Question about Cycling

1 Answer

Does eney one no how to sort out the gears on a mountin bike its the bit at front near pedal wont move

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    Corporal:

    An expert that hasĀ over 10 points.

    Problem Solver:

    An expert who has answered 5 questions.

  • Contributor
  • 19 Answers

Try roadbiker.com, they have excellent guides online

Posted on Jun 15, 2014

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of.(from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones)
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

Pedaling bike but wont move


Perhaps there is a gear with stripped thread where it attaches to the sprocket or the sprocket itself with stripped thread? In any of these cases, the whole sprocket should be replaced and in the second case the sprocket and hub. This accounts only for 6 or 7 gear sprockets.

Apr 19, 2014 | Huffy Cycling

1 Answer

Why wont my casio tv 600 pick up eney channels


I HAVE THE SAME PROBLEM BUT LAST NIGHT I PLACED THE TV NEAR THE FREEVIEW BOX AND THE TV JUST PICKED UP THE SIGNAL.A DIGITAL CHANNEL AT THAT ASWELL.NEAR PERFECT IMAGE.I DONT KNOW HOW THIS COULD BE ADAPTED TO USE THE PORTABLE AWAY FROM OFF THE FREEVIEW BOX.ANY SUGGESTIONS?

Aug 18, 2012 | Casio Portable Hand Held Tv - Model...

1 Answer

I have a Trek Lime bike with automatic shifter and it doesn't shift up quickly enough especially when riding slowly.


The automatic shifter mechanism on these bikes is driven by centrifugal force of weights near the rear axle. As they spin, they expand and move you to a higher gear. Although it's not a precise relationship, the mechanism is designed to shift to a gear that will give you a pretty constant pedal rpm - probably around 50 rpm. - regardless of the speed that the bike is moving. This is because as you ride longer distances your legs are most efficient at pedaling at a fairly constant speed (bikers call this cadence). Bikers who ride a lot find that these automatic shifters tend to keep you pedaling too slow (they find 70 rpm or even higher to be a better cadence.) However, if the cadence is too fast for you, you could alter the shift pattern by adding a bit more weight to the weights that are already there. You could do this with fishing weights and wire ties. This would give you a slower cadence. But as you ride the bike more you will probably find that you will want to remove the extra weights. I suggest that you keep riding without adding the weights and you will find that the preset cadence becomes more comfortable with time. It is also easier on your knees to have a faster cadence with lower pedal pressure. Good luck, Al K

Jun 20, 2011 | Cycling

2 Answers

My bike does not seem to shift gears should I be cruising as I shift or should I be pedaling


Your bike must not be the Cruiser pictured - that's a one-speed bike. So here's a general description--- For gear changes on multi-speed bikes, where the chain has to move between different size sprockets, the chain must be moving in order to shift. So, yes, you have to be pedaling, but it works best if you pedal very lightly - so that the chain is moving, but is under very light pressure. On the other hand, if you have a 3-speed bike where the gear changes take place inside the hub of the rear wheel, the wheel should be moving, but the chain should not - so you should be coasting to change gears.

Jun 23, 2010 | John Deere Nirve Model Cruiser Bike

1 Answer

Pedals move freely


If the pedal is moving too free,but the bike are still moiving forward, it simply mean you are using to low a gear .

Try changing to a high enough gear to satisfy your required tension. Be advised that,
You will also increase your speed,and decrease your hill climbing in the process though.

Jan 30, 2010 | Mountain Pedal Alloy Universal, ...

1 Answer

My shimno sora front derailler shifts perfectly to the small and large chain set cogs, but on the middle, the chain rubs along the cage.


Set the rear derailleur to the lowest gear (big cog) and the front to the lowest gear (small chain ring). Disconnect the derailleur cable. Screw in the adjuster for the cable tension all the way (this adjuster is on the shifter of a mountain bike or the down tube of a road bike). Pedal to make sure the chain is not rubbing on the derailleur cage. If it is, adjust the "L" setting on the derailleur until the chain moves by without touching the cage. Now pull taut and reattch the cable and shift the front to the big ring while pedaling. If it does not shift up well or completely, hold the shifter past its normal shift and adjust the "H" screw so that the derailleur allows the shift. Shift into the highest cassette gear and keep pedaling. The chain should not be touching the front derailleur's cage when you pedal. Adjust with the barrel adjuster until the chain moves freely without touching the derailleur cage.

