Question about Nikon D700 Digital Camera

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Focus problems with Nikon D700

When shooting photos, it seems every 3 photos are focussing correctly. (eg one photo will focus on subject in background blur the foreground, one photo will focus on a subject to one side, and the last one will focus in the centre). Is there something in the menu I can adjust to enhance the focus quality.

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Use center fous mode dont keep multi focusing mode

Posted on Jun 18, 2009

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Best settings for portrait photos


Be sure auto focus is on; M/A on lens; AF on body (left of lens front side). Aim focus area on the closest eye. Use big opening on short tele lens, to get some isolation from background.
Idea: Use an (old) fixed focus lens 105 2.5 or 50 1.8.

May 06, 2014 | Nikon D70s Digital Camera

1 Answer

2 problems. I have the Coolpix L100. Sometimes my photos are blurry and also. there is a delay when I snap a photo which isnt good when trying to get action photos.


With autofocus digital cameras, blurred photos are almost always a result of camera shake. You need to hold the camera still even after pressing the button, as there is often a short delay before the shutter fires.

Many digital cameras have a two-stage shutter press- first pressure causes the camera to focus, then the follow through pressure takes the picture. If you are rushing this, you may get unfocussed shots.

If you take lots of action pictures, you will have to work on a technique of partially pressing the shutter to get focus in anticipation of the shot (perhaps focussing on where the action will occur), then holding it part-pressed until the moment you want to capture. This is really no more of a problem than setting an anticipatory focus on a manual focussing film camera use to be. Some more complex digital cameras will allow you to turn off auto focus and focus manually.

Nov 05, 2010 | Nikon COOLPIX L100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I have a Nikon D40x digital camera. The problem began when the screen began showing some type of diagram over the picture I had just taken. The camera then started having difficulty with auto focus. ...


Seems possible that the servo control /main processor control is faulty and will need help from Nikon service , It will be better to get a evaluation for the fault and so we can have a consenses on the fault.
get estimate and decide.

Sep 28, 2010 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

1 Answer

My camera will not focus. I have a 50mm lens and 200mm and neither will focus


Which exact lenses are you trying to use? The N2000 (aka F301) is a manual focus camera so if you're trying to use autofocus lenses you have to focus them manually. Sorry if this seems an insulting suggestion, but you did state "my camera will not focus" and I've learned that on FixYa it's best not to assume any prior level of knowledge with regard to those who post questions.

The next thing to check is whether the viewfinder has an eyecup attached, if so slide it upwards to remove it as sometimes they have a corrective lens fitted if the previous user needed corrective optics. If your vision is fine (with glasses/contact lenses if necessary) then a corrective lens on the viewfinder may make things look blurry.

Other than that, the only other possible cause (other than a pair of broken lenses) is if the focussing screen has become dislodged downwards (or somehow fitted upside-down) then the viewfinder image will be unsharp. Officially the F301/N2000 had a fixed focussing screen but it could be replaced with one of three designed for the higher specified F501 (which does have autofocus), and if not seated correctly you'd get the focussing issue you describe.

You can test if the focussing screen is the problem in one of two ways:-
1. A visual inspection (you may need to get a more experienced photographer to take a look at it);

2. Set the lens to focus at infinity and at the widest possible aperture and take a photograph of a distant object (ignoring the blurred viewfinder). process the film and inspect the photo. If it's sharp then you have a focussing screen problem. If not, then it's a lens problem.

If the problem is a poorly fitted focussing screen then it may just need reseating or to be removed and refitted. It's vital to do this in a dust free environment and to avoid getting fingerprints on the screen. Some screens sit in a hinged frame which then clips into place when pushed up, others push into a pair of clips towards the top rear and then the front is held in place by a spring clip: it's been a long while since I worked on the F501 or F301 so I don't recall which system is used.

Courtesy of Norman Butkus' website, click here for a free Nikon N2000 user manual.

I hope that you've found my answer to be of use, if so please return the favour by rating my answer.

Feb 06, 2010 | Nikon N2000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

I dont understand the depth of feid button


Depth of field is one of the most useful creative controls on any camera.

It enables you to see how any given aperture setting will affect how much of your photographic scene will be in sharp focus. Aperture settings don't just affect how much light enters the lens, they determine how much of the scene in front of and behind the subject which you've focussed on will also be in focus. The distance between the nearest object in sharp focus and the most distant is called the depth of field.
Wide open apertures (i.e. lowest numbers) give you the shallowest depth of field and vice-versa.

