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Motor hums , fan blades won't turn

Starts with a squealing sound and the fan blades turnnig slowly at first then getting up to speed. No the motor hums and blades won't turn at all

Posted by Anonymous on

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

night71
  • 328 Answers

SOURCE: Hampton Bay 36" Fan Hums but won't turn

The motor has gotten tired now after being on 24/7. With the blades off, it would turn easily but the weight of the blades strain the motor. You could check that there is proper 110 volt current to the motor because anything less will cause that problem too. You can also help the fan start by spinning the blades while it is on. Short of these suggestions, it is time for a new fan.

Posted on Nov 18, 2007

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Motor seized

I just want to know if I can purchase a NEW motor and what the cost is?

Posted on Feb 25, 2008

ccanni1028
  • 10 Answers

SOURCE: ceiling fan power

It sounds like the fan motor has blown out. Is this an old fan? The motors do burn out every 5-10 years, depending on the brand and quality of motor.

Posted on May 01, 2008

  • 68 Answers

SOURCE: ceiling fan turns slowly

If you've had it for a few years, the bearings are probably getting bad (dry).
Always start a fan on high---then go to the speed you want, only the high speed windings will handle start-up.

Posted on Apr 28, 2009

dnewcombe1
  • 1564 Answers

SOURCE: Humming noise from motor of oscillating fan.

Wd-40 is not a very good lubricant. It only lasts fror a few days and then dries up again. In order to get your fan working again, take some 3-in one oil and put a drop at the bearing side of each bearing top and bottom with the shaft upright. Spuin and tap the motor briskly with a small tack hammer or screw driver handle. This will impact and allow the oil to get into the bearings Keep tapping and turning until you feel it lighten up a spin freely. Turn it over and do the same thing again. I garuntee that all will be fine after this.

Posted on Sep 07, 2009

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3 Answers

Why don't fan blades rotate?


Sadly Hunter doesn't want people dismantling their stuff and replacing broken or burnt out pieces. They'd rather you buy a new one. If the motor has burned out which is possible a solution depending on how handy you are is simply hunt down a similar replacement and reconnect it.

Make sure the new motor has the exact same leads and connectors as the old one had as some Hunter fans have more than two leads. The model I have has four leads: a black, a white, a green and a red as my model has integrated lighting controls by passed by the motor.

I bought a simple blower motor with the same rating only two wires and with a bit of solder and wire I hooked up the motor and lights separately. The new motor is much faster than the older one so I had to add a tiny 1-way 500 watt dimmer switch to manually turn down the speed.

Aug 30, 2015 | Hunter Dryers

1 Answer

I installed a new Broan QML30SS range hood and fan makes loud humming sound as it runs


An old elecricians joke says "do you know why it hums? It dosn't know the words" Al kidding aside ,have you checked to see how free the fan blade is? The should spin very freely. It kind of sounds to me like it may be having a hard time comming up to full speed. You may try some graphite lube on the motor. If I recall Broan has a lifetime garrentee on the motor. You might just want to repace it if I am correct.

Mar 02, 2013 | Broan QML30SS Pro-Style Under-Cabinet...

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Hello, I replaced a light fixture on my existing Emerson ceiling fan. The light worked right away but the blades didn't turn. I could hear power going to the motor so I went back into the switch cup and...


Signs of a bad capacitor in a ceiling fan include:

  • Fan runs slowly or not at all on all speeds
  • Fan will not start but will spin if started by hand
  • Certain speeds are slow or do not work
  • The motor hums and turns freely by hand but will not spin

    The capacitor is usually a black box inside the switch housing of the fan. If this box appears burnt or melted in any way, that is also the sign of a bad capacitor and it should be replaced.

    have a good day !!
  • Feb 17, 2011 | Emerson Fans CF705AW 52" Northwind Ceiling

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    Fan blade does not immediately spin when turned on; loud


    The motor bearings need machine (like sewing machine oil).
    Try a quick spray of WD40 or Liquid Wrench, but use machine oil, soon.
    Look for an "oil hole" on top of the motor; there may be two of them.

    Oct 05, 2009 | Lasko 2506 16", 3 Speed, Oscillating Fan

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    Motor can be heard going but the blade wont spin!!


    There is usually a pin in the shaft of the motor, that corrosponds with a slot in the fan blades, it sounds to me like either (a) the pin somehow came out, or (b) the slot in the blades is rounded. Hope this helps

    Jul 15, 2009 | Patton 20" CVT Performance Air Circulator,...

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    Noisy


    Hello janeknows. The shaft of the fan motor may have a bearing gone bad. Follow these steps to locate problem. #1-turn power off by tripping the breaker, place your fingers on the shaft surrorting the blades & SLOWLY rotate the blades feeling for a catch or bump. A bump felt I suggest replacing the motor. No bump #2- remove the screws holding the cover supporting the control switches. Located among the wiring is a box with 2 or three wires. This is a capacitor. Note the info on the capacitor (1.4mf125v). Contact the fans Mgfr they may send you one for free if not visit your local hardware store and ask. Replace the unit using the wire caps in the unit or snip & strip the wire using new wire caps. Note witch wire went where. Turn power on and test operation.

    Oct 13, 2008 | Hampton Bay 54 In. 5-Blade Fan, Chestnut,...

