Question about Canon PowerShot SD1200 IS / Digital IXUS 95 IS Digital Camera

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Shoot pictures of the moon best setting for that

Help with settings for night shot of the moon

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Hi. I would recommend first you use a tripod or some stable support, second the best settings would be Aperture priority and use something in the region of f56-f8 or Manual and set f5.6-f8 and use the exposure indicator to adjust the shutter speed, use the spot meter function on the camera if you have it and vary the exposure by shooting at the recommended exposure and also by shooting overexposed and underexposed. Trial and error is really the only way to go.Set the ISO to 100 or 200 to get the best resolution as you will probably have to zoom it up to 200% on your computer screen to have a good image.

Posted on Apr 22, 2014

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

t00nz
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SOURCE: red tint in the picture

Not sure about the hot battery, but
the red tint may also be caused by a defective CCD imager. If so, Canon should fix this for you for free, including free shipping both ways. This is regardless of your camera's warranty status. Please check the following two links for more info:
http://camerarepair.blogspot.com/2007/11/canon-digital-cameras-showing-black.html
http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/controller?act=PgComSmModDisplayAct&fcategoryid=225&modelid=13390&keycode=2112&id=29819
Applicable cameras include:
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Posted on Nov 16, 2007

old marine
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SOURCE: I have a power Shot

See this link. Instructions for contacting Canon are for US residents. If not in the US, contact your regional Canon service facility. This service notice is effective worldwide.

Posted on Oct 06, 2008

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SOURCE: INDOORS PICTURES - NIGHT PICTURES

The best basic setting is FULL AUTOMATIC. Otherwise, there are too many variables to give you an accurate answer.

Posted on Feb 20, 2009

  • 130 Answers

SOURCE: Have a EOS 450D When I take a picture it says busy for a good 1

Switch to Shutter Prioriy (S) and set the shutter speed to what you want it should be at least 1/60th of a second.

Posted on Jun 12, 2009

Tri3mast
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SOURCE: Evening My Canon 400D Eos SLR will not take photos

Okay lets put some "joy" back into your photo's The reason you aren't getting anything is because your shutter speed is to fast. Your setting I think you are trying to say are F5.6 100 ISO and 1/100 shutter speed "M" manual setting. Actually if you looked closely on your "nothing there" there would be something. Anyway, Moon shots as simple as they look are anything but simple. The earth is moving and you are trying to take a still shot. I don't know where you are on this earth and every star system is different. Starting with a good solid tripod, next the lens needs to have a great enough focal length so the moon covers 2/3rds of the view (first shot) ISO 100 is good. In manual mode look at your light meter try to have your F-stop at F8 or F11 and adjust the shutter speed for proper exposure, you may need to adjust your aperture up or down once you have a "normal" exposure either increase your shutter speed or preferably stop down the lens two stops.
Your camera will meter down to 30 seconds if it goes below this then this is where you take your start (first shot) meter reading and count how many stops of light you require beyond 30 seconds.
For practice though attempt to stay within the 30 seconds by increasing the aperture but not wide open say F8 is as low as you go, need some speed adjust the ISO up to ISO 200 then ISO 400 don't go beyond this because other factors come into play at this point. the thing is you need to establish a metering point then stop down two stops and see what you have as far as exposure.

I know this may all sound really complicated but it's not the most important thing is to have a good tripod use F8 as your widest aperture don't increase beyond ISO 400 and keep your shutter speed at 30 second or above. Another problem that will occur is focus actually the lack of, your camera requires contrast to focus one you have established this shift the lens into manual and recompose your scene. What we aren't done yet don't touch the camera when your release the shutter. Use the 2 second time delay to give the camera time to stop vibrating after the shutter has bee depressed remove your hand DON'T touch it until the picture is finished. If it were me I'd be looking at doing a few landscapes at night to get use to all this stuff then tackle the moon so to speak. In the mean time here is a picture of The Fork Of the Thames in London Ontario Canada.
Picture here
tri3mast_162.jpg

Posted on Jan 14, 2011

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How to shoot pictures of the moon


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Nov 15, 2016 | Cameras

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How do I set the settings to take a night moon shot?


Assuming you mean pictures of the moon itself and not a night shot with the moon in it, set your camera to the manual exposure mode and ignore the light meter.

There's an old rule-of-thumb called the "Sunny Sixteen Rule." This states that the proper exposure under a midday sun is an aperture of f/16 and a shutter speed of 1 over the ISO. For example with an ISO 200 film or a digital sensor set at ISO 200 the proper exposure is f/16 and 1/200 second.

What does this have to do with night shots of the moon? Well, the moon is simply a large piece of rock under a cloudless midday sun. Thus the Sunny Sixteen Rule gives you a starting point for the exposure. You can then refine it by reviewing the picture on the LCD and looking at the histogram. The sky will go completely black and you won't see any stars, but you should be able to see at least some of the features of the lunar landscape.

Aug 31, 2012 | FujiFilm FinePix S2940 18X Ultra Zoom 14MP...

