plate with an ohm-meter for opens, shorts or grounds. Replace brushes if less than .438" It is generally cheaper to overhaul/refurbish a starter motor than buy a new one.
For more information about your issue and free downloads that you will need please visit the websites below. Good luck and have a nice day.
http://www.scootermasters.com/manuals/CPI%20Cheetah%20XS%20Service%20Manual%202t.pdf
Starter clicking but not turning over
2005 CPI motorcycles Specifications moto123 com
Tips and Tricks for Motorcyclists

Jun 24, 2013 | Cpi Motorcycles

1 Answer

Starter doesn't engage


Year make and model ?
Normally you have power to the large post from the battery, and then power on the small wire from the key switch when it is in the start position. The small wire energizes the solenoid and as the starter spins the bendix gear extends out.

May 18, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Starter problems for 88 ford aerostar van 7 passenger. how do i know its the starter or bad connection?


Test your battery and starter by doing a voltage drop test. Put one test lead of your meter on the neg side of your battery, one on the positive. Check voltage. Make sure that you are actually connecting to the battery itself and not the terminal ends. Should read 12.8-13.2. Keeping the neg in the same location move the pos to the terminal end, engage starter, meter should read above 10 volts. Continue testing down the pos wire to the starter, checking voltage, until you find less than 10 volts. If the voltage is good at starter, have someone turn key to the start position, tap starter with a hammer. if starter engages , replace starter.

Aug 19, 2011 | 1988 Ford Aerostar

3 Answers

John Deere hydro 185 When I try to start


You have a bad disk in the starter solenoid pull the starter and go to a shop and buy a new solenoid or flip the disk in the solenoid and sand the two contacts so that it will make contact.

Jun 12, 2009 | Garden

2 Answers

1987 john deere 750 compact tractor 4 wheel drive, wont start


percussive maintenance my friend. Try banging on the solenoid and starter with a hammer while in the start position. Also, if you have a voltmeter, you can see where voltage is getting to and that will help you as well.

Jun 09, 2009 | Diesel Garden

2 Answers

1988 jeep comanche will start only when you hold tumbler in the start position, when you relese it, engine stops.. engine is a 4.0 auto, fuel injected 4x4


If the car has a resistor coil with a ballast resistor to drop voltage from 12 to 8 then check the resistor wiring. When you engage the starter tumbler it by passes the ballast resistor and sends 12 volts straight to the eight volt coil to get good spark. When you release it the 12 volts goes through the resistor to 8 volts and then the coil. If there is a fault in this circuit the engine stops. Jump the 12 volts straight to the coil and start it. If it keeps going the ballast circuit is faulty. Paul

Jul 27, 2008 | 1986 Jeep Comanche

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