Question about Fujitsu 24C1 Air Conditioner

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I want to know the wiring connection between the compressor and thermostat then to fan in central air conditions

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  • Ken Bledsoe May 11, 2010

    The compressor is 230 volt and the thermostat is 24 volt. They are not wired together. Your control voltage operates the equipment. By using relay's and contactors.

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The "thermostat" is actually on the control board of the indoor unit, and is operated through the hand-held remote control. The remote also controls the indoor fan speed through the same board. The outdoor fan is a 2-speed, and is also controlled by the board in the indoor unit. The closest you'll get to a wiring diagram is on the inside of the cover where the wiring connections are made on the outdoor unit.
I had a condenser (outdoor) fan go bad, and it wiped out the control board, the power supply board, contactor, even the remote control, and eventually the compressor.

Posted on Jun 16, 2009

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Check the wiring diagrams on the panels...

Posted on Jun 16, 2009

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1 Answer

Central unit


Seems like defective wiring or thermostat. The thermostat wires needs be checked. Another thing if the ac unit has economizer feature.
With the thermostat removed, if possible wires still connected to thermostat base, jump R-G, indoor fan should turn on: jump R-Y, compressor and outdoor fan should start (may feature a few minutes time delay): jump R-W, heater should start and indoor fan after a time delay.
What you want to see is R-G and R-Y working and if this is no problem, the thermostat may be due for replacement

Jun 21, 2015 | Heating & Cooling

Tip

How to fix problem of Air conditioner doesn't cool


How to troubleshoot and repair the most common problems with your central air conditioner Although some central air conditioner repairs must be handled by a qualified air-conditioning repairperson, you can handle simple repairs and maintenance yourself. Following, you'll find guidance based on the symptoms.

Air conditioner doesn't cool A central air conditioner that runs but doesn't cool may just need to be cleaned. Plan to do this on a relatively warm day. The following are basic guidelines, but always refer to your owner's manual.
1) Before you begin, turn off the power to the unit. There is normally a shut-off or disconnect panel on the house wall next to the outdoor compressor. Also shut off the air conditioner's 240-volt circuit at the main electrical panel.
2) Rake leaves and debris away from the outdoor condenser. Trim any bushes that might block airflow.
3) Unscrew and remove protective grilles and the top cover or grille from the compressor. If the fan is attached to the grille, be careful not to pull any wires loose.
4) Use a soft brush to clean dirt and debris from the fins, and then vacuum the fins with a brush attachment (taking care not to damage the fins).
5) From inside the unit, use a hose and nozzle with a trigger-grip to spray debris from the fins (protect the wiring and motor with plastic sheeting or a large plastic garbage bag). If your owner's manual calls for lubricating the motor, do that now--but don't overlubricate.
6) Reassemble the unit.
7) To test it, turn the thermostat to "Off," reset the power at the disconnect by the compressor and the main panel, and then set the thermostat to turn the unit on. Important note: To avoid straining an air conditioner's compressor, wait at least five minutes between turning it off at the thermostat and turning it back on. Let it run for a few minutes, and then feel the two pipes that connect to the condenser unit on the air handler (slide any insulation back). One should feel warm, the other cool.

on Sep 02, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

A/c won't stop running and no cool air


There seems to be a problem with the wiring of the thermostat. Apparently the thermostat is calling for cool (if wired properly), but is not being satisfied. The thermostat is just a switch. When there's a call for cool, the thermostat sends 24-28 volts to the contactor (inside the condensing unit to start the compressor and outdoor fan). The indoor fan is energized through the fan relay (inside the air handler). When the temperature in the conditioned space reaches the set temperature,then the thermostat cuts the power to the contactor and it stops the compressor and outdoor fan. Check that the compressor is actually running, if not, check for 24-28 volts on the wires feeding the contactor, if there is, and the contactor isn't closing then the contactor is defective. If the contactor closes and the compressor doesn't come on, check the capacitor. If the capacitor is good then check your compressor motor. I suspect you have an improperly wired thermostat

Aug 26, 2013 | Honeywell PRO 4000 5-2 Day Programmable...

1 Answer

Have a goodman central air unit, non heat pump. keeps smoking transformers, on the inside unit, replaced fan capacitor and transformer as the old transformer was smoked as well. But to no avail the new...


There is a short in the control wiring that needs to be tracked down. Ohm the wiring to the low voltage controls, ie thermostat wiring and thermostat. Try disconnecting the thermostat wires to rule out the problem in the control wiring to the thermostat or thermostat itself, then install a new transformer without connecting the thermostat wiring, jump the red and green wire at the unit low voltage connections to test blower, and then add yellow for compressor, should be no more than 3 amps on control side wiring with A/C on.
If the problems still exists without the thermostat wiring connected then there is a problem in the wiring in the unit or control board itself.

