Question about Generac Electrical Supplies

Open Question

Generac 60KW only produces 177VAC.

New stator, Rotor megged, new mag housing, new voltage regulator. Bridge rectifier verified. All measurements within spec. 277/480VAC.

Posted by on

4 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 225 Answers

SOURCE: Same Problem, diodes fell out of bridge rectifier assembly

pulling to many amps,diodes could not handle amps so they failed.unit should have kicked its breaker before the diodes burned out.most units have their own breaker to protect the system.I would replace the control board first see how unit reacts,probly fine,if not the you go to next step.

Posted on Jun 27, 2009

  • 905 Answers

SOURCE: I have a generator that does not produce any

As long as you have continuity through the stator and rotor windings, and no continuity from the windings to the core, you should be good.

If the brush block was replaced due to it being defective, take a look at the diode and capacitor regulator as well. Using a multimeter, the diode should indicate continuity in one direction, infinite resistance in the other. If you get this, then replace the capacitor. If not, then replace the diode, and likely the capacitor as well.

Posted on Jun 12, 2010

  • 16 Answers

SOURCE: generac portable generator over voltage even with new control board and regulator

is engine running at 3600 to 3700 rpm at full load. most small engines run at this speed.you can buy a small tach on ebay TINY TACH.. you have to know what the engine speed is

Posted on Mar 05, 2013

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

1997 Suzuki GSX-R 750 diagnose charging system


Hi, Ashley before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
5. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
http://www.jetav8r.com/Vision/Stator/fault_finding_by_www.electrosport.com.pdf
HOW TO CHECK YOUR CHARGING SYSTEM and CHANGING the STATOR and REGULATOR...
Suzuki 1996 GSX R750 Service Manual
OEM parts for Suzuki
http://mybikemanuals.com/suzuki/suzuki-gsx-owners-manuals

May 29, 2017 | Suzuki GSX-R 750 Motorcycles

1 Answer

2005 vl 1500 charging system system not charging checked generator 3 wires giving pluss 80v at 5000rpm instaled new rectifier voltage across battery under 13 volts could faulty battery be problem


Hi, Anonymous the following is a comprehensive charging system test that I found on a Rider Groups website
1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged battery that has been load tested to ensure proper readings. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Most places like Auto Zone, Advance Auto, and Pep Boys will charge and test motorcycle batteries for free. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, Measure DC Volts across the battery terminals (you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts).
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolate the stator & Rotor, If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter leads.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
http://www.crowitis.com/images/VL1500_Charging_System_Wiring_Upgrades.pdf
stator output voltage
http://www.jetav8r.com/Vision/Stator/fault_finding_by_www.electrosport.com.pdf
Suzuki VL1500 Service Manual
OEM parts for Suzuki
Suzuki VZ1500 Owner Manual

Jan 16, 2017 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

I need a rectifier or avr for generac 3500 xl genarator


Ebay and various places including the maker..

  • VOLTAGE-REGULATOR-3000-3500-WATT-GENERATOR-GENERATORS ... www.ebay.com/sch/sis.html?_nkw=VOLTAGE-REGULATOR-3000-3500-WATT... VOLTAGE-REGULATOR-3000-3500-WATT-GENERATOR ... New listing 3500 Watt Generator AVR Automatic ... 3500W Generator AVR Automatic Voltage Rectifier ...
  • 3500 W 3500 Watt Generator AVR Automatic Voltage Regulator ... https://sites.google.com/site/kltthtyz0i04cd/3500-w-3500-watt... Generac Guardian 22kW Standby Generator NG ... Previously Pay for Shop 3500 W 3500 Watt Generator AVR Automatic Voltage Regulator Rectifier 3.5KW Generator AVR ...
  • How to test your Electricity Generator's AVR, Brushes and ... www.youtube.com/watch?v=tC_LrrZcx38
    • BY GENERATOR GURU
    • 9 MIN
    • 454K VIEWS
    2011-10-21 · Video embedded · When your electricity Generator stops producing power, ... How to test your Electricity Generator's AVR, ... Generac iQ: The Quietest Generator ...
  • Generac Power Systems - Home www.generac.com Generac manufactures the widest range of power products in the marketplace including portable, RV, residential, commercial and industrial generators.
  • Generac Guardian Generator Voltage Regulator Rectifier ... www.ebay.com/sch/sis.html?_nkw=Generac+Guardian+Generator+Voltage... Generac Guardian Generator Voltage Regulator Rectifier ... Generac Guardian Generator Voltage Regulator Rectifier ... Generac Guardian Generator Voltage Regulator ...
  • Automatic Voltage Regulator (AVR) for Generators portable.generatorguide.net/avr.html How automatic voltage regulator (AVR) works in portable generators: ... here you can see a reverse engineered Generac regulator that uses SCRs and UJT.
  • Diagnosing A Generator That Has No Power Output. - YouTube Youtube
    • BY THEDIYGUYDOTNET
    • 3 MIN
    • 150K VIEWS
    2012-11-12 · Video embedded · Diagnosing A Generator That Has No Power Output. ... How to test your Electricity Generator's AVR, ... Generac Portable Generator ...
  • GENERATOR Diagram & Parts List for Model 3500xl Generac ... www.searspartsdirect.com > ... > 3500XL GENERAC Generator-Parts GENERATOR Diagram and Parts List for GENERAC Generator-Parts model # 3500XL ... Generator rectifier Part #: ... Generator voltage regulator Part #: ...


