Question about Dell RADEON X800SE, (128 MB) PCI Express Graphic Card

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Connected pc to hgtv using the analog pc port on tv and trying to get 1360 x 768 resolution. I have a radeon x800se video driver. Any advice when I set the resolution to 1360 it's very distorted.

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Try this 1024 by 768 pixels

Posted on Jun 15, 2009

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How do i get laptop onto tv?


Set it on top of the TV, use glue if needed ;-). Just kidding...

Well, if both your laptop and TV have an analog video port, you can use that. Or, if they both have an HDMI and/or DVI video port. Otherwise, your probably SOL.

For the analog video port (DB9 connector, looks similar to a serial port), you will need a video cable first (see Radio Shack or similar store). Both the TV and the laptop need to be COMPLETELY OFF prior to physically connecting them together with the video cable (not necessary for HDMI or DVI) or you could FRY one or both of them! Prior to turning on the TV, the laptop's video resolution should be adjusted to the TV's native resolution. You'll also have to run sound patch cords from the laptop to the TV's audio in if you want sound (Not needed for HDMI).

You "may" need to setup the video card (either somewhere in the OS, or in the BIOS setup screen) to display to the external video port.

An HDMI or DVI port setup should be much easier to do.

Obviously, you'll need to tell the TV which port(s) to look for the incoming video/audio via your remote control (or look in TV's menu system for that).

Hope this helps, let me know how it turns out...

Sep 15, 2011 | Dell Inspiron 1545 Notebook

2 Answers

How can i connect my sharp lc-26sh10u hdtv to laptop


Sharp had a standard VGA socket on it?, with an adaptor for connecting Component to it (via unused pins). but presumably you simply connect via a VGA lead and select the PC input on the menu
ure HD is cool on a computer monitor, but it's nothing like a huge HDTV.

How you do this will depend primarily on your PC and your HDTV. Lucky for us that they both share some common interfaces. The most common interface is DVI for computers and component for HDTVs. You have a few options here. S-Video and Composite won't work because they only carry SD signals and what fun would that be?
Before we get started I want to mention that all TV's are subjective to some overscan, yes all, but some more than others. At the very least 2% and at the very most 10%. Normally you don't notice, but when displaying your desktop on your HDTV even a small amount of overscan is noticeable. If you plan to watch movies and other videos it won't bother you. If you are planning to surf the web or play video games it can be more intrusive.

If you are one of the lucky ones who have a DVI port on your computer and a DVI or HDMI port on your HDTV. You can buy a180px-video_standards.png cable and set your computers output resolution to one that is supported by your HDTV. That is This seems pretty simple, but unfortunately it isn't always that simple. HDTVs and computer monitors don't always support the same resolutions. All the video standards are covered in this image. It is confusing but useful. The main thing to pick up from the image is that PC's don't use the same native resolution as HDTVs. Some HDTVs can accept standard PC resolutions like my Sharp AQUOS. To see which resolutions your HDTV supports check out the manual. Most companies have their manuals online so if you don't have yours head over to the manufacturer's website to look it up.

As you can see from the grid my HDTV supports most resolutions, the other great thing about this TV, is that there is no overscan at PC resolutions, but there is at normal HDTV resolutions. Unfortunately this is not the norm, but if you are one of the lucky few then you can grab a cable and connect it.sharpres_small.jpg

You can use VGA, component , DVI or HDMI to carry HD signals. Since digital is generally preferred you should use either DVI or HDMI. If your HDTV has a HDMI and since no computers have HDMI yet you will need to use an adapter from DVI to HDMI. Lucky for us, HDMI uses the same signaling technology as DVI.

Before you plug in your DVI cable from your PC to your HDTV be sure to set the resolution to one that is compatible with your HDTV. If your computer monitor and your HDTV only share one common resolution, set it to that until after you get a picture on the HDTV, then change it to the desired resolution. When possible always try to use the displays native resolution. For example my Sharp AQUOS's native resolution is 1280x768.