1 Answer

I try to take a picture and it comes out red. Why?


If a Camera is taking pictures in reddish color, most probability the night shot feature is enabled.
The Night shot also known as Dark Shot, Moon light mode in several models.
If you confirm that the Camera is not set to night shot mode, please reset the Camera by checking the manual of the Camera and check the operation. If the issue persists, service may be required. Please let me know the model # and make of the Camera so that I can provide specific instructions to reset the Camera.

If you wish to get the unit repaired, you can click hear to locate your nearest service facility.

Thanks for understanding.

Jun 16, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

What setting is used to shoot the moon on a dark clear night.


You'll have to experiment but start with 1/30 sec. at the widest aperture of your lens. Don't rely on the meter...it will only measure the black of the sky and overexpose the shot.

Nov 11, 2009 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera

1 Answer

So much light on picture


Hi, Mark here see if I can help.

Sound like your camera is set to night photography.
Try resetting it to Auto or sports when shooting in daylight.

Hope this fixed ya! need more help comment back.
Please rate. Good Luck!

Mar 28, 2009 | Canon PowerShot A450 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Fuji s700 taking good moon shots


shutter speed 50 to 80 ISO at 64 get your apature as small as it will go lagest f number set your focus to single point and single focus if you feel comfortable useing manual focus it is better but my manual focus stopped working here is the link to one of my moon shots on flickr

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2516/3966267384_90afc0b269.jpg

Jun 23, 2008 | Fuji FinePix S700 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Night shots


Hi: Well, I think you have a problem because you cannot take still shots at night :) Not even with the best SLR. The camera as to get light to make the picture. My advices are, not only use the tripod but when you shoot, but set the timer function so you don't touch the camera when it shoot's and use a high time of exposure like 2 or 5 seconds depending on the subject... Make several experiences with low resolution and when you suceed, make it with a higher resolution ;) Regards

Sep 04, 2005 | Fuji FinePix S5500 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Shooting modes


The Shooting modes are as follows: Program Auto (Factory default setting) Used for regular photography. The camera automatically makes the settings for natural color balance. Other functions, such as the flash mode and metering, can be adjusted manually. Portrait Suitable for taking a portrait-style shot of a person. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Landscape Suitable for taking photos of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Night scene Suitable for shooting pictures in the evening or at night. The camera sets a slower shutter speed than is used in normal shooting. If you take a picture of a street at night in any other mode, the lack of brightness will result in a dark picture with only dots of light showing. In this mode, the true appearance of the street is captured. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. If you use the flash, you can take pictures of both the subject and the background. Self Portrait Enables you to take a picture of yourself while holding the camera. Point the lens towards yourself and the focus will be locked on you. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. The zoom is fixed in the Wide position and cannot be changed.

Sep 01, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-450 Zoom Digital Camera

1 Answer

Shooting modes


What is the best situation to use each of the shooting modes? The shooting modes are described as follows: Program Auto (Factory default setting) Program Auto mode is used for regular photography. The camera automatically makes the settings for natural color balance. Other functions, such as the flash mode and metering, can be adjusted manually. Portrait Portrait mode is suitable for taking a portrait-style picture of a person. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Landscape + Portrait Landscape + Portrait mode is suitable for taking photos which include both your subject and the landscape. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Landscape Landscape mode is suitable for taking pictures of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Night scene Night scene mode is suitable for shooting pictures in the evening or at night. The camera sets a slower shutter speed than is used in normal shooting. If you take a picture of a street at night in any other mode, the lack of brightness will result in a dark picture with only dots of light showing. In this mode, the true appearance of the street is captured. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. If you use the flash, you can take pictures of both your subject and the night background. Self-portrait Self-portrait mode enables you to take a picture of yourself while holding the camera. Point the lens towards yourself, and the focus will be locked on you. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. The zoom is fixed in the wide position and cannot be changed. QuickTime Movie QuickTime Movie mode lets you record movies with sound. The focus and zoom are locked. If the distance to the subject changes, the focus may be compromised.

Sep 01, 2005 | Olympia OL-5805 Cordless Phone

1 Answer

Shooting modes


The Shooting modes are as follows: PROGRAM AUTO (Factory default setting) Used for regular photography. The camera automatically makes the settings for natural color balance. Other functions, such as the flash mode and metering, can be adjusted manually. Portrait Suitable for taking a portrait-style shot of a person. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Landscape Suitable for taking photos of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Night scene Suitable for shooting pictures in the evening or at night. The camera sets a slower shutter speed than is used in normal shooting. If you take a picture of a street at night in any other mode, the lack of brightness will result in a dark picture with only dots of light showing. In this mode, the true appearance of the street is captured. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. If you use the flash, you can take pictures of both the subject and the background. Self Portrait Enables you to take a picture of yourself while holding the camera. Point the lens towards yourself and the focus will be locked on you. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. The zoom is fixed in the Wide position and cannot be changed

Aug 31, 2005 | Olympus D-535 Zoom / C370 Zoom Digital...

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