Modern cameras always show the image in the viewfinder or LCD using the lens aperture wide open, regardless of what you've actually set: this allows maximum light into the lens to allow you to clearly see the scene and the lens only close down to the correct aperture at the moment that you press the shutter. The depth of field button (more correctly called the depth of field preview button) enables you to close down the aperture to what it's actually been set to so that you can see exactly what is in sharp focus; when you press it the scene will darken as there will be less light entering the camera, but if you look at a foreground or background subject which is out of focus before you press the button you'll notice that it becomes sharper when you activate the preview. The button will not have any effect at all if you have the lens set to it's maximum (lowest number) aperture, as the aperture that you're viewing the scene at is identical to the one you're taking the photo at.

Understanding depth of field and how you can manipulate it is vital to taking stunning photos:-

Say you want to take a photo of a bee on a flower: if you leave the camera set to auto, or select a medium to small aperture then the photo will show the bee, the flower, and everything in front and behind making a confusing and busy shot. If you select a wide open aperture then the bee will be in sharp focus (if you're really close, maybe only it's head), the flower, or parts of it will be in sharp focus, and the foreground and background will blur out making the bee and the flower the most important compositional elements in your shot.

Alternatively, you may be in a situation where you need to lift your camera quickly and take a shot without disturbing the subject. You don't know exactly how far away your subject will be, but you know it will be between, say, five feet and twenty feet. If you use your camera as normal, you'll see the shot, lift the camera to your eye, wait for focus (if using an autofocus camera, it might not even focus on what you intend). By the time the shutter has activated the moment has passed or the subject has seen or heard you and gone. Using depth of field you can manually prefocus to a point about a third of the way into your d.o.f. (in this case, ten feet) and select the correct aperture to give you a fifteen foot d.o.f. The setting varies with the lens, but you'll almost always get away with f8). When you see the right shot you just lift the camera and fire without worrying about focus and if you've done so correctly your subject will be sharply focussed. Of course, you could set the lens to minimum aperture, but this can result in the shutter speed being too low for the light conditions and causing unsharpness due to movement of the subject or your camera.

The technique is known as hyperfocal focussing and it explains why some lenses have various markings on them in various colours with aperture numbers next to them, they're a simple depth of field calculator for any given aperture setting. I'd provide a link but it's better if you search yourself as some sites go into what may be far too much detail about the subject.

Hope this has helped you, all that I ask in return is that you take a moment to rate my answer. If there's anything which you want me to clarify further then add a comment to my answer and I'll return as soon as I can to assist you some more.

Jan 30, 2010 | Nikon N80 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Shutter frame rate drops to about 1 per sec on CH with MB D10 while using any auto focus lens. 14-24,24-70 or 70-200 and an older 20mm auto focus. With no lens or a manual focus, very old 55mm Micro, lens...


Wow, that's weird. Does it do it with the auto-focus switch on the body turned to manual? I shoot a D300 and know pretty much everything about it there is to know and the D700 is basically the same camera with a full frame sensor. The only things I know of that drop CH frame rate are shooting in 16-bit raw and it shouldn't kill it like that, using full-auto with tracking will also cause a lag in auto-focus but that still doesn't seem right here. If it only does it with the auto focus on then it may have trash on the AF screen in the camera and needs to be cleaned. Try setting the body switch to manual focus, remove the grip and shoot jpeg and see if it still happens. If it does, reset the menu settings and try again. If it still does it than you probably need to give it a trip to Nikon. If it quits than start putting things back one at a time until you figure out what is doing it.
Somebody told me that Nikon will clean the pro cameras for free once a year while under warranty, I haven't looked into it yet to make sure.

Nov 01, 2009 | Nikon D700 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Appears in focus in viewfinder, but isn't


Change your focusing setting to spot focus. Then, focus on your main subject, keep the button half-way pressed while you re-compose the shot and then press it the rest of the way. Does that improve the shot?

Sep 21, 2009 | Nikon D100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Takes photo but no picture ( Very slightly exposed)


Have you mounted the lens correctly? Try cleaning the contacts of both the body and the lens using an eraser. Take care that no dust falls into the body.

Mar 02, 2009 | NetBotz Cameras

1 Answer

Slight blur shooting variety of subjects


It is just a possibility but you may have overrode the auto focus. If you accidentally move the focussing ring it disables the auto focus.

Mar 17, 2008 | Nikon 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 G ED-IF AF-S VR...

1 Answer

Focusing Difficulties


1. Typical problem subjects for autofocus 1) Very low-contrast subjects 2) Overlapping nearby and distant objects 3) Very bright subjects in the center 4) Subjects moving very fast 5) Subjects through glass Focus on an object that is at the same distance as the desired subject, apply Focus Lock, and then recompose the picture. Or set the lens focus mode switch to (or), and focus manually. (Manual focus is only possible with cameras providing this feature.) 2. Attempting to take pictures out of the camera's shooting distance: When taking pictures out of the camera's shooting distance, the subject will be out of focus. The shooting distance differs from each camera model. Please check the specifications of your camera in the instruction manual to determine the shooting distance.

Aug 29, 2005 | Canon PowerShot SD10 / IXUS I Digital...

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