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Mount: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on /dev/sdb1, missing codepage or helper program, or other error In some cases useful info is found in syslog - try dmesg | tail or so

I am not able to mount the harddisk in ubuntu or windows

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Chrome OS is damaged or missing


To install the Google Chromium operating system (OS) on your computer, instead of booting it from an image or using an official Google Chrome OS netbook, you must compile the Chromium source. Compiling the Chromium source is a complex task that might be difficult for novice computer users. The first stage of the task requires preparing the hard drive for a new installation by formatting it. All commands entered to the kernel are Linux commands because Google Chromium is based on Linux.

Insert the Chromium installation disc in your computer. Restart the computer. When prompted, press any key to enter the boot disc. A kernel shell will flash while waiting for a command. Type "fdisk /dev/hda" and press "Enter." Type "d" and press "Enter." Type "1" and press "Enter" again to delete the initial partition. Type "n" and then "p." Type "1" and press "Enter." This creates a new partition. Press "1" and press "Enter," then press "Enter" again. Type "mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdb1" and press "Enter" to create your new file system for the drive. Type "mkdir /disk1" and press "Enter." Type "mont /dev/sdb1 /disk" and press "Enter," then "df-H" and press "Enter." This partitions and formats your hard drive, which now is ready to work using the Chromium operating system. http://www.chromium.org/chromium-os/developer-guide

Jan 28, 2013 | Samsung Chromebook Series 3 XE303C12

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Backup data from non-booting operating system


You go to boot your computer and you get an error. Asking around online you find out that the only thing left to do is to reformat and reinstall the operating system, causing all your data to be lost. Is there nothing you can do? Actually, yes there is. I will explain how to use the <a href="http://www.sysresccd.org/Download">System Rescue CD</a> to save your data, then restore it on the new installation! This can be done with any linux live CD, but the system rescue CD is a little easier, so that's what I'll use to explain it.<br /><br />What You'll Need:<br /> <ul> <li>System Rescue CD</li> <li>External USB drive LARGER THAN your internal drive (or at least equal to)</li> <li>Some time and patience :)<br /></li></ul> <ol> <li>Download the .iso file from the website linked above, then burn it to a disk. This will give you a working copy of the System Rescue CD. You'll want to download the latest working copy, listed as the "Final Stable Version". It will always be on top (at the time of writing it's <b>2.3.0</b>).</li> <li>Insert the disk into the non-working computer. You might have to turn it on and quickly open the CD drive to put it in. Then restart. Depending on your system, it might boot to the CD automatically. If not, look around when you first boot for "Boot Menu" usually on the bottom of the screen, it will tell you which function button to hit. F7, F9, F10, F11, Esc, and Del are popular ones. Try different buttons, you can't hurt anything, and if it doesn't work just hit Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart and try again.</li> <li>When it finally boots to the CD, keep pressing enter until you get a prompt that reads "root@sysresccd / %" that means you're at the command line. Now there are two ways to go, using the command line and using the GUI. I'll explain the command line first, then the gui.</li></ol>Command Line:<br /> <ol> <li>(NOTE: All commands will be surrounded by "double quotes". Do not type the quotes.) Type "fdisk -l /dev/sda" and take a look at the partitioning scheme. There should be at least one partition, formatted NTFS. Most of the time it's sda1, but it could be that you have one small partition and one large one. You need to figure out where your windows partition is, so you can back the data up. Pick which one you think it is (I'm going to assume sda1) and type "ntfs-3g /dev/sda1 /mnt/windows", then type "cd /mnt/windows" then "ls" (NOTE: that's an "ell", not an "eye"). If you see some windows directories (like Program Files), you've got the right partition. If not, type "cd /mnt; umount /mnt/windows" and retry.</li> <li>When you have your windows partition mounted, plug in your external harddrive and wait a minute or two to be sure that it's recognized.</li> <li>Type "dmesg". A lot of text should scroll, then it should put you back at your command prompt. In the last few lines you should see something like "USB Mass Storage Drive entered: sdb" or something similar. The important part is the sdb. Type "fdisk -l /dev/sdb" again to look at the partitions (there should only be one), then type "ntfs-3g /dev/sdb1 /mnt/backup" to mount it as the backup disk.</li> <li>Type "mkdir DataBackup" to create the folder to store the backup in, then type "cd DataBackup" to change to that directory.</li> <li>Now type "rsync -av --progress /mnt/windows ./" to copy everything from the windows directory to the DataBackup directory. Wait until it's done, then reboot.</li></ol>GUI:<br /> <ol> <li>Type "wizard" at the command prompt, then keep hitting enter until you get a gui. Go through the "start menu" until you find something called gparted. Open that and take a look at everything you've got.</li> <li>On the top right you'll see the drive you're currently perusing. sda is your internal drive, sdb is your USB. Right click on the largest box under sda and click "Mount". It should give you a dialog box, choose the directory /mnt/windows. Do the same for sdb, mounting it at /mnt/backup.</li> <li>Open the file manager (it should look like a folder on the taskbar). In the left pane, navigate to /mnt/windows, in the right, navigate to /mtn/backup.</li> <li>Create a directory in the right pane named DataBackup (should be able to right-click&gt;New Folder), then open that folder.</li> <li>Select everything in the left pane and copy it to the right using the button in between the panes. You can hover with the mouse over the buttons to see what they do.***</li> <li>Wait until the transfer is complete, then you've got your backup!</li></ol>*** If there is an error that sdb is not writeable, open the command prompt (should have opened when you started the gui) and type "umount /dev/sdb", then type "ntfs-3g /dev/sdb1 /mnt/backup". That will make it writeable.<br /><br />You can use these folders to copy your data back off once your installation has been fixed. Note that you cannot copy over programs, only data such as saved files, pictures, movies, etc. The programs will have to be reinstalled. Best of luck, and I hope this helps someone!<br /><br />