i hope this helps
-matthew

Oct 30, 2009 | Cycling

1 Answer

Problem with chain and gears


Wash, degrease and scrub the chain and derailleurs with a good degreaser (like Simple Green). Dry the chain and relubricate it with an appropriate bike chain lubricant (not oil or WD-40). Shift the derailleurs to the smallest chain ring and cog on the cassette (low front gear, high rear gear) and then loosen the cable at the derailleurs, pull the cables taut and reattach them. If the derailleurs still need adjustment, here is a procedure for it:
Flip the bike over (so you can pedal the bike manually while you shift) and shift the front to the middle chain ring. Shift the rear to the highest gear (small cog). Release the cable from the pinch bolt on the derailleur. Adjust the screw marked "H" on the derailleur until the jockey wheel on the derailleur is aligned perfectly over the small cassette cog. Set the cable adjuster on the derailleur to the middle of its range (find this by screwing it all the way in and then count how many revolutions it makes until it screws out completely. Screw it back in one half of the total revolutions). Reattach the cable and shift to the lowest gear (the biggest cog). Over-shift and hold on the shifter, then adjust the "L" screw on the derailleur until the jockey wheel sits just past the last cog. You have to hold the shifter to do this. Now shift into the middle gear (or one of the two middle gears if the bike has an even number of gears) and adjust the derailleur using the barrel adjuster you previously set to the middle of its range. Adjust it so that the derailleur is sitting perfectly over the appropriate gear. Shift up and down the cassette while pedaling and in every gear, reverse pedal (freewheel) to make sure the chain does not hop. Adjust as necessary until all gears are smooth.
Now the front:
Set the rear derailleur to the lowest gear (big cog) and the front to the lowest gear (small chain ring). Disconnect the derailleur cable. Screw in the adjuster for the cable tension all the way (this adjuster is on the shifter of a mountain bike or the down tube of a road bike). Pedal to make sure the chain is not rubbing on the derailleur cage. If it is, adjust the "L" setting on the derailleur until the chain moves by without touching the cage. Now pull taut and reattch the cable and shift the front to the big ring while pedaling. If it does not shift up well or completely, hold the shifter past its normal shift and adjust the "H" screw so that the derailleur allows the shift. Shift into the highest cassette gear and keep pedaling. The chain should not be touching the front derailleur's cage when you pedal. Adjust with the barrel adjuster until the chain moves freely without touching the derailleur cage.
That should be it, unless there is another mechanical problem causing the missed shifts, like a bent derailleur hanger or damaged teeth on the cassette cogs or a bad derailleur. If it is still problematic, come back for further information.

i hope this helps
-matthew

Oct 26, 2009 | Cycling

1 Answer

Slipping while cranking


The rachets in the rear gear cog have gone bad.  Buy a new gear cluster and have it installed on your rear wheel.  about $30

Mar 26, 2009 | Mountain Bike Bmx Fit Gt Haro Chrome...

1 Answer

Foot gear pedal moves but bike wont go into gear. pedal is reaaly lose and ideas? the pedal got caught on a gate an was ripped down which has caused the problem. pedal feels like it has been stripped on...


Wish I could see the bike but the following may help. Remove the shift pedal and look at the mounting hole. It should have groves in it which align with groves on the outside on the shifting shaft. If the groves on the shaft and / or the pedal are messed up, ( stripped ), then you need to decide what repair will work. Try re-mounting the pedal on the shaft and see if tightening the mount bolt extra tight will work. If not, you could pin the shift lever to the shaft. I don't know what bike this is but you probably have more serious problems than just a stripped shift lever or stripped shaft.......

...... A shift drum pin may have been sheared. The shift lever return spring and / or shift lever drum spring may have been broken or knocked out of place. The shift lever positioning C ring may have broken allowing the shift shaft to be out of place and not catching the shift pins. These are relatively minor problems to fix but the likelyhood is that you now have a bent shift fork......

...... A bent shift fork requires the engine be removed and torn down to about 75 pieces then reassembled with new shift fork(s). I have done this repair many times as a bike shop mechanic. Some special tools are needed and a good bit of knowhow. This is not a repair for the beginner. How about you take the bike to a dealer and ask them to just glance at the shifter and see what they think. It won't cost you to just ask for their ideas on the problem. Please post how you come out on this. I am curious what you find.

Mar 11, 2009 | 2005 Suzuki TF 125 Mud Bug

Not finding what you are looking for?
Cycling Logo

Related Topics:

116 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Cycling Experts

Michial Gueffroy

Level 3 Expert

1138 Answers

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

John Egan
John Egan

Level 2 Expert

73 Answers

Are you a Cycling Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...