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What's the best time for my child to take a nap?

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When it is feeling sleepy?

Posted on Mar 27, 2014

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Am I the only daycare worker who takes care of a child that I can't find one good thing to say about him?


You shouldn't be in an early childhood environment from the sounds of things. I've taught preschool, pre-kindergarten, nursery school, and Sunday School, all early childhood 18 months-5 year old kids. I've had classes as small as 12 and classes as large as 48.

The first thing that you need to understand is that young children have an extremely short attention span. The general rule is you get one minute of their attention for each year old they are up to age 5. What this means is a 1 year old has a 1 minute attention span; a 2 year old has a 2 minute attention span; a 3 year old has a 3 minute attention span; and so on and so forth. That means that the average four year old has a four minute attention span. That doesn't mean that every four year old has that short or that long of an attention span, it's a general guideline.

What you need to realize is that middle school and early childhood education are two very, very different worlds. Middle school aged children are in the pre-teen age and are very difficult to work with. You have things like peer pressure, bullying, makeup, drugs, alcohol, etc to worry about. I would lose my mind in a classroom of middle school aged children because I do not have patience for the smart mouthing, the back talking, and the drama, all of which middle school aged children have. At the same time, there are people I know, including my significant other, who would lose it in a classroom of 48 four and five year old's. I've seen many parent helpers fold under the pressure.

The way a child behaves in school, daycare, and other settings depends on the way that they are allowed to behave at home. If they get away with hitting, pushing, and biting siblings at home, chances are they will try it on their peers in the classroom. Sometimes, a child who is a little angel at home is poorly behaved in a classroom setting, and when that happens, you have to find the cause. It could be anything from them not getting to use their favorite colored crayon to someone grabbing the book they wanted before they did. On the opposite end of things, if you have a child that behaves badly at home, but is an angel in school, it's usually a reflection of the parenting and/or the child not getting enough attention at home and loving the attention they receive in class.

Some of what you described is not misbehaving at all. Asking the same question 100 times is very normal for kids this age. So is the "why" questions. Example: "why is the sky blue", "because God made it that way", "why", "because he made everything perfect", "why". You can get stuck in that loop if you are not careful. The best way around it is to try to avoid answering questions with a simple yes or no, so they don't ask for clarification. You get used to kids asking the same question 100 times, even 1,000 times. I remember I had a child who used to ask "why do we wear shoes" every five minutes.

As you've found out, ignoring a child is not going to help the situation, nor is it going to make the child stop asking questions. Ignoring the child is also considered disrespectful when they are not doing anything wrong, especially in a classroom setting. What you need to do is divert the child's thought pattern into the activity that you are currently doing. For instance, the child who asked "why do we wear shoes" asked when it was snack time, so I said "Amy we wear shoes to protect our feet, do you want to help me get snack ready". If you give children the chance to show that they can be helpers and do good things, they act out less frequently.

The getting up and down from nap is also quite normal. Some kids don't take naps at home. If they don't have naps at home on the weekends, transitioning them into nap time for the school week is hard to do. You can try handing the child a book to "read quietly" and say something like "Brittany, it's okay if you don't want to take a nap but I need you to stay on your cot and read quietly so that the other kids can sleep". Believe it or not, if you offer an alternative to napping, the child will often take it. Sometimes if you give them a book to read quietly, they will settle down on their cot and fall asleep on their own, literally because they had permission not to take a nap.

The other behaviors that you describe are not considered normal for a four year old. Throwing toys over the fence is never acceptable. When this happens usually a time out is the best way to solve it, put the kid away from the playing children and let him simmer down and realize he can't have fun while he's on time out. Tell him when he's ready to apologize and change his behavior he can get out of time out. The lying is also unacceptable, I would bet he has listening and behavior problems at home.

Calling a kid a brat is never acceptable. Disliking a child and wanting them gone is never acceptable. Whether you like a kid or not, you should never feel like you want them gone. Some kids go through phases and behave completely different in six months or a year then they do right now. Some kids stay that way their entire life. When you say you are glad you want the kid gone, what you are essentially saying is if the kid got hit by a car and died, you wouldn't miss them. If that was not your intention in your words, you should be careful how you word things, because parents can see that as threatening. I would never allow a child to be in a classroom where a teacher or worker did not want the child to be there or the child was thought to be a brat.

Your statement that you love that the mom believes a different environment would be a different situation which you believe is false is ludicrous. You have NO IDEA how this child acts at home, in restaurants, outside of the classroom, unless you've spent time with this child outside of the classroom. Having also been a nanny, daycare worker, and babysitter for many years, I can tell you that the way an adult approaches a child, the mixture of the kids, everything down to the temperature of the room can affect a child and sometimes yes, all it takes is a different environment.

I think you really need to examine your heart and see if you have a heart for this age group. It sounds like being among the middle school aged children gave you thick skin, which I commend you for, because I definitely don't have it. Preschoolers on the other hand need love, discipline, acceptance, and plenty of patience. It sounds like you do not have the heart for this type of work.

Jan 04, 2017 | Preschool

Tip

HOW TO GET YOUR CHILD TO MOVE FROM A CRIB TO A TODDLER BED


There is no fixed age to move your kid to a toddler bed. You can use their and readiness to guide you. Sometimes parents move their kids out of the crib once they are able to climb out by themselves as this can result in an injury, so it's safer to be in a toddler bed. Here are some tips for helping to make the transition a smooth one:

Relax - If you are tense about your kid moving from the crib, they will pick up on it. Don't rush the move as toddlers like to do things in their own time. Some kids are very excited to make the transition to a more grown up bed but others are fearful. If your child is reluctant, you could let them use it just for daytime naps at the beginning.