on Aug 18, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

My iomega ex hd wanted to reformat. it started but i stopped it before thew end. did I loose all the info on it


Unfortunately, you probably did. However, you do have a few options to fix it.

Option 1: Recover deleted files/partitions

Download the active@ partition recovery utility and try running that. I'm not 100% sure how this program works, so you might need to look around the site for some tutorials or something to get it working, but it seems like a pretty good solution.

Option 2: Rebuild the partition.
In order to do this you need to know what file system was originally on the drive. It will most likely be NTFS or FAT32. The best way to do it is to get a linux live cd like the System Rescue CD. Download the .iso file and burn it to a disk, then boot your computer from the disk. Keep hitting enter until you get a command prompt (should say root@sysresccd$). At that point plug in your external drive and wait a minute or two, then type "fdisk -l" (NOTE: That's an "ell", not an "eye". Also, don't type the quotes). You should see some entry on there for /dev/sdb, but it probably won't have any partitions at the moment, which is fine. However, write down the size of your Type "fdisk /dev/sdb" to enter the disk formatting screen. Now type the following:
n (to create new partition)
p (for primary partition)
1 (for partition number)
default for First cylinder
1 (for partition number)
7 (for NTFS partition)
w (to write changes)

Next, type "ntfs-3g /dev/sdb1 /mnt/backup" and "ntfs-3g /dev/sda1 /mnt/windows". This will mount your external drive and internal drive to /mnt/backup and /mnt/windows respectively. Type "cd /mnt/windows" then "mkdir backup" to create another folder. Now type "rsync -av --progress /mnt/backup backup/" to copy everything available in your external drive to your internal drive. Hopefully you can get your stuff back, best of luck!

Tj

Aug 22, 2011 | Iomega Prestige 1 TB USB 20 Hard Drive

1 Answer

I have an iomega lphd-up external drive it was working fine now it is saying that it needs to be fomated plugged in to several laptops i get the same message. i dont wanna lose the content. what can i do?


Try getting a live cd (such as the system rescue cd). Burn the .iso file to a disk, then boot from the CD by hitting a key at your BIOS menu (usually F1 or F9) to bring up the boot menu, and select CD. Once you've booted and you have your prompt, plug in your external drive and try the following commands:

fdisk -l (that will show you all the disks attached to your computer. Typically the first disk [internal] is sda, and the USB disk is sdb.) The thing to take note of here is the last column on the list that contains /dev/sdb#, it should say NTFS, or FAT32, or something like that.

fsck /dev/sdb1 (that will check the file system on the first partition on your external drive. If it comes back with an errory, try fsck.NTFS or fsck.FAT32, whatever the file system was in the first part.)

testdsk /dev/sdb (That will initiate a harddrive test that could find/fix errors with your drive).

If none of that works, plug in another drive to make a backup of your external. Take note that it's important to have free space on the SECOND (not broken) external that is EQUAL TO or GREATER than the amount of USED space on the broken drive.

Once the backup drive is plugged in, type mount /dev/sdc1 /mnt/backup (if that doesn't work or it says something about NTFS and read only, type umount /mnt/backup; ntfs-3g /dev/sdc1 /mnt/backup).

Finally, type mkdir /mnt/backup/SDB to make a directory to store the files.