Aug 24, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

York central unit condenser does not run. Red Led light on circuit board keeps blinking.


Hello,

There seem to be a problem with the unit that is why it is acting that way. If the air conditioner is not working but has the power light blinking. Yet the fan is not running, then you need to troubleshoot the unit. There are some tips for troubleshooting the air conditioner to be able to detect the problem and know the best appropriate procedure to solving the problem.

A few basic principles for air conditioner troubleshooting. For both central home air conditioner or window air conditioner, the first thing to check is whether the unit is getting proper power. If the unit uses 220 volt power be sure that the proper voltage is getting to the unit. Same for 110 volt units. A voltage meter can be used to assure that the voltage is correct.

For window air conditioning units the voltage can also be checked before and after the thermostat. If voltage is being supplied to the thermostat but not from it then the thermostat probably needs replaced. This is a fairly common problem. Another place to check is the fan motor voltage. The fan on window air conditioners runs both the indoor blower and the condenser fan. If that motor fails than the compressor may run for a short time, but will overheat and shut off. Continued operation like this will result in compressor failure. This motor can be economically replaced for larger window air conditioners, but for smaller ones the cost of replacement will be more than a new unit.

Central air conditioners for the home are more complex and there are more things that can go wrong. As with the window air conditioner the thermostat can also be a problem. The central air conditioner thermostat will only have 24 volts going to it. So don't look for high voltage there. Some units the voltage will be coming from the outdoor unit and others the voltage will be supplied by the indoor air handler or furnace. Most home central air conditioning will be supplied by the indoor air handler or the furnace. If the air conditioner is for cooling only the unit will usually have only two wires going to the condenser unit. Make sure that you have 24 volts across those wires.

The next thing to check will be the indoor blower. If your thermostat is calling for cooling then the indoor blower should be running. If there is no air moving across the indoor cooling coil then you will soon have a big block of ice formed on the coil. This can happen for a few reasons. The indoor blower is not working, the air flow is restricted and not allowing air to move across the coil. A clogged air filter would also do this. Or the outdoor condenser unit has lost the charge of refrigerant.

Finally and worst of all is when you have a complete compressor failure. Often when this happens the compressor will "lock up" or not be able to turn when power is supplied to it. Overheating or lack of lubrication are usually the main causes of compressor failure. Overheating can be caused by the outdoor coil around the compressor getting clogged with dirt, leaves, or grass. Loss of the refrigerant charge will also cause the compressor to overheat. It is the cool return gas coming back to the compressor that helps to keep it from overheating.

As you can see there are many things that can go wrong with an air conditioner and I have not come close to exhausting the possibilities here. I have just touched on the most common problems in a very basic way.

There are some basic trouble shooting things that can be done very easily. Most problems are above out of the range of comfort for many homeowners and professional help should be consulted before any attempt is made at repairs.

Good luck.

Jul 14, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Kenmore central air conditioning unit tripping breaker each time we turn it on.


The breaker tripping when you turn the unit on indicates a 'direct short' and 99 out of a 100 times the short will be either the outside fan motor or the compressor itself. Either way - you will need a qualified serviceperson to diagnose this problem correctly and make the needed repairs.
Best solution is to call AC person.
However, here's a good way you can get it down to either the fan motor or the compressor.
(1) With all power OFF - disconnect the wires to the fan motor
(2) turn on AC unit (a) if breaker trips it means the compressor is probably the shorted component. (b) if breaker DOES NOT trip and the compressor runs - it means the fan motor is shorted.
(3) If breaker tripped with the fan motor disconnected meaning the compressor is probably shorted you can then (with ALL POWER OFF) 'disconnect the wires going to the compressor' and re-connect the fan motor wires. Turn on power - and if fan motor runs (with compressor wires off) you know it's the compressor that is shorted.
After all this you will now know which of the two (compressor or fan motor) is shorted.
If it's the fan motor you can with 'limited mechanical experience' change the motor yourself, but if it's the compressor you will need to call a serviceperson because of the expertise needed to replace the compressor.

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1 Answer

Haier air conditioner will not kick on to air conditioner mode, only the fan runs, but does not cool like air conditioner should cool, just blows as a fan.


A few basic principles for air conditioner troubleshooting. For both central home air conditioner or window air conditioner, the first thing to check is whether the unit is getting proper power. If the unit uses 220 volt power be sure that the proper voltage is getting to the unit. Same for 110 volt units. A voltage meter can be used to assure that the voltage is correct.

