Question about Epson Perfection 4180 Photo Flatbed Scanner

1 Answer

Distorted Scans It's hard to describe this problem unless you are looking at enlarged scans. Enlarging the image in Photoshop to actual pixel size you can see the distortions. When I scan a slide or negative some parts in the negative or slide when scanned are smeared or take on a saw-toothed sharp focused appearance. These distortions are not in the original negative or slide. What causes this? Can it be fixed or do I need a new scanner?

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Vice President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 100 times.

  • Master
  • 526 Answers

It could be your not scanner in a high enough resolution. I believe negatives have a 1000 dpi.

Posted on Dec 20, 2009

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
A 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
The service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Good luck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

What is the relation between megapixels and maximun enlargement size


The number of pixels (measured in megapixels only because there's so many of them, the number would be very long if they didn't shorten it down; much like saying gigabyte for hard drives, instead of bytes) directly correlates to how much data has been recorded for a particular image.

Photos aren't "drawn" with lines (which is known as a vector image). They are recorded in pixels (raster image), and each pixel is just a single dot of a single color at a specific place in that photo.

When you look at that photo at a very small size (such as on your monitor), the computer "interpolates" (a fancy word for "guesses") which pixels to hide from view, and kind of remixes the other colors on the screen so it looks like the original photo. (Kind of weird, but it's true.)

The photo is "perfect" when it is the full size (one pixel on-screen to one pixel in-photo ratio). No interpolation is done, so you see exactly what you photographed.

If you enlarge a photo beyond the number of pixels you have, you again have to do interpolation, where the computer has to "guess" which color pixels would blend properly between the real pixels in the gaps that are created when it's stretched beyond what data is there.

So, to answer your question:

The direct relationship is this: If you have too few pixels (as rated in megapixels), and you enlarge the photo too much, then there's too much guesswork done by the computer. It is just kind of filling in colors, and this makes the photo look blurry. It can't create detail where no detail existed before.

The more pixels you have, the larger the print you can make WITHOUT enlarging (or interpolating) it. This makes the result very crisp indeed, because all of the pixels are coming from the photo, not from the guesswork of the computer. Even if you are only enlarging it a small amount, it's going to be infinitely better than enlarging it a larger amount. The more interpolation, the fuzzier it gets.

Oct 02, 2014 | Nikon D750 DSLR Camera Body Only

1 Answer

My new lg 3d tv is closng on top bottom and sides is there anything i can do to cure the problem


Could you provide more information? What do you mean when you say, "closing?" Do you mean there is a black band around the picture? If so that means the original picture is recorded at a lower pixel density than your TV will display.
In the past most TV program signals provided a picture dimensions (in computer standards) very roughly 600 pixels wide by 400 pixels tall. What this means is that a picture of that pixel size will display as a small, squarish image slightly wider than it is tall on a (now) standard 1080p LCD television--which produces an image 1920 pixels wide by 1080 pixels high.
That would be nearly unwatchable (picture too small) except for the fact that most TVs compensate for the relatively small size of "standard definition TV (SD TV, as opposed to HDTV) by enlarging the image so that the top and bottom edges of the picture touch the top and bottom of the TV screen. This will leave black bands on either side of the picture. Some LCD TVs will automatically stretch BOTH dimensions of the image, which yields a distorted, "sqaushed" image.
All my comments above apply to both standard LCD and 3D-LCD TVs, by the way.
A more precise overview of the facts about TV picture size can be found here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Display_resolution

Nov 23, 2013 | LG 42LW5300 42 Class 3D LED HDTV

1 Answer

How to enlarge a picture that is scanned or copied? When i scan or copy a picture it is too small and I want to enlarge it in order to view it better.