Now with the second drive, try to mount it using the advice for sdc (although change /mnt/backup to /mnt/windows)

If it mounts, then type rsync -av --progress /mnt/windows /mnt/backup/SDB/ which will start copying all the files onto the backup drive. NOTE: This will cause a lot of text to scroll, and will take a long time!

Once that's finished, you can restart into windows and format your drive, then plug in the extra drive and copy everything back over.

Hopefully that helps!

Jul 20, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Hello, I formatted the M3000 with Ubuntu Linux, and... i'm stupid


Take your Sanyo back to Linux box, hook up the USB cable, and then mount it.

Copy the files that you want to keep on to the $HOME directory on Linux.

Next, from a terminal, run
sudo fdisk -l

to display all the mounted filesystems on the computer.

It might be /dev/sdb1, or /dev/sdc1 You should be able to pick out the M3000 as its hard disk size is 6.0 GB. Let's assume that the USB drive is on /dev/sdb1

Re-run the fdisk command.

sudo fdisk /dev/sdb

(press m to get the help menu).

Recommend that you choose d to delete a partition,
then n to create a new partition
when asked about the code for the new partition, use b -- this corresponds to Windows 95 FAT32 file system.

Don't forget w to write the new partition definition out to the USB drive.
Lastly q to quit fdisk.

Once you exit fdisk, remount the M3000 and make sure that you copy your files back on to it.

All Linux and Windows systems should be able to recognize your drive now.



Mar 16, 2010 | Sanyo HDP-M3000 MP3 Player

4 Answers

What is grub error 17? how to fix it?


Its GRand Unified Bootloader used in Linux OS.
Normally you get this error when GRUB is not able recognise the partition from which you are trying to boot the system. Make sure the boot partition on your system is recognisable by GRUB (such as EXT3).

You can try to restore the GRUB using the LIVE CD
  1. Boot From Live CD
  2. Open Terminal Window
  3. type >sudo grub
  4. then type : find /boot/grub/stage1
  5. you'll get something like: (hd0, 1)
  6. then type : >root (hd0, 1)
  7. type: > setup (hd0)
  8. >quit
  9. >exit
Remove the Live CD and reboot the system.


Please let me know if you need any further assistance.


Thank you for choosing Fixya




Oct 30, 2009 | Compaq Presario M2000 Notebook

1 Answer

How to mount pen drive in unixware7.1.1 ?


Check the partition table in UnixWare 7 using fdisk

Identify your usb.

Now create a directory usb at root : mkdir /usb

Now mount: mount /usb <device found> eg. mount /usb /dev/sdb1

Jul 08, 2009 | Sco UnixWare 7 for Unix

1 Answer

Fsck error HELP! HELP ! HELP!


fsck is a file system error check command. Try the root password of nothing, (just the enter key), when ask for the password. Then use the fsck command to repair the file system before rebooting.
fsck - check and repair a Linux file system Try fsck with no options.
SYNOPSIS fsck [ -sACVRTNP ] [ -t fstype ] [filesys ... ] [--] [ fs-specific-options ]
DESCRIPTION fsck is used to check and optionally repair one or more Linux file systems. filesys can be a device name (e.g. /dev/hdc1, /dev/sdb2), a mount point (e.g. /, /usr, /home), or an ext2 label or UUID specifier (e.g. UUID=8868abf6-88c5-4a83-98b8-bfc24057f7bd or LABEL=root). Normally, the fsck program will try to run filesystems on different physical disk drives in parallel to reduce total amount time to check all of the filesystems.
If no filesystems are specified on the command line, and the -A option is not specified, fsck will default to checking filesystems in /etc/fstab serial. This is equivalent to the -As options.

May 27, 2009 | HP Pavilion dv2000t 14.1" Notebook Laptop...

1 Answer

JFS224 change drive order


You need to get into bios to change the boot order. You can usually get into bios by tapping F12, esc, or whatever depending on who wrote your bios. Once you get into bios, you should see something like change boot order somewhere. If you don't know where it is then just keep scanning each page and you will find it. It will be called something "boot order". Use the directions on screen to change it to whatever drive you desire and you should be good to go. If you can't do it then write back and let me know.

Feb 01, 2008 | Chaparral Technologies CHAPARRAL - JFS224

2 Answers

Cannot format my MP3 player


I'd suggest to reformat it using FAT filesystem. In linux, type mkdosfs -F32 /dev/sdb1 (or however your device is named)

Oct 11, 2006 | MSI MEGA Stick 511 (512 MB) MP3 Player

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