If the desired resolution isn't available from the display controls of your PC then you will need to add it. You can use apstrip_small.jpg great piece of software called Powerstrip to do this. Install it and then add the desired resolutions. To add a custom From here you can add a preset or user defined resolution. If your TV only accepts 1080i then use "1920x1080i 60hz". resolution to PowerStrip go into display profiles, then "Advanced timing options", then choose "Custom Resolutions". User defined resolutions are beyond the scope of this guide. The best article I have ever read on how to do this, is at the AVSForum. So check it out, but keep in mind that Powerstrip includes most of the HD resolutions for you, so you don't have to copy and paste the timings in yourself as described in the article. If you are a Mac user look for DisplayConfigX. Linux users need to add the custom resolution to their xorg.conf, you can find help here.
vgatocomponent.gif
Unfortunately for most of us, it isn't this easy. Most HDTVs only accept a few resolutions and some only have component input. Since most PCs don't have component output, it can be a bit more difficult. Your best bet is to either buy a video card that supports component output like a Radeon X600, or to buy a VGA to component converter. Since the convert costs as much as a good video card, it usually makes sense to go with the new Video card. When shopping for a video card keep in mind that sometimes the adapter doesn't come with the card, even though the card supports it. My Radeon 9700 required me to buy an additional $29.99 adapter to unlock the component functionality. Luckily most of the newer Radeon cards now come with the cable. As always when using a cutting edge video card be sure to use the latest driver. But don't be scared to roll back a few versions if you have problems. The latest Radeon drivers have HDTV resolutions built right in, so there is no need for Powerstrip. You can still use it to tweak your setup if you want, not to mention the other 100 things it is good at. If you end up using the VGA to component adapter, then you will need Powerstrip to setup the correct resolution. Don't be afraid to try different resolutions to find the best one. I find that because all HDTVs have overscan, non standard HDTV resolutions can help to eliminate the overscan. It is important to keep in mind that it is possible to break your TV by sending it the wrong resolution. So make sure you understand what you are doing before you start to experiment too much. I wouldn't use any resolutions that is not preset without first reading the thread over at AVS.

Try it ..All the best

Dec 23, 2007 | Televison & Video

1 Answer

I have my Microsoft Vista machine using an LG monitor, plus I have the video card (An ATI Radeon 5800 series, I believe)'s second DVI output connected to my LG HDTV. In Windows I have it extending the...


If that doesn't solve it, try rolling the driver back to the previous driver(for the ATI radeon card) as some times updates are just no good for your needs as I have found recently.

Apr 12, 2010 | LG 42LC2D 42 in. LCD HDTV

2 Answers

Have Dell Dimension 2400 and wanting to connect to Emerson LD195EMX.. attach to PC Monitor connection but no scrren comes up/// WHat else can I do?


Is the PC monitor connection - a DVI or DVI-I connection a 15-pin VGA connection an RCA video connection?
Have you set the television input to match the connector used on the TV?
The display resolution on your computer may not be set to a resolution your TV can handle. There is no point trying to put a 1280 by 800 signal into a VGA connector. Start with 640 by 480. However, this will not give you the high resolution you have come to expect from your PC's monitor.
This set also has HDMI input. If your computer has a DVI or DVI-I output, you can buy an adapter that will connect to that HDMI input. Note that this will only handle the video portion of the output from your computer and you will have to use analog connections for the sound and figure out which TV menu input selections allow high definition video with analog sound (not all sets can do this).
Note that LED TVs are not like CRT TVs where an electron beam can put a dot anywhere on the screen. An LED TV has fixed resolution modes.
It might be necessary to use a software product like "PowerStrip" to create a custom resolution mode that will show a high resolution image that will fill the screen of your TV. I wound up using 1352 x 648 to give a full screen image on my LED TV using the HDMI input. ("Your mileage may vary.")
There is a lot more to connecting a high resolution computer display to an LED TV than just plugging it into the "PC Input".

Jan 02, 2010 | Sylvania LD195EMX 19 in. TV

1 Answer

Ati radeon grafix card 9550/x1050 monitor signal out of range


Hi,

Try to check the screen resolution and the screen refresh rate. Try to set it first to 60hz for the screen refresh rate and try to set the screen resolution to 1024 x 768.

Aug 31, 2009 | ATI RADEON HD 2400 PRO Graphic Card

2 Answers

Dell Desktop DX270 doesn't work with LG w2052TQ monitor...


A Dell Optiplex GX270 can have either on on-board VGA integrated graphics controller or an expansion graphics controller. If an expansion card is installed, the onboard graphics is disabled.