hi

Open an image. Go to the Image Menu and select Image Size. This is where you can change an image’s resolution and print size (width and height). The following Image Size dialog box will appear:
image_size_cs.gif
Notethat the width and the height of the image as you view it on yourmonitor is not necessarily representative of the image’s actual widthand height—i.e., the size it would print out at (print size).Average monitor resolution is 72 dpi. If you view a 72 dpi image at100% in Photoshop, chances are that it will appear on your screen inits actual print size. However, this is not true when viewing a 300 dpiimage. A 300 dpi image viewed on-screen at 100% will be enormous. Don’tget tricked into believing that what you see on your monitor is whatyou’ll get when you print or place the image into another application.The best way to determine what your image’s actual print size will beis through the Image Size dialog box.
When the Resample Imagebox is checked, any changes you make to an image’s width or height willnot change the image’s resolution, and as such, any changes you make toan image’s resolution will not affect the image’s width and height.Keep in mind, however, when you increase width and height, orresolution, with the Resample Image box checked, you are adding pixelsto your image. These pixels don’t actually exist so Photoshop mustcreate them. As such, you will succeed only in degrading the quality ofyour image.
If you want to increase an image’swidth and height, or resolution, then uncheck the Resample Image box.Now any changes you make to the image’s width and height will changethe image’s resolution, and vice versa:
  • If you decrease resolution, the width and height will increase.
  • If you increase resolution, the width and height will decrease.
  • If you increase the width or height, the resolution will decrease.
  • If you decrease the width or height, the resolution will increase.
Thebest way to increase the width and height of a scanned image is to scanthe image in at a high resolution (about twice what your finalresolution should be), and with the Resample Image box unchecked, decrease the resolution. Once the image width and height is where you want it, you can then check the Resample Imagebox and type in the resolution you want if the resolution is too high.At this point, as long as you don’t increase resolution, or width andheight, your image quality will not suffer.

Aug 07, 2010 | HP Officejet 5610 All-In-One InkJet...

2 Answers

How do I retouch my photos that have many color pixels missing?


You can use the "blend" or "smear" feature on either GIMP (free) or PhotoShop by Adobe. This basically has the same effect as rubbing your thumb over words on a freshly written page, smearing the adjacent colors to fill in the blank or degraded spots. It's a nice feature to help fill in "blank" spots in images, especially after editing them for concept drawings and such, or enlarging images which are low-resolution.

Be careful with the tool, you can quickly go overboard.

Dec 31, 2009 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Scans are enlarged after switching to vista 64bit


hmmm... just the set pixels properties to medium..maybe the pixels properties is to high..it can cause long time scanning and large images results ..thank you

May 15, 2009 | Canon MultiPASS MP390 All-In-One InkJet...

1 Answer

Fixing small objects


If you mean to enlarge a small low resolution image and make it a large image with good clarity and resolution, basically you can't really do this...

Well you can up to a point, say doubling the pixel size at maximum, but if you don't have the image size and qualitry to begin with, enlarging will rarely produce a clean image if you are enlarging it by a large factor.

Of course you can enlarge some images really well by say 25% by enlarging then using some sharpening filters like "Unsharp Mask" etc. You can get reasonable results this way, but if you are trying to say enlarge a 100 pixel wide image to 1000 pixels wide, it just won't work terribly well no matter how much sharpening or filtering you do!

Hope that helps!

Mar 20, 2009 | Adobe Photoshop CS4 for PC

1 Answer

Image enlargement in photoshop 7


The first question you've asked would take a full lesson to answer completely. If you select Image > Image Size and then choose the method that works best for the type of image you have. You can try each option, only enlarging as much as you need, and choose Undo to go back to what you started with and then try a different option. Perhaps try only enlarging the image a little and stop when it becomes too grainy.

As to 'special text design,' I have no idea what you're asking. What is it you're having problems with? The interface for text in Photoshop is different than most software, but editing text is possible. I'd suggest using the help menu and learning the basics, since the commands operate so differently in Photoshop.

Jan 06, 2009 | Adobe Photoshop imageready 5.5 for PC

1 Answer

Canon ixus 70


Is this on the camera that you want to do it or on photoshop? If on photoshop it only involves cropping the area you want and then enlarging the image size.

May 06, 2008 | Canon PowerShot SD500 / IXUS 700 Digital...

2 Answers

Canon 5D resolution question


The 5D has a 12.8 mega pixel sensor.

2 x 4 ft. is 24 x 48 inches, so you have to cover 1152 sq. inches using 12.5 million pixels.

Spreading 12.5 million pixels over 1152 sq. inches means 10,850 pixels per sq. inch. Taking the square root gives you a maximium resolution of 104 pixels per inch (or 'dpi')

Photoshop will allow you to increase the resolution by a process known as 'interpolation' .. increasing to 300 dpi using Photoshop before printing will give a better result.

NB. Depending on your printing process, you may end up dealing with files up to 500Mb in size ....

Mar 12, 2008 | Canon EOS-5D Digital Camera

Not finding what you are looking for?
Epson Perfection 4180 Photo Flatbed Scanner Logo

248 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Epson Office Equipment & Supplies Experts

Alun Cox

Level 3 Expert

2678 Answers

Donald DCruz
Donald DCruz

Level 3 Expert

17130 Answers

Les Dickinson
Les Dickinson

Level 3 Expert

18424 Answers

Are you an Epson Office Equipment and Supply Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...