  • Jun 28, 2016 | Generac Electrical Supplies

    1 Answer

    My generac generator is producing low voltage


    check voltage input at voltage regulator, then check output from
    the regulator.

    Nov 07, 2013 | Generac 5622 GP Series GP5000 6,250 Watt...

    1 Answer

    My battery drains while riding my 2005 wr450f. Have replaced stator and rectifier


    Hi, Hans the following is a comprehensive charging system test that is guaranteed to the find issue with your system.
    1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
    2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
    3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
    4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
    5. AC Output Check:
    Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
    Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
    Probe both stator wires with your meter lead.
    The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
    Generic Specs:
    22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    Stator Resistance Check:
    Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
    Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
    Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification
    Generic Specs:
    22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
    32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
    45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
    Stator IB test or Ground Check:
    Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
    Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
    There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
    If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
    5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
    Identifying Wires:
    Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
    AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
    Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
    Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
    Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
    Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
    Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
    Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
    The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
    Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
    The reading should be Infinite.
    With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
    The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
    Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
    The reading should be Infinite.
    Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
    Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
    AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
    AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
    Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
    Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
    Ground AC output 1 Voltage
    Ground AC output 2 Voltage
    AC output 1 Ground ?
    AC output 2 Ground ?
    For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
    Flat battery on WR450
    http://www.jetav8r.com/Vision/Stator/fault_finding_by_www.electrosport.com.pdf
    YAMAHA WR450F Owner Service Manual
    OEM parts for Yamaha
    YAMAHA WR450F Owner Manual

    Jun 11, 2012 | 2005 Yamaha WR 450 F

    1 Answer

    Replaced Battery, Stator, and Rectifier on Vstar 650 and still not charging battery?


    Hi, Chrislbryan the following is a comprehensive charging system test that is guaranteed to the find issue with your system.
    1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
    2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
    3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
    4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
    5. AC Output Check:
    Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
    Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
    Probe both stator wires with your meter lead.
    The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
    Generic Specs:
    22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    Stator Resistance Check:
    Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
    Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
    Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification
    Generic Specs:
    22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
    32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
    45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
    Stator IB test or Ground Check:
    Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
    Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
    There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
    If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
    5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
    Identifying Wires:
    Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
    AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
    Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
    Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
    Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
    Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
    Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
    Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
    The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
    Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
    The reading should be Infinite.
    With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
    The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
    Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
    The reading should be Infinite.
    Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
    Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
    AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
    AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
    Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
    Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
    Ground AC output 1 Voltage
    Ground AC output 2 Voltage
    AC output 1 Ground ?
    AC output 2 Ground ?
    For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
    Battery not Charging Yamaha Star Forum
    http://www.jetav8r.com/Vision/Stator/fault_finding_by_www.electrosport.com.pdf
    Yamaha XVS650 Service Manual
    OEM parts for Yamaha
    Yamaha star XVS650P Owner Manual