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    Hampton bay fan noise


    The fan does not need to be oiled. The bearings are what manufacturers described as "permanently-sealed", which means that they're designed such that they don't require oiling. The manufacturers recommend against oiling, and if you really wanted to do it, you'd have to be an expert, because there is some very complex disassembly to be done, which requires specialized tools.

    HOWEVER...

    The problem is not related to oil. A lack of oil does not produce a hum. If a fan's bearings are low on oil, the sound generated is a scraping or brushing sound. A hum, on the other hand, is an electrical sound. All fan motors hum to some degree -- the cheap made-in-China ones, like in your Hampton Bay fan, hum more than others. There are some steps you can take to reduce the hum:

    * If you are using the fan with a solid-state control (i.e. a dimmer), that will cause the fan to hum. These controls are dangerous when used with fans, and a fire can result. You should have a qualified person remove the switch immediately and replace it with either a regular on/off switch OR a discrete-speed (i.e. 3-speed or 4-speed, rather than variable-dimmer) switch. Specially-designed ceiling fan switches such as this are available at your local Home Depot or Lowes. You could also use a remote-control system.

    * If you have a remote control or other speed control system, make sure that the pull-chain speed control on the fan is set to the "high" position (highest speed possible) and left there.

    * Make sure that all the screws are tight -- this includes screws which hold up the fan's mounting bracket, hold the blades onto the fan, and hold any applicable glass onto the light kit.

    * Even if you don't have a speed control, the motor will still produce an electrical hum -- and the blades, which are physically attached to the motor, serve as mechanical amplifiers -- they take the tiny electrical hum and amplify it just like the big brass funnel speaker on an antique gramophone (record player) takes the tiny vibrations of the needle on the record and amplifies them to a comfortably audible level. High-end fans have a rubber flywheel attached to the motor between the blade holders and the motor unit -- and since rubber doesn't transmit vibrations well, this effectively deadens the sound. Your fan doesn't have one of these, but you can effectively replicate the noise-dampening effect by putting rubber washers between where the blade holders touch the bottom of the motor AND between where the screws which hold the blade holders onto the motor, meet the blade holders themselves. This will completely remove the path along which the sound vibrations can flow to the blades, and thus your hum will stop.

    I hope this helps you! If you have any other questions, or need clarification, please ask!

    Jun 14, 2008 | Hampton Bay 24002 Ceiling Fan

    1 Answer

    Fan Stops blowing air


    Isthis a window unit? It sounds like it. There could be a problem with your fan switch or the fan motor itself? Multi-speed motors can lose one speed at a time. It really sounds like the fan motor is bad. If the compressor starts in the cool mode, and the fan doesn't, the fan motor could be locked up. See, if you can spin the motor by hand? If you can, then something is bad within the motor. Now, if the motor has a capacitor, check for a loose or burned wire. Good luck.

    May 18, 2008 | Maytag Heating & Cooling

    1 Answer

    Celing fan making noise, how to oil


    The fan does not need to be oiled. The bearings are what manufacturers described as "permanently-sealed", which means that they're designed such that they don't require oiling. The manufacturers recommend against oiling, and if you really wanted to do it, you'd have to be an expert, because there is some very complex disassembly to be done, which requires specialized tools.

    HOWEVER...

    The problem is not related to oil. A lack of oil does not produce a hum. If a fan's bearings are low on oil, the sound generated is a scraping or brushing sound. A hum, on the other hand, is an electrical sound. All fan motors hum to some degree -- the cheap made-in-China ones, like in your Hampton Bay fan, hum more than others. There are some steps you can take to reduce the hum:

    * If you are using the fan with a solid-state control (i.e. a dimmer), that will cause the fan to hum. These controls are dangerous when used with fans, and a fire can result. You should have a qualified person remove the switch immediately and replace it with either a regular on/off switch OR a discrete-speed (i.e. 3-speed or 4-speed, rather than variable-dimmer) switch. Specially-designed ceiling fan switches such as this are available at your local Home Depot or Lowes. You could also use a remote-control system.

    * If you have a remote control or other speed control system, make sure that the pull-chain speed control on the fan is set to the "high" position (highest speed possible) and left there.

    * Make sure that all the screws are tight -- this includes screws which hold up the fan's mounting bracket, hold the blades onto the fan, and hold any applicable glass onto the light kit.

    * Even if you don't have a speed control, the motor will still produce an electrical hum -- and the blades, which are physically attached to the motor, serve as mechanical amplifiers -- they take the tiny electrical hum and amplify it just like the big brass funnel speaker on an antique gramophone (record player) takes the tiny vibrations of the needle on the record and amplifies them to a comfortably audible level. High-end fans have a rubber flywheel attached to the motor between the blade holders and the motor unit -- and since rubber doesn't transmit vibrations well, this effectively deadens the sound. Your fan doesn't have one of these, but you can effectively replicate the noise-dampening effect by putting rubber washers between where the blade holders touch the bottom of the motor AND between where the screws which hold the blade holders onto the motor, meet the blade holders themselves. This will completely remove the path along which the sound vibrations can flow to the blades, and thus your hum will stop.

    I hope this helps you! If you have any other questions, or need clarification, please ask!

    Apr 30, 2008 | Hampton Bay 24002 Ceiling Fan

    3 Answers

    Ceiling fan power


    It sounds like the fan motor has blown out. Is this an old fan? The motors do burn out every 5-10 years, depending on the brand and quality of motor.

    Apr 14, 2008 | Hampton Bay 73554 Antigua Ceiling Fan

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