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How to replace damaged piston & connecting rod

The piston is dammaged

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2 Answers

Can you change a piston with out pulling the motor.


Remove the oil pan and unbolt the connecting rod from the crankshaft on the damaged piston and push it up. It will come out without removing the engine

Mar 01, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Can I fix my connecting rod with my Dremel and reassemble would it possibly work.connecting Rod has rolled up edges


no,there is a reason why the edge is like that,if not it is damaged,fix the reason it is damaged and get a new connecting rod,if you cant get just one,replace all of them and pistons and rings,stop trying to be cheap,it is the heart of the motor

Mar 12, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Some piston dammage


Here's the scoop.
Underneath that piston is a wrist pin, and then a connecting rod, and then a bearing that goes around the crankshaft. The bearing is split into two pieces, upper and lower. Some folks have put the engine together, as you wish to do. The top of the piston is engineered to be a certain way. if there is a tiny imperfection, what might (maybe) happen is pre-ignition, if that part of the piston heats hotter than the surrounding surface, and will cause the engine to run poorly. Next, if the valve hit the piston, there might be some tiny damage to the connecting rod, the wrist pin, or mainly, the bearing on the crankshaft. Probably all you would see is the engine would throw a rod in the next 5,000 miles, or sooner.
I share your desire to save money and time on this. If you decide to button it up, please take some fine sandpaper and a good shop vacuum and try to smooth the imperfections in the top of the piston and vacuum all dust and shavings up as you work.
Be blessed.

Nov 11, 2013 | Volkswagen Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Can you turn motor by hand with 2 rods unhooked or does do damage


Well if the connecting rods hit the crank, it could scratch the bearing surface. If the pistons were at the top of the cylinders, and you have an interference engine, the valves could have struck the pistons but they probably would have moved down and not caused any damage.
You would have known if the rods jammed against the crank since that would have stopped the crank from turning.

Jul 01, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Connecting rod has hole in it


If you want to fix this you will need a new engine, that is about a $2000.00-$2500.00 job.Shop around for the best price, it will vary allot. I would use a GM replacement engine as the aftermarket rebuilds can be of poor quality. The factory part is very cheap.

Oct 01, 2012 | 1999 Chevrolet Suburban

1 Answer

How to remove crankshaft for campbell hausfeld compressor


I assume you have removed the valve head-valve plate-cylinder assembly from the base and pistons. Remove the four bolts holding the bearing cap assembly on one side of the crankcase and remove the cap. You have to pull on the crank to get the crank bearing out of the opposite side of the crankcase. Move the crank forward and turn it until the rear bearing will clear the crankcase and the whole thing will tilt and come out the top. Campbell sells the entire crank, con rods, pistons & rings as an assembly under part number VT040600AJ. This is the best way to go as they don't have con rods to go on the crank if you were to get the journals turned down. NOTE: During reassembly, the bottoms of the cylinders have a taper so you don't need a ring compressor to get the pistons in the cylinders. Just be sure the oil rings are in properly before pushing the cylinder all the way down. The thin oil scrapper rings have a tendency to fold over and get caught between the piston and cylinder.

Jan 29, 2012 | Air Tools & Compressors

1 Answer

The engine has blown. I need to replace it or change pistons and rings. How difficult is it to change pistons and rings?


It can be time consuming and the end result may not be desirable if you haven't done it before.
--- The following is just a sample of what to do once the engine is torn down: Pistons and Connecting Rods
  1. Before installing the piston/connecting rod assembly, oil the pistons, piston rings and the cylinder walls with light engine oil. Install connecting rod bolt protectors or rubber hose onto the connecting rod bolts/studs. Also perform the following:
    1. Select the proper ring set for the size cylinder bore.
    2. Position the ring in the bore in which it is going to be used.
    3. Push the ring down into the bore area where normal ring wear is not encountered.
    4. Use the head of the piston to position the ring in the bore so that the ring is square with the cylinder wall. Use caution to avoid damage to the ring or cylinder bore.
    5. Measure the gap between the ends of the ring with a feeler gauge. Ring gap in a worn cylinder is normally greater than specification. If the ring gap is greater than the specified limits, try an oversize ring set. Fig. 5: Checking the piston ring-to-ring groove side clearance using the ring and a feeler gauge tccs3923.gif

    6. Check the ring side clearance of the compression rings with a feeler gauge inserted between the ring and its lower land according to specification. The gauge should slide freely around the entire ring circumference without binding. Any wear that occurs will form a step at the inner portion of the lower land. If the lower lands have high steps, the piston should be replaced. Fig. 6: The notch on the side of the bearing cap matches the tang on the bearing insert tccs3917.gif