So first, ensure that the VGA cable is connected to the correct graphics connection (If there is an expansion slot with a video connector, ten you must use that connection)

If connected to the correct port on the system, next ensure that the input select for the monitor is either set to autoselect or ANALOG

Last ensure that the display resolution of the graphics adapter will support the new monitor.

Feb 05, 2009 | Dell OptiPlex GX270 PC Desktop

1 Answer

Connecting LG DVD recorder to cable box and HGTV digitally


Two things come to mind: copy protection and resolution settings.
The TV may not allow copy protected material to come from your LG, or the sampling frequency may be unacceptable. On page 15 of the manual it talks about 96kHz and 48kHz frequency settings. The third thing to check is the vertical resolution using the RES button on the front panel. SDTV is 480, and HDTV is anything above that. Using the HDMI is supposed to allow upconvert to 1080i max if your set can use that resolution.
tom

Jan 02, 2009 | LG DR787T DVD Recorder

1 Answer

Input button says there is a setting for computer but manual does not give instructions


there are a number of methods that will allow you to make the connection. Many computers have incorporated composite (RCA) or S-Video (TV-Out) output that will either mirror or, better yet, extend your desktop beyond the monitor. For desktop systems, there are numerous AGP video cards available that offer a variety of video outputs. For example, ATI's Radeon X1950 PRO video card includes composite, s-video, and component video connections for analog signals. Of course, it all depends on what inputs your television can accept. If it has multiple input ports, remember that there is a hierarchy in terms of signal quality among the three typical types of connections, which, from lowest to highest, is composite, S-Video, then component video. So opt for the highest quality connection supported by both devices. Many older or more basic televisions may only have a coaxial cable connection. In this case, there are video cards with coax outputs and scan converters that will pass the signal through a coaxial cable directly to your television. Oh, and remember that you'll also need to connect your sound card's LINE-OUT connector to the TV for sound.
The tricky part may be finding the right cables to go from the computer to the TV, since there are several types of RCA (1 or multi-port) and S-Video (4-pin and 7-pin) connectors. One product I found, the Pro S-Video to 3 RCA cable allows you to connect your desktop or laptop computer's S-Video to your TV. These adapters are compatible with both S-video 4-pin and 7-pin receptacles and also connect your PC's stereo audio output to the TV.
But don't run out and buy any special video cards or cables yet... There are certain limitations of using older CRT televisions as computer displays that can easily render the advantages of size and affordability almost completely negligible. Perhaps the greatest constraint is the relatively low resolution of standard, tube-based televisions. Because of their design to accept NTSC (North American), PAL (European), or SECAM signals, good old-fashioned analog television sets generally cannot display resolutions greater than 640x480. That was barely adequate for a 14-inch monitor ten years ago, so just imagine how it might look on a 32-inch TV screen. Have you ever tried to read those fuzzy disclaimers at the end of a TV commercial? Viewing your computer's video signal through a CRT television will not yield the detail and clarity that you would normally expect, although for games and video playback it can produce acceptable results.

Sep 23, 2008 | RCA TruFlat 27F520T 27" TV

1 Answer

ATI RAdeon HD2400 in Dell Optiplex 755.


From the AMD.Com website: Display Support
  • One Dual-Link DVI-I connector for high-resolution digital displays
  • ATI Radeon™ DVI-I to HDMI2 with 5.1 audio (adapter)
  • One VGA analog connector
  • HDTV Component (YPrPb) output (adapter)
  • Drive two displays simultaneously with independent resolutions and refresh rates4
  • TV output requires HDMI, component, S-video or composite cable (not included)
Two integrated DVI display outputs
  • Primary supports 18-, 24-, and 30-bit digital displays at all resolutions up to 1920x1200 (single-link DVI) or 2560x1600 (dual-link DVI)1
  • Secondary supports 18-, 24-, and 30-bit digital displays at all resolutions up to 1920x1200 (single-link DVI only)1
  • Each includes a dual-link HDCP encoder with on-chip key storage for high resolution playback of protected content2
It does using dual link DVI. Is that the cable you are using?

Here is a link to the complete specs

Sep 15, 2008 | ATI RADEON HD 2400 PRO Graphic Card

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