Involve your child - make the move to a toddler bed a joint project. Let your child have a say in what kind of bed they would like. If that's not possible, you can always let them pick out a new duvet cover or sheets.

Keep the bedtime routine - moving beds is a big enough move. Don't make any changes to the bedtime routine. Kids love the stability of routine. So if you usually read a story or sing to your child before bedtime, do exactly the same thing once they are in their bed.

Don't panic - some kids sleep really well from their first night in a toddler bed and others take ages to settle. If your child keeps getting up and coming to your room, don't panic. Try not to get cross or turn the issue into a battleground. Just firmly but lovingly take your child back to their own bed. If you stick to this method, your child will eventually get the message.

Be positive - Even if it doesn't seem like a big deal to you, it's a huge transition for your toddler as it marks a movement from baby days to toddler ones. Gives lots of praise, even for the small successes and you will help your child feel self-confident and proud at this milestone.

Good Luck and Enjoy!

on Aug 16, 2012 | Baby Gear

1 Answer

Is it normal for a child to cry a lot when they go to daycare?


There is no reason that any parent should have a "suck it up studies are important" attitude when it comes to preschool. While preschool is about learning, it is also about making friends, dealing with separation, and learning how to attend school...something that kids don't learn how to do without practice.

When a child cries at preschool it can mean any number of things:
The child is spoiled and is constantly held by mom, dad, or another family member at home and cannot stand not being held at school

The child does not feel comfortable in the classroom whether because they are uncertain about the teacher, their peers, or the separation from their parents

The child thinks that their parents are abandoning them and will not come back for them, because this is very common thinking for this age group

The child thinks that something is going to happen to them that is bad if mom and/or dad leave because they cannot fathom in their brain dealing with anything without their parents around

When a child cries at preschool, the worst thing that a parent can do is to hang around and cuddle and hold the child. This teaches the child that they can get mom or dad to stay just by crying and every time this scenario is played out, it makes the next separation that much harder. Allowing the child to bring a familiar item from home such as a favorite book, favorite stuffed animal to hold during nap time, or putting a photo of their family in their backpack or lunchbox can help a child get through the day.

In other cases, sometimes when a child cries at preschool it can be a sign of something more serious, like abuse from one of the adults in the preschool. It's important as a parent to volunteer in your child's class from time to time, observe your child's teacher, and report anything strange, unusual, or that makes you uncomfortable immediately. Additionally, you can ask your child about their day at school. Ask them questions that require more than a yes or no answer such as "What did you do at school today" vs "Did you have fun at school today". Ask your child questions like "What didn't you like about school today". Children are brutally honest and if something is going on at your child's school, they are bound to open up about it to you if you know the right questions to ask.

Jan 04, 2017 | Preschool

3 Answers

RP3721A How to turn off NAP button


I've seen some comments that you can't turn NAP off once it's set.

You can turn off NAP by holding down the NAP button for a few seconds again once the clock has exited NAP set mode and is showing the time. When you first hit the button, it'll go back into NAP set mode (probably showing 0:20) but after a few seconds, you'll go back to the time with NAP off.

Trick is, the button's a little quirky, and you have to hold down just the edge closest to the back of the clock. The middle of the button or any other edge just throws you back into NAP time adjust but never turns it off. I have no idea why--must be a design or manufacturing flaw of some kind.

Apr 08, 2009 | RCA Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Manual RCA RP3710A


For the snooze, hold down the snooze button (should display the length of time for snoozing) and hit the time/tune buttons up or down to increase or decrease the snooze time.

For the nap time, press nap and the nap indicator should start blinking. Again, hit the time/tune buttons up or down to increase or decrease the name time in 10 minute increments up to 2 hours.

Oct 21, 2008 | RCA RP-3765 Clock Radio

2 Answers

Nap Feature


i press the nap button and hold down the cancel button and it works fine

Sep 20, 2008 | RCA Radio Alarm Clock

2 Answers

Turning off "NAP" feature


You have to "double-click" the "NAP" button. And on the second "click," hold it down until the "NAP" light goes off.
That worked for me three times in a row, at least.

Sep 05, 2008 | RCA RP5610 Clock Radio

6 Answers

NAP


JUST HOLD THE NAP BUTTON UNTIL IT NO LONGER IS BLINKING NAP, dont return it, its very good at waking you up in the morning, and is basically a good alarm clock, it just has a different way of turning nap off.

Feb 25, 2008 | GE 74801 DUAL ALARM CLOCK RADIO .9" LCD

2 Answers

Snooze alarm


Like everyone else here I have accidentally hit the NAP button and couldn't turn it off. This morning at 2am I accidentally hit it with my husband in bed. I decided one and for all to guide this out. By flashlight and my cell phone i Googled a solution. I came across many, none of which worked. I resorted to trying methods that were posted for other models of this brand of clocks. The solution that I found that worked was to hold down the back part of the NAP button until the seat the time displayed and the nap light off. By back part of the button I mean hold down the tiny section closest to the rear of the clock. I got this solution from instructions for model RP3721A clock. It took me 17 minutes.That's just 3 minutes before the alarm would have gone off.

Nov 01, 2007 | RCA RP5440 Clock Radio

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