For window air conditioning units the voltage can also be checked before and after the thermostat. If voltage is being supplied to the thermostat but not from it then the thermostat probably needs replaced. This is a fairly common problem. Another place to check is the fan motor voltage. The fan on window air conditioners runs both the indoor blower and the condenser fan. If that motor fails than the compressor may run for a short time, but will overheat and shut off. Continued operation like this will result in compressor failure. This motor can be economically replaced for larger window air conditioners, but for smaller ones the cost of replacement will be more than a new unit.

Central air conditioners for the home are more complex and there are more things that can go wrong. As with the window air conditioner the thermostat can also be a problem. The central air conditioner thermostat will only have 24 volts going to it. So don't look for high voltage there. Some units the voltage will be coming from the outdoor unit and others the voltage will be supplied by the indoor air handler or furnace. Most home central air conditioning will be supplied by the indoor air handler or the furnace. If the air conditioner is for cooling only the unit will usually have only two wires going to the condenser unit. Make sure that you have 24 volts across those wires.

The next thing to check will be the indoor blower. If your thermostat is calling for cooling then the indoor blower should be running. If there is no air moving across the indoor cooling coil then you will soon have a big block of ice formed on the coil. This can happen for a few reasons. The indoor blower is not working, the air flow is restricted and not allowing air to move across the coil. A clogged air filter would also do this. Or the outdoor condenser unit has lost the charge of refrigerant.

Finally and worst of all is when you have a complete compressor failure. Often when this happens the compressor will "lock up" or not be able to turn when power is supplied to it. Overheating or lack of lubrication are usually the main causes of compressor failure. Overheating can be caused by the outdoor coil around the compressor getting clogged with dirt, leaves, or grass. Loss of the refrigerant charge will also cause the compressor to overheat. It is the cool return gas coming back to the compressor that helps to keep it from overheating.

As you can see there are many things that can go wrong with an air conditioner and I have not come close to exhausting the possibilities here. I have just touched on the most common problems in a very basic way.
There are some basic trouble shooting things that can be done very easily. Most problems are above out of the range of comfort for many homeowners and professional help should be consulted before any attempt is made at repairs. Remember also, that the release of refrigerant gases into the atmosphere is a federal offense in the
US. Proper care must always be taken to minimize the release of any gases. A license is also required to handle refrigerants. Make sure that the professional you call has the proper certifications to handle refrigerants properly.


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May 29, 2011 | Haier HWR08XC7 Air Conditioner

1 Answer

I want to know the conection between the thermostat and the fan and compressor in the central air conditions


r and rc @stat to r on furnace
w @stat to w on furnace
g @ stat to g on furnace
y @ stat to y on furnace
from furnace 2wires going to out side unit typical red & white wire. red goes to y @ furnace and white goes to the neutral of the trans former . BE SAFE turn off power.

r = Red wire Hot
w= White wire heating
g = Green Fan
y= yellow cooling

if their is a B or C @ the furnace terminal board that the neutral . Tom

Jun 14, 2009 | Fujitsu 24C1 Air Conditioner

1 Answer

Central air


Most thermostats have a setting for the fan called, "manual". That keeps the fan on continuously. The electronic thermostats can fail in a "fan on" condition. That would require a new thermostat. I also saw one air conditioner with a fan relay welded "on" by electrical surge. That would require a new relay.

Jul 20, 2008 | LG LWHD1800R Wall/Window Air Conditioner

2 Answers

Air Conditioner malfunction


Hi, Sounds like you have a short in the control circuit to me. Turn off all power going to the unit. Write down or otherwise mark the wires leaving the control board going to the thermostat. Remove them from the control board. Replace the fuse. Turn power back on and see if the fan still runs. If it does, check and or replace the heat limit switch that brings the fan on during the heat cycle. It may just need adjusted. If the fuse blows, I would think that the control board is probably bad. If it doesn't blow, Remove the thermostat. Leaving all thermostat wires open check them with an Ohm meter. There should be no continuity between them. Twist all the wires together at one end and ohm them again at the other end. You should have complete continuity on all wires. If the wiring checks out, down power the unit. Double check your wire colors and rewire the control board. With all wires open at the thermostat, turn the power back on. Touch the RED wire to the YELLOW wire. The Condensing unit should come on. Touch the RED wire to the GREEN wire. The fan should come on. Touch the RED wire to the WHITE wire. The heat should come on. Down power the unit. Replace the thermostat. Test unit. If the fuse has lasted ok but blows now it is either wired wrong at the Thermostat or the thermostat is bad. I hope I have helped. NOTE: If you can not understand these instructions. Call a licensed Heating / Air conditioning company. kstfas

Sep 23, 2007 | Heating & Cooling

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