  2. Unless new pistons are installed, be sure to install the pistons in the cylinders from which they were removed. The numbers on the connecting rod and bearing cap must be on the same side when installed in the cylinder bore. If a connecting rod is ever transposed from one engine or cylinder to another, new bearings should be fitted and the connecting rod should be numbered to correspond with the new cylinder number. The notch on the piston head goes toward the front of the engine.
  3. Install all of the rod bearing inserts into the rods and caps. Fig. 7: Most rings are marked to show which side of the ring should face up when installed to the piston tccs3222.gif

  4. Install the rings to the pistons. Install the oil control ring first, then the second compression ring and finally the top compression ring. Use a piston ring expander tool to aid in installation and to help reduce the chance of breakage. Fig. 8: Install the piston and rod assembly into the block using a ring compressor and the handle of a hammer tccs3914.gif

  5. Make sure the ring gaps are properly spaced around the circumference of the piston. Fit a piston ring compressor around the piston and slide the piston and connecting rod assembly down into the cylinder bore, pushing it in with the wooden hammer handle. Push the piston down until it is only slightly below the top of the cylinder bore. Guide the connecting rod onto the crankshaft bearing journal carefully, to avoid damaging the crankshaft.
  6. Check the bearing clearance of all the rod bearings, fitting them to the crankshaft bearing journals. Follow the procedure in the crankshaft installation above.
  7. After the bearings have been fitted, apply a light coating of assembly oil to the journals and bearings.
  8. Turn the crankshaft until the appropriate bearing journal is at the bottom of its stroke, then push the piston assembly all the way down until the connecting rod bearing seats on the crankshaft journal. Be careful not to allow the bearing cap screws to strike the crankshaft bearing journals and damage them.
  9. After the piston and connecting rod assemblies have been installed, check the connecting rod side clearance on each crankshaft journal.
  10. Prime and install the oil pump and the oil pump intake tube.
  11. Install the auxiliary/balance shaft(s)/assembly(ies).
OHV Engines CAMSHAFT, LIFTERS AND TIMING ASSEMBLY
  1. Install the camshaft.
  2. Install the lifters/followers into their bores.
  3. Install the timing gears/chain assembly.
CYLINDER HEAD(S)
  1. Install the cylinder head(s) using new gaskets.
  2. Assemble the rest of the valve train (pushrods and rocker arms and/or shafts).
OHC Engines CYLINDER HEAD(S)
  1. Install the cylinder head(s) using new gaskets.
  2. Install the timing sprockets/gears and the belt/chain assemblies.
Engine Covers and Components Install the timing cover(s) and oil pan. Refer to your notes and drawings made prior to disassembly and install all of the components that were removed. Install the engine into the vehicle. Engine Start-up and Break-in STARTING THE ENGINE Now that the engine is installed and every wire and hose is properly connected, go back and double check that all coolant and vacuum hoses are connected. Check that your oil drain plug is installed and properly tightened. If not already done, install a new oil filter onto the engine. Fill the crankcase with the proper amount and grade of engine oil. Fill the cooling system with a 50/50 mixture of coolant/water.
  1. Connect the vehicle battery.
  2. Start the engine. Keep your eye on your oil pressure indicator; if it does not indicate oil pressure within 10 seconds of starting, turn the vehicle OFF. WARNING
    Damage to the engine can result if it is allowed to run with no oil pressure. Check the engine oil level to make sure that it is full. Check for any leaks and if found, repair the leaks before continuing. If there is still no indication of oil pressure, you may need to prime the system.
  3. Confirm that there are no fluid leaks (oil or other).
  4. Allow the engine to reach normal operating temperature (the upper radiator hose will be hot to the touch).
  5. At this point any necessary checks or adjustments can be performed, such as ignition timing.
  6. Install any remaining components or body panels which were removed. prev.gif next.gif

Oct 17, 2010 | 1995 Ford Thunderbird

2 Answers

How to replace the piston connecting rod on a 1993 chevrolet corsica 3.1L?


If you need to replace a rod, generally you have a bearing problem that requires crankshaft removal/replacement as well. If you have a bad wrist-pin on the small end of the rod or the rod bent from hydro-lock and bearings are good, you need to remove the oil pan and the cylinder head as the piston/rod assembly comes out from the top.
If you have a spun bearing or broken rod, the entire engine needs to be removed, completely torn down and all passages flushed...far easier to replace engine with a good used one.
To do either, you will need a manual to guide you through the process (far too long to write out here) Sorry I need to tell you this but that's just the way it is...better you know before even attempting to do the job.

Aug 27, 2009 | Chevrolet Corsica Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Piston & connecting Rod to be changed.


Hello Sir..

u can even do some bore related work on the engine..!! but i prefer to replace the things...!! as repairing may cost 2500 buckx...n again after 10000kms u should do it again..

instead plz replace it with a new one !!


n plz do it very quickly !! else if unattended it may lead to crank n gear box damage..!! so...better do it as early as possible !!

May 15, 2009 | 2006 Hero Honda Glamour

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