    Jun 10, 2012 | Yamaha V Star Classic 650 Motorcycles

    1 Answer

    How do you know if a reg/rec has gone


    Hi, Derek before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test because your battery may have 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage and must be replaced AGM types more so than lead acid batteries.
    1. Battery Test:
    The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
    2. Charging System Voltage Test:
    Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
    3. Connections and wires:
    Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
    4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
    5. AC Output Check:
    Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
    Generic Specs:
    22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    Stator Resistance Check:
    Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
    Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
    Generic Specs:
    22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
    32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
    45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
    Stator ground Check:
    Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
    Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
    There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
    If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
    5. Regulator Test:
    Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
    Identifying Wires:
    Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
    AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
    Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
    Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
    Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
    This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
    Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
    Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
    Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
    The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
    Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
    The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
    Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
    Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
    Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
    AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
    AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
    Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
    Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
    Ground AC output 1 Voltage
    Ground AC output 2 Voltage
    AC output 1 Ground ?
    AC output 2 Ground ?
    For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
    Regulator Rectifier Motorbike testing blown or not mp4
    Triumph Daytona 600 Regulator Rectifier upgrade
    Triumph 2003 Daytona 600 Service Manual
    http://www.bikebandit.com/oem-parts/2005-triumph-daytona-600-650-sump/o/m17663sch569813
    Triumph DAYTONA 650 Manual

    May 01, 2017 | 2005 Triumph Daytona 650

    1 Answer

    1988 Honda CBR 250 RR not charging


    Hi, Dtl_80 before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead acid batteries.
    1. Battery Test:
    The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
    2. Charging System Voltage Test:
    Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
    3. Connections and wires:
    Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
    4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
    5. AC Output Check:
    Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
    Generic Specs:
    22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    Stator Resistance Check:
    Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
    Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
    Generic Specs:
    22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
    32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
    45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
    Stator ground Check:
    Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
    Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
    There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
    If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
    5. Regulator Test:
    Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
    Identifying Wires:
    Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
    AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
    Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
    Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
    Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
    This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
    Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
    Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
    Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
    The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
    Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
    The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
    Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
    Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
    Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
    AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
    AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
    Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
    Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
    Ground AC output 1 Voltage
    Ground AC output 2 Voltage
    AC output 1 Ground ?
    AC output 2 Ground ?
    For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
    http://www.cbr250.net/forum/archive/t-28817.html
    http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
    1986 1999 Honda CBR250R CBR250RR Service Manual Moto Data Project
    http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
    Honda CB Owners Manuals

    Jun 26, 2017 | Honda CBR 250 RR Motorcycles

    1 Answer

    Location of 1972 corvette voltage regulator in car


    Hello: The voltage regulator is inside the alternator (generator) The generator can be overhauled. The brushes, diodes, rectifier bridge and voltage regulator all can be replaced along with the stator, rotor and bearings although now days it may be cheaper to replace the alternator.

    Jul 22, 2011 | Chevrolet Corvette Cars & Trucks

    2 Answers

    Not charging, removed the regulator, has three yellow wires from the 3 phase stator, the other three wires I need to know where they go/come_from. I imagine one must be +B the other two??? The three phase...


    (I am the author of the reference thread on TriumphRat that wasposted by another respondent)

    Not personally intimate with the Vulcan, but this is a 'conventional' motorcycle 3 phase stator energized by a crank driven magnetic rotor. 
    The stator is connected in delta to the R/R. There should be NO measurable resistance from any of the three stator output terminals to engine ground - it should be completely isolated.   If you can measure a low resistance (not clear if your 0.2 ohms is from terminal to terminal or terminal to engine ground) then your stator is fried. 
    Regarding the R/R connections - the third wire on the output is one of two functions (unfortunately without benefit of a schematic I cannot definitively conclude for you): either a 'voltage sense' wire, or in some Kawasakis they feed one phase of the stator output back out again for use in the starter cut/latch circuit. It should be reasonably easy to differentiate which it is. 
    Good Luck! 

    Aug 11, 2009 | 1993 kawasaki VN 750 Vulcan

    Not finding what you are looking for?
    Electrical Supplies Logo

    Related Topics:

    20 people viewed this question

    Ask a Question

    Usually answered in minutes!

    Top Generac Electrical Supplies Experts

     Kenneth
    Kenneth

    Level 2 Expert

    50 Answers

    Ottoniel

    Level 2 Expert

    202 Answers

    JOHN LAPIER

    Level 3 Expert

    2428 Answers

    Are you a Generac Electrical Supply Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

    Answer questions

    Manuals & User Guides

    Loading...